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I dont have a Conceal permit but I was wondering what Marion county, specifically the city of Salem, means when they say "readily accessible"? If my handgun is in a SnapSafe lockbox, locked, away from the key, but it's on my passenger seat, is this readily accessible? Just wondering if I can find an answer here before I make some calls to the local PD, as well as city hall. Thank you :))
 
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THIS ☝️
I always cringe when I see people ask about "legal advice" for anything gun related on the net. Anyone can tell them anything. Sadly many laws are written in such a way as to leave a LOT of guess work too. Dealing with an LEO on the side of the road god only knows from one time to the next how some law like this is going to be "interpreted". As Stomper said do not drive like a moron, and if you get pulled over be careful about volunteering information.
For me? When I am traveling out of state guns are secured. Have not been stopped in a hell of a long time but, if I was? If asked? I would say no. If for some unknown reason they decided to search my car? I at that point would be saying "lawyer" to all questions.
 
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I dont have a Conceal permit but I was wondering what Marion county, specifically the city of Salem, means when they say "readily accessible"? If my handgun is in a SnapSafe lockbox, locked, away from the key, but it's on my passenger seat, is this readily accessible? Just wondering if I can find an answer here before I make some calls to the local PD, as well as city hall. Thank you :))
If it's locked with no ammo around I would think that you'd be more than complaint.
However, it won't do you much good in that condition other than to just travel with it.

Get a CHL.
 
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I don't believe there is any definitive answer to that question. Only what level you are comfortable with and willing to legally argue if the LEO that pulled you over's definition differs from your own. Intent and circumstances can swing both ways quite widely.

In the strictest sense, "readily accessible for immediate use" can be defined as, "a firearm or other weapon is carried on the person or within such close proximity and in such a manner that it can be retrieved and used as easily and quickly as if carried on the person."

Oregon's definition would be more along the lines of, "anywhere within the passenger compartment" is considered "readily accessible".

You might also hear about the "3-step rule". Which is a made up set of conditions that has no legal basis, but more a common sense "guide". If it requires 3 seperate actions to bring your firearm to being readily useable status, it is duly argueable in court that your firearm was not, "readily accessible".

IMHO, what's on paper vs. reality will depend solely on the conditions your firearm was "discovered", your cooperation and the personal assessment of the LEO on scene.

Example: Being pulled over for reckless driving and suspicion of DUI you're much more likely to get slapped with a concealed handgun charge ("anywhere withing the passenger compartment")... with your firearm mag out and in the glovebox than you would being pulled over for a broken tail light ("not readily accessible") under the same conditions. ;)
 
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I don't believe there is any definitive answer to that question. Only what level you are comfortable with and willing to legally argue if the LEO that pulled you over's definition differs from your own. Intent and circumstances can swing both ways quite widely.

In the strictest sense, "readily accessible for immediate use" can be defined as, "a firearm or other weapon is carried on the person or within such close proximity and in such a manner that it can be retrieved and used as easily and quickly as if carried on the person."

Oregon's loose definition would be more along the lines of, "anywhere within the passenger compartment" is considered "readily accessible".

You might also hear about the "3-step rule". Which is a made up set of conditions that has no legal basis, but more a common sense "guide". If it requires 3 seperate actions to bring your firearm to being readily useable status, it is duly argueable in court that your firearm was not, "readily accessible".

IMHO, what's on paper vs. reality will depend solely on the conditions your firearm was "discovered", your cooperation and the personal assessment of the LEO on scene.

Example: Being pulled over for reckless driving and suspicion of DUI you're much more likely to get slapped with a concealed handgun charge ("anywhere withing the passenger compartment")... with your firearm mag out and in the glovebox than you would being pulled over for a broken tail light ("not readily accessible") under the same conditions. ;)
this was the sorta answer i was looking for, thank you everyone who replied you all gave good info but this guy nailed it
 
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Get your CHL. Don't wonder about these questions. Here in the great state of Texas we have constitutional carry and I still have my LTC ( license to carry, Texas' version of CHL) to make sure I am covered in all directions.
This. Redundancy is key with regards to protecting our rights / arses
 
When you color within the lines, you don’t need to worry about what happens to those coloring outside the lines. All personal discipline. And as @Stomper said, don’t drive like an arse, and you’ll have no problem.

I have a personal philosophy I follow when carrying, I remain the most humble person in the situation. I refuse to allow others to provoke me, don’t have time for it.
 
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I dont have a Conceal permit but I was wondering what Marion county, specifically the city of Salem, means when they say "readily accessible"? If my handgun is in a SnapSafe lockbox, locked, away from the key, but it's on my passenger seat, is this readily accessible? Just wondering if I can find an answer here before I make some calls to the local PD, as well as city hall. Thank you :))
I'm really surprised after two days of replies in this forum nobody has been able to give an answer.
Oregon law ORS166.250 literally gives the definition of "readily accessible" and directly answers your question. Also, never call the PD to explain gun laws, call a lawyer, police do not interpret the law....

 
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I'm really surprised after two days of replies in this forum nobody has been able to give an answer.
Oregon law ORS166.250 literally gives the definition of "readily accessible" and directly answers your question. Also, never call the PD to explain gun laws, call a lawyer, police do not interpret the law....

We're too lazy.
Waiting for you to look it up.
It took you two days ?

:)
 
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We're too lazy.
Waiting for you to look it up.
It took you two days ?

:)
ha, I had other priorities but finally got a break to help out here.... :p

1649528733505.png
 
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I'm really surprised after two days of replies in this forum nobody has been able to give an answer.
You'll note that Oregons "readily accessible" definition was posted earlier.

The letter of the law can be applied to it's fullest extent, however, in practice that doesn't mean that it always will and without exception. To some degree there is personal choice on what an individual feels comfortable with and is willing to legally argue if charged.

Obviously, obtaining a CHL or following the full letter of the law are always going to be the absolute best options.
 
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Id email your local PD and get clarification. Regardless of what any say online, each county and even staties on the hwy will have their own particular loose interpretation/definition of “readily accessible” and with some poor city ordinance wording a LOT can be left open to interpretation.. even if you’re right and proven right later on you may have to piss away time and money in court proving that. An official email with a contact name and number would be a decent thing to have printed out in your firearm transport safe in the county you reside in.

We are in a hyper politicized anti gun era with some law enforcement officers that do not quite understand the true firearm laws of the county/state they serve in. Many I've spoke with have little to no firearm knowledge. Its easier for them to book you and then have it sorted out in court treating your time and money as an unlimited, untapped resource knowing they’ll face no consequences for trumped up or misunderstood charges.

Id assume going to the source (local PD) and having written word (via email) as physical documentation could provide better legal coverage and an exact answer to the one you seek.

That being said, Im sure a locked container not in immediate reach does not fall under “readily accessible” and would be very hard for a leo to cite on even now.. therefore Id assume its gtg.
Its basically what I did
(aside from “in plain sight” type carry) before I had my CHL.
 

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