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I am having difficulty finding clarity on where I can shoot something that moves? HA! More specifically, rabbits, etc. that you can hunt all year long. Some of you know I am quite new and online information doesn't seem to exist. I recently got a Oregon Big Game Hunting Regulations 2019 magazine, thinking I might find information or links. I have looked on ODFW, BLM, USDA forestry, Mount Hood National Forest, etc. I keep being referred elsewhere, like everyone wants to pass the buck. Okay, what's the big secret that I am not getting? Are all of these sites afraid that environmental whacko's will give them a hard time for telling us where we can hunt? So, if I venture on to BLM land, is it a given that I can hunt if there are no prohibitive signage. Really, I wouldn't just assume and fire away! After all, that's why I am starting this thread. I have been a gun owner less than 30 days and rules and regulations are not totally clear! To be honest, it is frustrating as hell! Because I am a new gun owner and lack knowledge about the laws concerning gun use, I sure as heck don't want to receive a citation over firing my gun where it is not allowed! Incidentally, I am taking a gun safety course in March (FYI). Is there a link that spells out where to hunt, because everything is vague as hell! No need to direct me to the ODFW interactive map, as that only refers to very distant locations. I live in Happy Valley, Oregon, and I can't believe that I have to drive 100 miles (slight exaggeration) to shoot at rabbits, crows, deer (only joking--not ready to lose my hunting privileges), squirrels, varmints, etc!
 
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There are hunting rules and regs and there are firearm rules and regs for each of the public lands listed.

I recommend you go to a sporting goods store and grab the free ODFW hunting booklets. There are 3-4 of them and the go over a lot of the questions you have.

I also recommend you go back to each of the public lands websites and review their recreational shooting and firearms regulations.
 
Seems you're overthinking this.
The hunting regs outline zones and the state regulations for those zones, based on species, etc.
In Happy Valley, you are 25 miles from Mt. Hood National Forest. If you want to get to high plains hunting, the Rez adds a few miles to your drive. There are lots of BLM lands too, but you can only hunt on the ones that (a) you can access without trespassing on other lands, and (b) they are not under a lease, such as Longview Fiber or Weyerhauser.
Some of those areas may also be under hunting restriction for public safety.

There's plenty of areas to hunt, but they may not be that good.
For example, a co-worker has access to 400 acres for hunting. I asked about coyotes and he said it wasn't good there. Asked why, and his response, "we have a very healthy raptor population, and so very little rodents and rabbits. Consequently, coyotes aren't a problem for us." Doesn't mean they aren't there, just means they are good at being hidey, sneaky bastiges.
With the woman being killed by the cougar on the trail out behind the Zig Zag ranger station, cougars have been systematically hunted in the area, and now it's closed to cougar tags. The fact that she was attacked by a cougar may indicate the smaller mammals and hoofed population are also under pressure.
Ideally, talk to other sportsmen, practice and hone your skill, go scouting and establish a hunting protocol.

[edit to add]
Good idea on hunter education. That's a great place to start.
@clearconscience 's suggestion to get OnX is spot on. I use it, it's amazing as far as hunting units, land ownership, public lands, etc.
As far as "getting on public lands and blasting away," don't be a dumbazz. Recon an area, know where it's good and not a good idea to shoot, assiduously practice safety and respect when you are out hunting.
 
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Thanks, everyone. I'm well aware that I am the mentee and many of you are my mentors. Understand, though, I'm being free with my thoughts, which is no indication of my intentions. Common sense tells me don't shoot your shotgun unless you are absolutely certain it is permissible! I am going to take the hunter's education class in March and don't plan to go out prior. I would prefer to go with a seasoned hunter, so, there's plenty of time for that to happen. Six months ago, I started reading about the best affordable shotgun. I didn't buy my first gun until near the end of January. I also had been reading about .22's and recently made my choice. Some of you influenced my decision to improve my shooting skills and I purchased a .22 three days ago. I am retired, so I've done a boatload of reading as well as asking questions on this forum and overly trusting gun personnel at sporting goods stores (it's okay to laugh at me). When I hear they own a number of guns and are avid hunters, I listen to them. Hell, they know a lot more than I do! Recently, a gun clerk shared being a bowhunter and using onx. In fact, they asked me to look the app up on my phone, and said, "If you're serious about hunting, consider downloading the app." Obviously, the gun clerk gave me good advice. Some of you have been in this sport awhile, but I'm just starting out. I appreciate everyone's patience while I get gun savvy. No doubt, guns and hunting is your second nature. I am nowhere close to being there yet! I don't have the luxury of a relative to teach me the ropes, so I'm very much on my own. Like the old Bartles and James ad, "Thanks for your support!" :)
 
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Welcome to Oregon....

It takes years to learn the regs; yeeeeaaars!

Take the online Idaho Hunter Safety courses too. They have excellent courses for archery and firearms.

Join Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) and attend the club meetings in your county; meet ppl F2F and ask questions.

Respect private property!

Follow the IFPLs before goung into private timber.

Oregon Department of Forestry Industrial Fire Restrictions

Industrial
Fire
Protection
Levels

Don't be "that guy" who starts the next wildfire.
 
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One thing that nobody mentions is time. You can spend weeks and weeks scouting a legal spot to have it shut down the day you go out. You can spend whole days doing nothing but checking gates to roads that "should" be open for use.

