Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Lee manual oal/min oal data

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by warren57, May 1, 2013.

  1. warren57

    warren57 Denver, Colorado New Member

    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    2
    At the beginning of each cartridge load info, there is a picture showing cartridge dimensions. The oal is greater than the min oal shown for the specific bullet data.
    At the beginning of the 45 acp section the length is shown as 1.275. In the specific data info, the length for a 200 grain lead bullet (with autocomp powder) shows the min oal at 1.225. Am I correct in thinking the first length is max oal?

    I'm using Ranier HP bullets for the first time and the length needs to be close to the min oal shown to work in the magazine. The taper in the bullet nose is so great, if I approach the OAL shown in the picture, the cartridges jam on an angle in the magazine. At min oal, the angle doesn't have an issue.
     
  2. Shooter98

    Shooter98 McMinnville, Or. Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    18
    Yes, first measurement is max o.a.l. anything more and it probably wont fit in the mag.DONT follow the picture, use load data! According to Winchesters site, the o.al. with any bullet using a hp is 1.200. That's .025 less than what you're using. You didn't say which grain bullet, but if you're using less than a 230 then your oal will be even less. Cartridge Loads - Hodgdon Reloading Data Center - data.hodgdon.com

    Well, the confusing part is there's c.o.a.l and o.a.l. C.o.a.l. is measured from the tip of the bullet, and o.a.l. is measured from the ogive, which requires a special tool called a comparator Hornady Lock-N-Load Bullet Comparator Basic Set 6 Inserts
     
  3. Shooter98

    Shooter98 McMinnville, Or. Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    18
    I will also say that 45 acp is a tricky round to learn to load with. You do not need to put a crimp on 45 acp. You will only want to open up the brass enough for the bullet to seat then you will want to seat the bullet with just enough tension to hold the bullet firmly. 45 builds up crazy pressure when you crimp the bullets in tight. If you find your pistol doesn't function well and you do need to crimp, then try using the Lee crimp die. It puts just a slight taper crimp on.
     
  4. warren57

    warren57 Denver, Colorado New Member

    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    2
    shooter98, so is the oal (Win site) a min length?
    I'm using the lee factory crimp die in the 4 pc die set.
     
  5. Shooter98

    Shooter98 McMinnville, Or. Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    18
    No, that's their recommended oal. As you get more comfy reloading those rounds you can move the bullet in and out slightly to customize the rounds for how well they work in your pistol. That's fine using the 4th die, just make sure you put a very light crimp on it and no more. I stopped crimping my 45's, and just made sure the sidewalls were back to square or just under by .001" or so.
     
  6. nwbobber

    nwbobber Longview, Wa. Active Member

    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    93
    Generally the cartridge OAL is a minimum, going below that can cause unexpected pressure increases. The case capacity and bullet shape all affect this so work up carefully, if you make a change in length.
     
  7. warren57

    warren57 Denver, Colorado New Member

    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    2
    nwbobber- Yes, in the lee manual it actually says min OAL. So as long as I stay longer than that and shorter than the max shown in their picture I should be fine.
    Loaded a dozen rounds, going to take them out as soon as it stops snowing...
     
  8. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    537
    When it comes to OAL, there are three. The Lee Manual lists the "Minimum" that is recommended to make sure that the load isn't overpressured by a bullet seated too deeply. The next OAL is the "Design" OAL that relates to the overall cartridge design. SAAMI drawings will usually show this number. The third OAL is the one that is determined by the bullet you use and the firearm you shoot it in. Different bullets have different profiles and will have different clearances in the chamber, which in itself can vary due to the various reamer dimensions.

    As for any "recommended" OAL's these will all be dependent on the bullet and the firearm it is meant to be used in.

    There is no hard and fast OAL unless it is given for specific bullets.