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Med Kit

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by Iansstud, Mar 13, 2010.

  1. Iansstud

    Iansstud SW WA / PDX Member

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    Im Going through my Med Kit (the large one, not my blowout kit) and was thinking of adding a couple more IV kits. Has anyone ever shoped here?

    http://www.chinookmed.com/cgi-bin/category.cgi?item=01352&source=froogle

    It looks like an OK price for just getting 2 kits, My wife said that it was a ripoff because she orders this stuff in bulk, but for 1-2 kits she said it would be worth it!

    I have a source for my 500ml and 1L Salene bags so I wont be getting them here...

    has anyone ever delt with this company before?

    Thanks-
     
  2. 56kninja

    56kninja Portland Member

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    Never dealt with them, wondering what you need IV kits for? And if your wife has more experience, I'd say go with her opinion.
     
  3. 3 AE

    3 AE Oregon Member

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    I have purchased just about everything from chinookmeds to put together trauma/blowout kits for my home and cars.I based mine on the USMC IFAK's.I also purchased items from them to put together a comprehensive first aid kit based on the first aid kit recommendations by Doug Ritter from his Equipped to Survive website. Yes,items cost more when purchased in small quantities. That's the way it goes. Bulk is the way to go if you can get more people in on the deal. I find Chinook Meds a reputable company to deal with. The prices are fair,I've never had anything backordered,and the deliveries were prompt.
     
  4. Iansstud

    Iansstud SW WA / PDX Member

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    Just what I was looking for!!! Thanks!!!


    Hydration / Fluid loss..... What do you use IV kits for???

    Seriously though, its for SHTF situations, Backpacking accident to Zombies Its always nice to have it and not need it!!!


    (Im an EMT, My Wife is a Nurse so we know how to use em!)


    THANKS!!!
     
  5. MikeIsh

    MikeIsh Portland Member

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    RN, so that is how you are buying without a prescription? I thought IV supplies were scheduled?
    just wondering
     
  6. 56kninja

    56kninja Portland Member

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    Do they let basics run IVs in Washington, or are you just an intermediate or paramedic level? (This is just a question out of curiosity)

    I just would hate to see someone who thought "Seen it done in a movie!" and try to start an IV on a person and manage to hurt or kill someone.
     
  7. MarkAd

    MarkAd Port Orchard Well-Known Member

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    There are different levels of EMT in WA.
    I was a basic EMT.
    EMT-I can do sticks
     
  8. 56kninja

    56kninja Portland Member

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    There's different levels of EMT everywhere.

    Thanks for explaining however.
     
  9. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    seen the thread and got kinda scared thinking the same thing at first.. :bluelaugh:
     
  10. MikeIsh

    MikeIsh Portland Member

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    As an Oregon paramedic, I am not under a physician adviser off duty. Thus I would be breaking the law starting an IV on someone. However if it is my family, I wouldn't hesitate to initiate lifesaving care.
    I am not versed in the RN's legaleze thus I don't know if an RN could work independently away from work.

    just my thoughts
     
  11. Iansstud

    Iansstud SW WA / PDX Member

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    Im a EMT-I, I can do some invasive but mostly the same as an EMT-B. Im no longer with a Dept. Because of too many hours at work effecting training)

    I DO NOT plan on starting an IV on the general public, This is for my family ONLY.

    Anyone can buy that kit. There are no meds with it, it's just the Saline lock/ IV setup. I think it will save me some time, having it all in one Kit. I wont be searching the Net looking for this and that. Plus its sealed!!!

    Im also looking at the sucher kit they offer... I dont plan on getting any Local ansethetic because:

    A, I dont have a means to legally obtain it/ or possess it.

    B, the stuff expires, and The Wifey says it gets weak then after a year, it stops working (she worked for a scumbag Dr. that would use expried drugs to save $$$, and thats one of the many many reasons she left that DB) I plan on using it for SHTF type stuffs

    Thanks
     
  12. 56kninja

    56kninja Portland Member

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    I think an RN can get away more. I know that a NP certainly could at least(but then again NPs, are practically docotors..) .
     
  13. 56kninja

    56kninja Portland Member

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    It's good to have the suture kits though for the really bad situations where stitches are needed, but there's no way to get medical care.

    I've taken sutures in between my fingers that weren't numbed in a few parts. It hurts, but it's not agonizing.
     
