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How much info do states share?

Discussion in 'Legal & Political Archive' started by Noah Vale, Apr 25, 2010.

  1. Noah Vale

    Noah Vale PDX New Member

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    So if I get pulled over here in OR, it is considered prudent to inform/show the officer that I have a CHL, as they will find out such when they run my record. Now if I were to get pulled over in another state (for this scenario let's call it a state that doesn't reckognize OR CHL). Do I need to inform the officer of my chl? Basically, do non-OR LEOs have info about that sort of thing? Not sure how much states share info, and I don't wanna share anymore than neccesary. Thanks.
     
  2. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Whether or not you have a CHL, and in any state most officers would appreciate your immediately advising them of any firearms that are within your reach and whether or not they are loaded/location of ammo, etc.

    It is my practice to accomplish this when asked for my DL, and I hand the officer that and the CHL. Fortunately, the opportunity to engage this practice has not been a regular occurrence for me, but the officer almost without fail has thanked me for this information, and on one occasion it initiated a conversation about guns and hunting, and resulted in no ticket (I really deserved one).
     
  3. The Quiet Man

    The Quiet Man rural Washington County, Oregon Active Member

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    I agree with Spitpatch in Oregon, even though it is not required by law. However, CHL disclosure is required by law in some states. I doubt you need to offer the fact that you have an Oregon CHL if you are not carrying and not licensed in that other state but it is a good question.

    As to the issue of information sharing, we would need a non-Oregon LEO or dispatcher to help with the question of how much info Oregon makes available to the national LEO computer system. I suspect the quantity of information changes over time and varies from state to state. When Oregon began requiring a SSN to obtain a drivers license, some Oregon LEO's incorrectly thought they would have access to them because the DMV had them in their databank. However, the DMV did not release anyone's SSN, at least on purpose. I'm not sure if that has changed. That said, I regularly hear dispatchers giving out people's SSN over the air to LEO's in the field so they get some SSN's from somewhere. I assume that once you are arrested for anything, your SSN is part of the LEO database and thus available to dispatchers? I didn't provide mine to Oregon or Washington when I got my CHL's so anyone who did the same is likely safe from that prospective, but that's a different issue. I do hear license checks called in on non-Oregon drivers on a regular basis. If the state that issued the person's drivers license makes the info available it is reported to the LEO. I mostly hear of CDL's and the occasional outstanding warrant. I suspect most states also have an evolving database system that changes on a regular basis.

    Now back to your concern when being out of state. If you are legally carrying outside Oregon, you should be knowledgable in the laws of that state and abide by them. If not required, informing a LEO of your legally armed status is certainly a polite/prudent gesture. If you are illegally carrying in another state, you're butt could very belong to the arresting officer if Oregon releases the fact that you have an Oregon CHL. Hopefully, someone with direct knowledge of Oregon's practices will help us out.
     
  4. Noah Vale

    Noah Vale PDX New Member

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    Yeah, in OR, carrying or not I inform the officer that I have a chl and then add that I'm carrying and where the firearm is on my person. Same would be the case were I in a state I could legally carry. Wouldn't carry where I couldn't. Not that dumb. I just don't want them coming back from their car with pistols drawn cause they were able to see I have a chl from another state and didn't report as such.
     
  5. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    There are three databases that are accessed when an Oregon dispatcher runs an Oregon DL. DMV of course, and then LEDS (Law Enforcement Data System) for Oregon, and NCIC (from the feds).

    From DMV The Oregon DL record shows, and then from LEDS the CHL (valid, denied, revoked), any warrants/restraining orders/firearm prohibitions, probation status, sex offender registration, etc.

    The federal (NCIC) response shows federal probation /parole, federal warrants, other state warrants, terrorist alerts, etc.

    An out of state CHL is not displayed in the normal course of events, but an officer can certainly determine if one is held, and then determine if it is valid in Oregon as a result of interstate reciprocity.

    Whether or not an Oregon CHL is displayed for non-Oregon dispatchers, I cannot answer.

    Again, the best way to deal with a police officer is not to surprise them, or have them find out something they were not told about.
     
  6. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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    In WA we are not required to inform and I will not unless requested, as per state law
     
  7. gogoDawgs

    gogoDawgs Federal Way, WA Active Member

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    Why would you inform the officer that you have a CHL and/or are carrying?

