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backed out primers?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by coosbaycreep, Mar 29, 2010.

  1. coosbaycreep

    coosbaycreep 9 miles South of Roseburg Active Member

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    I was just tumbling some .303 british brass, and noticed that almost all the cases from factory 180gr remington had primers that were partially backed out of the case.

    All the cases from winchester factory ammo were still flush like they should be.

    Any ideas on what's wrong?
     
  2. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

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    Were the Winchesters 180gr also?
    COLs the same between the two?
    Are the bullet ogives similar?
    If the answer(s) to these is no, I would check the throat depth. If the Rems are in the lands that could spike the pressures and back primers out.
    Other than that, are both the same general age/condition?
     
  3. coosbaycreep

    coosbaycreep 9 miles South of Roseburg Active Member

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    The winchesters were 180gr also, but they're spitzer, and the remingtons are round nose, so maybe that's the problem. The round noses don't feed hardly either.

    I don't know the COL because I shot up all the ammo I had.

    I think all of this ammo was probably from the '70s or early '80s, but it seemed to have been stored properly (no misfires, no corrosion or anything on them).
     
  4. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

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    With the radical difference in ogive between the two, the COL isn't a factor, unless you are using a comparator to establish it.

    Anyway, I think you have your answer. Sounds like the throat isn't deep enough to keep the bullets on the Rems from jamming into the lands.
     
  5. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    I've also seen brand new brass with primer pockets out of spec - too big. I've seen more of that on reloads where there was a military crimp and someone reamed the pocket too big. A loose primer pocket will cause that as will an excessive powder charge.

    These other guys are right too - depends on what it was. I don't know if that ammo had crimped pockets originally so I'm flying blind here.

    One thing - you can tell when you insert new primers if the pockets are too loose. You get used to the amount of force it takes to insert a primer with any tool including a press. You just "know" if it's loose when you push it in. I'd "feel" for that on this brass compared to other brass.

    Good luck. :thumbup:
     
  6. coosbaycreep

    coosbaycreep 9 miles South of Roseburg Active Member

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    This is just regular commercial brass, no crimps.

    I think Jamie6.5 is right about it being jammed into the lands though. That's the last factory ammo I'm buying for .303 anyway, and the bullets I ordered are lighter and spire points, so hopefully I won't have that problem again.

    thanks
     
  7. taroman

    taroman Willamette Valley Active Member

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    Probably low pressure loads. I had the same on Rem 257 Roberts factory loads.
     
  8. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    Krehmkej hit the nail on the head.

    I have seen the same thing with remington (and even winchester loads) but never with PRVI/Wolf gold box. Seems both companies load the rounds rather anemic figuring someone is going to want to shoot them in an original 1888 Lee-medford.