  14. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    I've posted this before, but more than 1/2 of all of our meds are now made in India. Looking for forums on the subject will bring up good resources. There are ads all over google, but the forums know where the deals are, and who's legit.

    We buy penicillin and suture kits at the Grange Co-op. We also get syringes there. It's perfectly legal to doctor your own animals. I buy penicillin pills and other things from India. You can get just about anything you want.

    Before penicillin and sulfa drugs, more wounded people died of infection than from the wound itself.

    It's also good to have lots of salt and sugar to make up a basic electrolyte drink if the patient can take enough orally.

    Although my wife is now in administration, she's also an RN, MS. If the SHTF who's going to follow the "rules" if someone is going to die without care?
     
  15. Lange22250

    Lange22250 Milwaukie Active Member

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    IMHO it's better to order the stuff individually. That type of kit assumes a 1-1 usage for an application. It's not that way in real life so you see a lot of waste because you don't use everything in the kit or you will need more of one thing in the kit and need to open up another.
    I would order a selection of caths from 16g-20g.
    A few sets and extensions.
    Extra interlink, or other system, adaptors. These would be particularly important because you can leave your IV in place and keep disconnecting the bag.
    A box of gloves, bio occlusive dressings and gauze sponges as these are also good for other applications. Tape of course and if you go with cordasilk you can get the 2inch and just rip it down for the application you need instead of carrying multiple rolls.
    Iodine and alcohol wipes. Remember that the alcohol is for mechanical cleaning only and the iodine (or other) is for cleaning pathogens from the site and when diluted it can be used for general wound care.
    A couple of TK's to round it out.
    If you really want kits just get a Seal-a-Meal machine and make your own, just remember to put the soonest expiration date on the outside.

    Oh, and in real life if it's just you immediate family and friends all the rules about scope of practice and when you can practice go out the window. Particularly true in a SHTF.
    Remember that there is always the possibility of some sort of blow back if you have the wrong type of people as immediate family or friends so think about it carefully.
     
  16. coctailer

    coctailer Portland, OR/Hastings, MI/Vancouver,WA I run with scissors.

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    I've never done an IV, but I bet I could figure it out.

    Heroine addicts seem to have no problem hitting a vein even when they are drunk.

    I would try doing an IV with no experience if I knew that person would die without it.
     
  17. 56kninja

    56kninja Portland Member

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    But it can still be dangerous. I've never done it, but just think that EMT Basics here and in most places aren't allowed to do IVs. There's a reason behind. Which is mostly liability, but more or less it's because it's better to have someone skilled and practiced (not something EMT Basics get a lot of in training) doing it.

    But particularly with lay people, you need to know WHY and WHEN you should run an IV, not just how to do it.
     
  18. Lange22250

    Lange22250 Milwaukie Active Member

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    IV access can be very difficult, harder than just spiking a vein. And junkies seem to do a good job of bubbleguming that up on a regular basis.
    Getting a line on a person when they really need it is a lot harder than when they are healthy.
    If the person is really in bad shape the military is now using an IO device, fluid into the middle of a bone, as a first line.


    Edit: I would never say "bubble gumming". I don't know where that edit came from.
     
  19. 56kninja

    56kninja Portland Member

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    Chat filter on the website.

    I've heard some fire departments, are using IO devices.. And it's on Scope of Practice for Intermediates and Paramedics here In Oregon I think.
     
  20. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    A person might most need an IV when he is dehydrated or has significant blood loss and is needing fluids and electrolytes. That's when it's hardest to find a vein. Hospitals have phlebotomists who specialize in that. When the ER RN (who's had lots of training and practice) can't find or "hit" a vein, they call the phlebotomist. That most often happens with trauma patients and elderly patients but it can be anyone. Some people just have veins that are more "hidden."

    We recently had a relative in the ER. Neither of the two RN's in the ER could hit a vein for the IV. They called the phlebotomist and she hit one on the first try.

    Wouldn't hurt to know the difference between a vein and an artery either. :)

    If a person wanted to know how to do that, this would be a good time to use google if willing to try under any circumstances.

    $.02

    PS I don't really know how - my wife's an RN, MS and can do it just fine. I too would be willing to wing it but I wouldn't know which one to use. Sodium? Dextrose? Both? What signs to watch for??

    I guess you can always go with D5W, LOL. :)