Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Video - how to apply a tourniquet properly

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by ATCclears, Apr 22, 2013.

  1. ATCclears

    ATCclears Seattle area, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,261
    Likes Received:
    1,372
  2. JTech

    JTech SW Washington Member

    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    69
    In light of recent events this is sadly relevant. Thanks for the link!
     
  3. lola85

    lola85 Portland Member

    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    12
    Always remember when choosing to use a tourniquet you are choosing life over limb. Be careful of application.
     
  4. Bob D

    Bob D Oregon, Cascades Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    455
    Likes Received:
    299
    If you can get to modern medical facilities within 8 hours, the chances of losing a limb from a tourniquet are negligible. The initial damage that caused the bleeding may dictate amputation, but the tourniquet itself rarely does anymore.

    In fact, we're now taught to apply a tourniquet as a first step to control bleeding. Later, if the wound wasn't as bad as originally thought, it can be loosened after a pressure dressing is applied. In fact, a lot of the special forces guys go into the field with four loose combat tourniquets already in place on their arms and legs.

    They tell us to throw tourniquets on anything that's bleeding more than superficially. In fact, it's the only medical care we're supposed to give while still under fire.
     
  5. Modeler

    Modeler Molalla, Oregon Soccer Fan

    Messages:
    2,538
    Likes Received:
    1,515
    It wouldn't work (in the broad scheme of things) if you chose limb over life, would it?
     
  6. Kevinkris

    Kevinkris Aloha Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,216
    Likes Received:
    444
    well they dont typically do any more damage than the initial wound and if you needed it the wound is pretty bad. just keep in mind the tourniquet is at its most dangerous when you are removing it because the bleeding will simply start again.
     
  7. knuckle Head

    knuckle Head southeast Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,631
    Likes Received:
    918
    I learned how to do this 35 years ago in army basic training, I have not forgotten how, I have never had to do a tourniquet fortuantely (although I have had to use a lot of of my other training both fortuantely and unfornately depends on your point of view) and pray I never will. But I am glad to see that an actual MD, showing people how to do it and also that what I remember from 35 years ago is exactly what is being shown, it ells me I have not forgotten a thing.

    I give this video :thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup: out of five
     
  8. hatchj

    hatchj Milwaukie, OR Member

    Messages:
    152
    Likes Received:
    24

    I'm just curious what your...line of work is? I just got sent home from the army because of injury(long story), and they taught it as a last resort technique.
     
  9. Kevinkris

    Kevinkris Aloha Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,216
    Likes Received:
    444
    well yes and no. if you have good medical supplies you should do your best to stop the bleeding with direct pressure. if that doesnt work or you dont have clean bandage materials you should go to the tourniquet. the problem is, you need to be headed for help any time you put one on.
     
  10. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    2,800
    Likes Received:
    1,854
    Since I'm not in the military, the steps to controlling bleeding:

    Direct Pressure
    Elevation (above heart)
    Pressure point (similar to tourniquet)
    Tourniquet

    The most dangerous part of loosening a tourniquet after application is you are taking a bunch of blood that was in that limb, that has no oxygen, and is full of lactic acid, and dumping it into the rest of the circulatory system, if done quickly this can be dangerous if not fatal to the rest of the body.

    The level of medical care that has developed over the last 12 years of war especially in terms of trauma care has been a huge shift in how injuries are treated, everything from tourniquets (which used to be the 'last resort'), to pain management. The next injuries that are currently topping the list are TBIs (traumatic brain injuries), the development of treatment protocols for these will greatly improve the lives of both servicemen and civilians alike.
     
  11. DoubleTapDrew

    DoubleTapDrew Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,078
    Likes Received:
    377
    What about things like quikclot or celox to fill the gap between the superficial and tourniquet? Are those used?
     
  12. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    2,800
    Likes Received:
    1,854
    Quickclot requires debridement of the wound after application... really the main application for this stuff is deep wounds to the core/trunk of the body where a tourniquet is not possible. Even then, I don't think I would use it unless I was dealing with someone with a deep arterial bleed and they were clearly going to die without immediate intervention such as this. If not I would stick with pressure/ab pad. I consider celox/quickclot to be a step beyond tourniquet.