Anyone else like used guns with honest wear?

CLT65

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I saw a bargain in the classifieds a while back that got me thinking. It was a pistol that had some road rash, finish issues. I remember thinking it didn't look bad at all, to me. I'd use it without a second thought. In fact, a lot of my guns were bought used, with plenty of honest finish wear, no longer pretty and pristine, but mechanically just fine. That's not to say that I don't have some that are very nice, that I take very good care of, but the ones with well-worn exteriors don't bother me a bit.

I bought a police trade-in CZ-75 a few years ago. When I got to the FFL for the transfer, he wanted me to look it over before the paperwork, as there were some very noticeable finish issues. He was relieved when I told him that I knew already and was fine with it. It shoots great and is a favorite. Sure, resale value won't be that great on it, but I didn't buy it to resell, and don't plan on reselling it at all. I could refinish it if I wanted to, but I kind of like it as it is.

I have an old Remington 721 30-06 that cost me less than $250, including the period correct Weaver scope. It's a tack driver, but shows honest wear from decades of hunting. I love it.

I like and appreciate fine guns with perfect finish, but there's a part of me that prefers the tried and true, well broke-in guns that a lot of people turn down their noses at.
 

Nosferatu

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My S&W 29 has plenty of finish wear from use.

I bought in the early 2005-ish from a retired CA Game & Fish Officer who carried it everyday for 20+ years. There is serious finish missing from the muzzle and cylinder from holster wear. The grips have some dings. The whole thing would be scoffed at by the purists, but I found it kinda endearing. It wasn't abused, it was a working gun.

Every now and then I get the wild idea of sending it off to be hard-chromed or reblued, but it would lose most it's charm at that point.
 

GWS

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I bought a police trade in Glock with lots of holster wear. It shoots great, which is what I bought it for. If I find another deal like that, I’ll buy that too.
 
Kinda like bowlegged women with flat heads.
Don't even need a coaster!
41dQMUab7JL._AC_SY1000_.jpg
 

gmerkt

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Very often guns that have a lot of wear from carry haven't actually been fired all that much. On the other hand, I've seen Smith & Wesson autos and revolvers that hadn't been carried much but had been used in competitive shooting and they were heavily worn inside from lots of shooting.

One of my favorite former guns was a Smith & Wesson pre-Model 16, that's the .22 LR w/ 4 in. bbl., is it called Target Masterpiece? Anyway, I got it years ago from an FFL dealer who was a retired city cop. He had an inside track on department guns that were being auctioned off. Many were seizures and forfeitures. That's where this Smith .22 came in, it had been confiscated from a crook. It had been dropped on the pavement once but was otherwise like new inside. It was very cheap.

There was a time when people didn't write down serial numbers of guns. Then when one went missing or got stolen, they didn't have a number to report. I figured that was what was going on with this gun. But that's only a guess. We could start another thread about this.
 

Alexx1401

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Since I have never been into "collecting", I have never cared if a gun had wear. When I buy a NIB its only new until I get my hands on it. I have never wanted to have one I had to be scared of getting a mark on. To me it's like people who buy a nice 4WD truck and then get some SUPER nice mural type paint job on. Then of course they can't ever do much with it out of fear of damage. I mean its their money so if it makes them happy great. Just not my thing.
 
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I have a 1956 Blackhawk that wears its years of carry and history. I also have a few guns that I have worn enough to get that character started on them. I have a little FN vest pocket, that was a war bring back, that is well worn as well. I would love to know the story on it but the relative that brought it back never told it.

There is nothing more appealing than a long barreled blued revolver. I can hold and admire them for hours. A well worn shooter will always be the first one out to play though.
 

K-22

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Very often guns that have a lot of wear from carry haven't actually been fired all that much. On the other hand, I've seen Smith & Wesson autos and revolvers that hadn't been carried much but had been used in competitive shooting and they were heavily worn inside from lots of shooting.

One of my favorite former guns was a Smith & Wesson pre-Model 16, that's the .22 LR w/ 4 in. bbl., is it called Target Masterpiece? Anyway, I got it years ago from an FFL dealer who was a retired city cop. He had an inside track on department guns that were being auctioned off. Many were seizures and forfeitures. That's where this Smith .22 came in, it had been confiscated from a crook. It had been dropped on the pavement once but was otherwise like new inside. It was very cheap.

There was a time when people didn't write down serial numbers of guns. Then when one went missing or got stolen, they didn't have a number to report. I figured that was what was going on with this gun. But that's only a guess. We could start another thread about this.
Mod 16? Methinks that is .32 caliber.
Best,
Gary
 
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I'd much rather have a shooter with wear on it than worrying about getting a scratch on a pristine safe queen.
Ditto this.

I have bought more used guns than new in my life. Partly because of deals I got on them and partly because of the above.

I have never given a used gun near the 'thought' I have with a new one - even if the used one was in very nice shape. I still regarded it as a 'shooter' and if it had a few 'beauty marks' on it, well, that was less I had to think about.

Probably my 'worst' case of a new gun becoming a 'shooter' was when I bought my Henry BBB .357 in 2014. It was literally flawless in the box - not a scratch, dent, pinprick anything. Well fast forward and the first thing I noticed after shooting it a bit was a dot of bright steel on the underside of the barrel near the muzzle!. Well after moaning about that, and several years of shooting it regularly it is still very nice but has its share of little scratches and marks (and one little dent in the stock)

So such is life. Either buy 'em to shoot or hang up and just look at them !
 

kmk1012

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As long as it’s priced accordingly. I was at the Albany gun show last weekend and really wanted this S&W 329PD that showed a LOT of holster wear but looked like it had been fired very little. Super tight lockup and end shake. The only issue was that the dealer wouldn’t budge an inch on the price, they were asking $1000 for it plus bgc, he wouldn’t even waive that. Oh well, I settled for a very nice S&W 460Magnum. I’m the kind of person who will buy something completely not needed if I feel like I got some kind of deal on it.
 
I have bought used and new guns...some of the used guns have been of the "Collector type" as in excellent to pristine examples of a particular model.

With that said...
I prefer a used gun that looks...used.
Not abused mind you...but I do not mind a firearm that looks like it has been well loved or used for its intended purpose.
I enjoy history...and a firearm that shows its history is what I like.
Andy
 
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Let me tell you about the time I dropped my brand new gen 3 Glock in the trash, where it landed on a sharp can rim and scratched up the finish before it ever saw live ammo. Didn't bother me, it's a personality mark I gave it. Typically I buy new because it's convenient, not because it's pretty and I don't have to deal with flakes or pay that extra transfer fee. A well worn gun isn't necessarily a bad thing
 
Here is one used gun that has honest wear...
Lots of dings and finish loss with a lovely patina.
It also accounted for my last elk.
.58 Flintlock J.Henry Trade Rifle....circa 1800 - 1820's.

One shot and a dead elk....no different than if I shot it with a rifle or cartridge made yesterday.
Andy
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