.223 Trimming

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by ThunderStruck, Jun 23, 2013.

  1. ThunderStruck

    ThunderStruck
    Southern Oregon
    Member

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    My wife picked up a few hundred pices of .223 brass yesterday at a yard sale for $2.00.

    When I went to clean and size them, I found that most are trimmed to 1.945 and not 1.950 minimum as called for.

    I need to know if .005 under minimum are ok to use ...

    Thanks,
    Ed
     
  2. Twodogs

    Twodogs
    portland Or
    Active Member

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    You will be ok.
     
  3. bellarum

    bellarum
    beaverton
    Well-Known Member

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    Unless you know for sure that it was once fired (easy to tell with crimped brass) check for case head separation, loose primer pockets, and cracked necks with every loading. Just because the brass is short does not mean that it isn't at the end of it's life. Most of my FC brass never reaches trim length even after being loaded 6 times.
     
  4. ThunderStruck

    ThunderStruck
    Southern Oregon
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    Thanks guys
     
  5. deadshot2

    deadshot2
    NW Quadrant WA State
    Well-Known Member

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    Trimming short is not that big a deal. In fact, if you use one company's sizing die they want you to trim the case below the suggested mimimum the first time so you'll supposedly never have to trim again. If you have a case short enough to fit into the chamber and long enough to hold the bullet, just remember what the case's purpose is. To hold the bullet and powder whole transporting and loading, then form a gasket to keep burning gasses in the bore. Nothing else.
     
  6. AMProducts

    AMProducts
    Maple Valley, WA
    Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    Factory brass is frequently under the minimum, it may grow during the sizing process (usually you don't have to trim until after sizing anyways). After you've spent enough time reloading, you'll realize "spec" and reality can have some huge variation. I worry less about short cases than I do with long ones. The big problem with short .223 brass (and I'm talking much shorter than .005) is neck tension issues and bullets not being retained properly.
     

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