I've been trying to get a goose for a few weeks now and can't get a public place that allows it, and when I have they don't open until after sunrise so no setting up early.

Hopefully you can meet up with someone and have them help you out. I believe a lot of people take the knowledge and experience they got from parents/grandparents for granted.

Hit up as many forums as you can and soak up what you can. Be ready to hear "it's easy just take your gun and go" and " just spend some more time in the field" A LOT. It's good advice but can be frustrating when you want guidance and have reached a point where going solo isnt enough
 
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I had great luck hunting rabbits at EE Wilson. Never saw many people there. Lots of rabbits. The dogs (beagles) had a blast. Been a few years since I have been there but something to look into.
 
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Send to BLM for their Oregon state BLM map about 30” sq.
When you find an area of interest, go to an Oregon State Forestry Office and buy an appropriate fire district road map(not sure if that is the exact name).
Both are not that much$, but have great detail. Hours of study and scouting.
 
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Thanks, everyone. I'm well aware that I am the mentee and many of you are my mentors. Understand, though, I'm being free with my thoughts, which is no indication of my intentions. Common sense tells me don't shoot your shotgun unless you are absolutely certain it is permissible! I am going to take the hunter's education class in March and don't plan to go out prior. I would prefer to go with a seasoned hunter, so, there's plenty of time for that to happen. Six months ago, I started reading about the best affordable shotgun. I didn't buy my first gun until near the end of January. I also had been reading about .22's and recently made my choice. Some of you influenced my decision to improve my shooting skills and I purchased a .22 three days ago. I am retired, so I've done a boatload of reading as well as asking questions on this forum and overly trusting gun personnel at sporting goods stores (it's okay to laugh at me). When I hear they own a number of guns and are avid hunters, I listen to them. Hell, they know a lot more than I do! Recently, a gun clerk shared being a bowhunter and using onx. In fact, they asked me to look the app up on my phone, and said, "If you're serious about hunting, consider downloading the app." Obviously, the gun clerk gave me good advice. Some of you have been in this sport awhile, but I'm just starting out. I appreciate everyone's patience while I get gun savvy. No doubt, guns and hunting is your second nature. I am nowhere close to being there yet! I don't have the luxury of a relative to teach me the ropes, so I'm very much on my own. Like the old Bartles and James ad, "Thanks for your support!" :)

I decided to start hunting just about as the same time as you. Would love to get into rabbits, pheasants, ducks, and other small game to start out. I bought a 12 gauge earlier this year. I've been looking for ways of finding a hunting mentor and its definitely not easy.
 
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East Hebo is where I hunt as well.
On serious note.
Little time on google, few different sites and you should be golden!
As mentioned on X is great. Some free apps as well.
You can also get a gps with a state specific chip And it will tell you if it’s private or public.
“Posted”usually means it’s private and stay off.
What 22 did you buy?
 
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Went out today to take my shotgun for a walk in the forest. Always on the lookout for rabbits but ended up hearing something amazing while out........A Gobble! Also followed a deer path and looked for sheds(no luck still) but with that gobble and the amazing ealk. It was a good morning
 
Most of my hunting is on public land and one thing to remember is that it is Public land...

I have often come across folks during hunting season , out enjoying the same pubic land as I am ...but are totally unaware of it being hunting season.

It pays in the long run when running into these folks :
To be polite...
As well as being very mindful as to how you present yourself...
And exercise excellent muzzle / trigger finger discipline...
Perhaps even unloading before , you approach them.
Andy
 
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East Hebo is where I hunt as well.
On serious note.
Little time on google, few different sites and you should be golden!
As mentioned on X is great. Some free apps as well.
You can also get a gps with a state specific chip And it will tell you if it’s private or public.
“Posted”usually means it’s private and stay off.
What 22 did you buy?
Ruger 10-22
 
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I have a large yard and until I had it completely fenced (feral pigs would it root it up so badly at times it looked plowed in huge patches) I would shoot feral pigs from my back porch, skin em, gut em and eat em. I used a .17 cal rifle doing head shots with fmj's. DRT.

Also, before the fence, I had coyotes, skunks, possums, visit.

Now, I still have coons visit at night, doing no harm I might add, armadillos who do some damage to my yard, and tons of rabbits and cat squirrels.

I don't shoot any of em.

Why not?

My nearest neighbor feeds the rabbits. He loves em like pets, so I don't find it ethical to shoot a baited rabbit that quite possibly has wandered out his yard into mine...plus, I've turned into an old softie.

In prior times, I've successfully hunted deer, quail, dove, squirrel, rabbit, heck, I just looked out my window and see one rabbit and a ton of squirrels.

I just can't shoot em...with one caveat. If squirrels get in my attic, then I'll have to perform capital punishment, so far after 14 years no squirrels in the attic, but...bats in my belfry, sure..
 
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Most of my hunting is on public land and one thing to remember is that it is Public land...

I have often come across folks during hunting season , out enjoying the same pubic land as I am ...but are totally unaware of it being hunting season.

It pays in the long run when running into these folks :
To be polite...
As well as being very mindful as to how you present yourself...
And exercise excellent muzzle / trigger finger discipline...
Perhaps even unloading before , you approach them.
Andy
It is amazing to learn about the government land that is near me. In the near future, I plan to visit the Mt Hood National Forest Headquarters in Sandy, Oregon to glean what I can.
 

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