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They don't like wood stoves, and outlaw them in many areas. Hypocritical.
Why is it that I must have a state approved woodstove that minimizes emissions (at a much greater cost than otherwise), but can go outdoors and burn yard waste straight into the atmosphere to my heart's content?

Edit: Perhaps I should rephrase this: Why is it that someone living on a rural acreage must have a state approved woodstove that minimizes emissions, but can go outdoors and burn yard waste straight into the atmosphere unrestricted (while all around huge slash piles are doing the same).
 
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that was Sarcasm as we wont be allowed run it without power and I guess Rolling blackout and A/C are non compatible.. My point wasn't actually running A/C off grid it was trying to point out the problems California has with it's grid being green. They predict more rolling black outs being unable to meet demand in the heat.
 
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Why is it that I must have a state approved woodstove that minimizes emissions (at a much greater cost than otherwise), but can go outdoors and burn yard waste straight into the atmosphere to my heart's content?

Edit: Perhaps I should rephrase this: Why is it that someone living on a rural acreage must have a state approved woodstove that minimizes emissions, but can go outdoors and burn yard waste straight into the atmosphere unrestricted (while all around huge slash piles are doing the same).
You can't. I can't. You have to check with DEQ, the ODF and your local FD before burning. The DEQ is obviously for emissions, the ODF and FD are for fire danger. For slash burns and ag burning, we are allowed more leeway when it comes to emissions, but "backyard" burning of yard waste is more tightly controlled (or it is supposed to be) and everybody, has to follow burning restrictions when it comes for fire danger.


Also, woodstoves are regulated, requiring certification/testing/etc., because woodstoves are usually used for heating for an extended period of time, not a once a month kind of thing like is done with yard waste.
 
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Love to watch those large burning 'straw stacks', left over from harvesting the lawngrass seeds for yards etc. ! Meanwhile, ranchers etc. pay a 'premium' for straw in other locations. Cheaper to burn than transport! What's that about finding a niche and filling it?
I think they stopped doing that? Now they compost it instead.

Oh man. I'm not even going to try to read these different articles from the past. I don't know what they do now?
 
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Love to watch those large burning 'straw stacks', left over from harvesting the lawngrass seeds for yards etc. ! Meanwhile, ranchers etc. pay a 'premium' for straw in other locations. Cheaper to burn than transport! What's that about finding a niche and filling it?
FWIW:

1) They pretty much do not burn grass or wheat fields anymore. I remember the days when that would cause accidents on I-5 due to the smoke. Now they either plow it under, or do "no till" where they spray and lightly disc it up.

2) The grass from grass fields is more hay than straw. Straw is the left over shafts/stems of wheat/oats/etc. and is only useful for soaking up fecal matter and urine in dairies and horse barns, acting as a barrier and ground in earth moving & construction. Also, in bales as targets for archery/etc.

3) Almost no one pays for straw much less a premium) you might even get paid to haul it away as it is a waste product. Farmers and ranchers will pay a premium for good hay though, as it is feed.

There is a saying "hay is for horses, straw is for S***".
 
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I think they stopped doing that? Now they compost it instead.
Straw is mixed with mixed with fecal matter, ammonia and water to make a mixture that is then packed into bins/trays, cooled (the mixture is hot), once cold enough then spores are spread onto the mixture and mushrooms grow. It is true that mushrooms grow in s*** and darkness - at least on large commercial mushroom farms. I know this from working at the mushroom factory that used to be on state street in Salem - worst job I ever had, very few non-Hispanics worked there, and even they complained. I only lasted about two weeks. It was common for the INS to raid there.
 
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Straw is mixed with mixed with fecal matter, ammonia and water to make a mixture that is then packed into bins/trays, cooled (the mixture is hot), once cold enough then spores are spread onto the mixture and mushrooms grow. It is true that mushrooms grow in s*** and darkness - at least on large commercial mushroom farms. I know this from working at the mushroom factory that used to be on state street in Salem - worst job I ever had, very few non-Hispanics worked there, and even they complained. I only lasted about two weeks. It was common for the INS to raid there.
I thought you were talking about making adobe blocks for a second there
 
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I thought you were talking about making adobe blocks for a second there
When I first worked at that "factory" I worked in the area where they mixed the straw with horse manure and ammonia. They had a special machine on the front of a tractor that mixed it up (IIRC - that was almost 50 years ago). Then I moved to the team that shoveled the compost out of the bins after the mushrooms were harvested. Back breaking work, but tolerable.

Then I moved to the teams that shoveled the mixture of straw/manure/etc. into the bins - that was the worst; that mixture had been sitting for a few days and it was now very hot as in steamy. Inside the buildings, it was 150*F and I am not exaggerating; there was a large thermometer they had hanging up and that is what it read. The steam coming off the mixture was like being pissed on - all your clothes were stained yellow and it smelled like that, while you were working very hard to shovel the mixture from the conveyor belt into the bins as fast as you can. They had huge fans running to keep the temps from getting higher. We had to take breaks, but they were kept short.

Once finished (it would take the better part of a day), then they would close up the building and bring the temps down and turn off the lights inside, then when it was cool enough they would spread the spores and then some time later harvest the mushrooms in the dark (harvesters were a special team and they wore headlights).

I quit after a few days of the loading the bins - I went to picking cherries, which was much less work, not terrible and paid just as well.
 
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I thought you were talking about making adobe blocks for a second there
I remember in 6th grade elementary school we actually made a few Adobe bricks to see how it was done. I lived in Sacramento during my school years. Most of the 6th grade class flew down to SFO on a field trip. Some rode the school bus and visited the Pena Adobe Park in Vacaville, CA, and rode BART when they went 100mph in tunnel under San Francisco Bay. There was a window where could see the driver and train speed and took a tour of the airport.

I flew down first and did the reverse trip so toured the airport, then road BART, and stopped an the Pene Adobe Park before the school bus dropped us off at the school.

We flew PSA from SMF to SFO. Great trip when schools had the money for field trips. But we had a lot of bake sales and fund raisers as well and I believe my parents still had pay a bit of money as well.
 
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There is nothing new under the sun.
I still think smoking killed the dinosaurs.
3tj1yn.jpg
 
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These ninnies soiling themselves over a single heat event aren't worth my time.
The folks in the bigger cities are fine. Plenty of water, electricity and AC. They'll complain but they'll survive. Their livelihoods don't depend on the weather as much as the folks in rural Oregon.

Farmer suicides were already up a lot prior to COVID, and drought is going to make it worse: https://www.npr.org/2021/07/02/1011...west-could-mean-an-increase-in-farmer-suicide

Plenty of people in rural Oregon are running their wells dry: https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2021/08/02/water-wells-drought-oregon/5447782001/
 
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The folks in the bigger cities are fine. Plenty of water, electricity and AC. They'll complain but they'll survive. Their livelihoods don't depend on the weather as much as the folks in rural Oregon.

Farmer suicides were already up a lot prior to COVID, and drought is going to make it worse: https://www.npr.org/2021/07/02/1011...west-could-mean-an-increase-in-farmer-suicide

Plenty of people in rural Oregon are running their wells dry: https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2021/08/02/water-wells-drought-oregon/5447782001/
Hard to believe a suckerfish is more important than a human being
 

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