    Do you inform the officer of all of your other items in the car? Officer I have a dozen eggs in the car. Officer I have a six pack of beer in the car? What do any of these items, including a firearm, have to do with a moving violation?

    Do you expect to be treated differently than others? Why?


    Personally, I put my hands ontop of the steering wheel, I roll down the window only a few inches and ask the officer "is there a problem, officer?"

    I give him/her what he asks for, DL, proof of insurance and registration. Then after the warning, I go on my way.
     
  8. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

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    Informing an LEO that I have a concealed carry license immediately lets him/her know that they are dealing with a person who isn't or has never been a gangbanger, felon, drug pusher, or other assorted trash. Required or no, its a good thing to do IMO. One morning a few weeks ago on a rural WA road I did a rather fast rolling stop through a stopsign and hit almost 75mph in a 55mph zone before the witnessing officer pulled me over. I was on my way to work, dressed in dirty Carhaarts, wearing a dew rag under a black knit watchcap and had out-of-state plates on my car. Plus I was acting unusually panicky as I had had a dead battery and was late for work. I gave the county sherrif my driver's license, registration, both OR and WA concealed carry permits and let him know I was carrying a concealed weapon. He let me go with a warning within about 2 minutes. Whether his decision to let me go was related in any way to my offering both carry permits I don't know, but I'm sure it didn't hurt.

    Keith
     
  9. 2zuks

    2zuks Dallas, Oregon Member

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    I do not tell them that I concealed carry. I just treat it as if it shouldn't be a problem. If they run my license and figure out that i have my concealed carry license, then they should also know that I am not a gang banger, felon, or any of those other things. I respect that they carry a gun for their protection and to keep our streets safe, and they can respect the same thing with me.
     
  10. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Train touched on something that I meant to, and thanks to him for that.

    Indeed, in my experience with police officers (greater than very few on this site, I would gather) a CHL by and large tells the officer immediately that you are a good guy. He knows you've had a background check upon issue, and nothing you've done since has added "color" to your history. Your honesty and concern for his safety by advising him of your weapon situation makes you at that point a partner in a transaction, and clears you as any potential threat. Your cards are on the table. Don't forget that he holds the ace.

    Nothing excites an officer more than a surprise. I like to prevent surprises and I don't deal well with excited police officers. I can fully understand another's protection of his privacy and if that works for you, stick with it.

    However, If he's an officer that has a corncob in regions where the sun doesn't shine, he'll find a reason to ask you out of the car, and if he finds something you haven't prevented surprises for, your experience will be a negative one.

    All the laws on the books, including the United States Constitution will not stop your negative experience from happening in that time frame. If you are in the right, you can hope for a judge that is somewhat unsympathetic toward cops. The negative experience has still happened.

    I am proud of my CHL, and that I have done nothing to preclude mine being issued. For me, the secrecy is employed toward bad guys and with respect to those in our society of a "sensitive nature" about such things. They are the sheep, the bad guys are the wolves, and I am the shepherd with a little more than a staff in my hand.
     
  11. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

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    I hear you on what you are saying, and I would (usually) be of the dispostion to disclose my CHL status as well under those circumstances. WAAaaaaay back in early 90's I was arrested (several weeks after the fact) for assault/menacing charges for beating the crap out of an individual (actually broke his back, and fractured his neck bones) who I caught red-handed breaking into my house. The cops knew I had a CHL and asked if I has carrying (I wasn't), and there was no drama whatsoever... the assault charges were ultimately dismissed, but wudda hassle!!

    The only "hole" I can "poke" into your reasoning (I lack the energy past that... LOL) is that surrendering your legal rights to a cop who may be "having a bad day" just to "get through it" could be construed as anathema to some, although I fully agree with your premise about being a "partner in a transaction" and I actually see it as ASSISTING the cop to do his/her job, which IMO we ALL have a duty to do. :thumbup:
     
  12. The Quiet Man

    The Quiet Man rural Washington County, Oregon Active Member

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    So we are right back to where Noah started this. No one knows if Oregon releases CHL info to any database(s) for access by non-Oregon LEO's making traffic stops. I am still interested in the answer to that.

    Oh, and thanks for the good database info, Spitpatch. I have been an avid scanner listener for a long time but never knew exactly what was available from where. Very interesting.

    I am a little surprised we haven't had a tinfoil-hat person insisting every state submits CHL info to NCIC so the feds can hover black helos over our houses :)