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best starter weapons for competitive shooting?

Discussion in 'Competitive Shooting' started by x1hunter89, Mar 24, 2011.

  1. x1hunter89

    x1hunter89 gresham oregon Active Member

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    what do u think the best rifle and pistol would be for competitive shooting for a beginner?
     
  2. Kid@Heart

    Kid@Heart Vancouver, USA Cynic Lifetime Supporter Diamond Supporter

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    Daisy Red Rider.
     
  3. BillM

    BillM Amity OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    What kind of competition?
     
  4. HollisOR

    HollisOR Rural OR, South of Dallas Active Member

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    ^^^ that will dictate what you look at. Go to a few comps, see what others are using, that will greatly reduce the field in the way of choices.
     
  5. x1hunter89

    x1hunter89 gresham oregon Active Member

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    ok thanks
     
  6. addiction

    addiction Monroe Wa Active Member

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    I would say the best starter weapon is one you own, you know it, and that way the operation of the weapon will not get in the way of learning the sport you are taking up. Once you decide you like it, then go shopping. Are you taking USPSA, IDPA, bullseye shooting, long distance rifles like CMP, etc.....would also help.

    Plus pay close attention to the classifications, there are differences in the rules, some people like more production level shooting and other like modifying the guns a lot, and that will effect your class selection.
     
  7. m469699

    m469699 Beaverton Member

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    +1 Addiction!
    Also, there are regional preferences. You'll see that when you attend the matches.
     
  8. lonegunman

    lonegunman Eastern Washington Active Member

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    +1 on go see for yourself. Are you wanting to compete or shoot? Your first gun is not going to be the gun you end up with in almost every case.
     
  9. drew

    drew OR Well-Known Member

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    He'll shoot his eye out. But like the other posts have said it depends on what you're doing. Go see what others are using in the competitions you're looking at.
     
  10. live2hunt

    live2hunt Portland Member

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    Just buy one of everything!
     
  11. ron

    ron Vancouver, Washington Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

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    I shoot NRA High Power Rifle matches almost every weekend in the Portland area. Some matches we shoot with WW 2 rifles like Garands. Clubs in the area have Garand matches open to the Public. Clubs also have M-1 rifles to loan and ball ammo for sale to be used only at matches. Tri-county, Douglas Ridge, Clark Rifles and Estacada are some of the clubs that have rifles available. You can try it out to see if you would like to pursue it further. And you can qualify to purchase a M-1 from the CMP. Slow fire and rapid fire from 3 different shooting position. Standard National match Course is shot (with iron sights) at 200-300-600 yards. Currently the AR rules 'Service Rifle Class'. More info at OSSA.org ,Oregon State Shooting Association. Very challenging and fun sport shot all across the nation. GET OUT THERE AND SHOOT
     
  12. moose

    moose northwet coast Well-Known Member

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    Fixed it for you.
     
    rrojohnso and (deleted member) like this.
  13. BillM

    BillM Amity OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    x1---FWIW, the regular monthly Speed Steel match at Tri County Gun Club is tomorrow. Might be worth a look. Lots of fun, you can shoot with a 22 pistol or rifle. Take some eye and ear protection an go watch the match. Friendly bunch of people. They typically get 60-70 competitors.
    PM me with any questions if you are interested.
     
  14. miletwo

    miletwo Gresham, Oregon Member

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    +1 The one you own. Nothing like getting comfortable with what you have first then building your collection from there.
     
  15. 44magyota

    44magyota oregon Member

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    I bought a xdm 9mm for comp shooting. It easily holds it own for a decent price. And does not cost two arms and a leg like the high end comp pistols do.
     
  16. MrNiceGuy

    MrNiceGuy between springfield and shelbyville Well-Known Member

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    The answer is, whatever gun you shoot the best.

    There is no right answer. In competition I was able to beat out $2,000+ kimber 1911's with my $500 plastic beretta with rotating barrel. On paper, they had me beat, in the end I won.
     
  17. Topmaul

    Topmaul Seatac Washington New Member

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    I would say before you sink a ton of money in to fire arms you make sure you like the sport and will be enjoying it for a long time. First I'd get a used pistol that you can find high quality magazines for at a reasonable price. If it was me I'd get a used Glock (can't belive I said that). I bought a used Beretta 92 and still use it once I put decent sites on the gun I can't complain about it at all.
    As for a semi-automatic Rifle? I started out with a Cast Olympic Arms Plinker it has an A1 carry handle the truth is the gun has been accurate and reliable for years I just recently upgraded to an AR I pretty much built. My son use to use a Saiga .223 with Galil mags and did very well with it until he lost interest in shooting.

    It is almost always the Indian not the Bow that counts so what ever you get make sure it's a gun that you can afford to shoot alot. Get comfortable with the weapons and be safe.
     
  18. dan10mmman

    dan10mmman puget sound Member

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    You know one question leads to so many more..........What training/experience do you have? have you got large or small hands? Are you recoil sensitive? Which part of the wonderful world of shooting are you wanting to try? How much can you afford to spend on ammo on a regular basis? There are so many possiblities. Topmaul's advice is right on the money. Buy a Glock, or a Witness, or...... Go to some matches in your area, you will meet some real nice folks that love to share thier enthusiasm about the guns they like. The Olympic Arms AR's are an excellent place to start. In my experience their customer service is second to none. I love their pistol caliber uppers. Just switch the upper half the gun by pulling two pins and your 556 can be a 7.62x39, or a 45acp, or a 10mm.....
     
  19. CAL30M1

    CAL30M1 Longview, WA Active Member

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    If you are interested in shooting long rifles competitively, a good starting point would be competing in a CMP affiliated John C. Garand match.
    Lone Oak in Longview has 3 scheduled this year. They have loaner M1 rifles if you don't have one of your own to shoot.

    Check out this website for more information.
    Lone Oak Rifle Pistol Club
     
  20. Trip4x4

    Trip4x4 Portland New Member

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    I'm very new to competitive shooting myself, and having done my first match yesterday, I have come to realize that sub-compact weapons, specifically short barelled weapons can both benefit you, and hurt you. The benefit is in movement, when standing behind a barricade inside a shooters box, not having to sweep your feet, or break the 180 rule is crucial, however, shorter barrels also give you a shorter sight radius, which when you're still shooting front sight only (no, this does not mean I ignore the rear sight) it can be harder to find quickly.

    It seems that 3 inch is too short, 5 inch is too long... so perhaps a 4 inch? I would test this theory prior to buying a 4 inch gun, first. Hope it helps.