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Why do 10/22 stocks cost more than the damn gun?

Discussion in 'Gear & Accessories' started by Ironbar, Jan 21, 2012.

  1. Ironbar

    Ironbar Tigard, OR Well-Known Member

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    Seriously, I wanna know!:confused:
     
  2. 142

    142 Rogue Valley Member

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    Because people will buy 'em...

    I got a very nice gillie tan Hogue .920 stock for my 10/22 for $65. It works perfect for me, its very light and it will hold up to weather. You don't have to spend mega bucks on a 10/22 stock unless you want one in that range. The target oriented stocks are free floated (not contacting the barrel) and that helps with accuracy. That being said my $65 Hogue stock doesn't contact the barrel at all either. It mostly has to do with what you are willing to spend on a stock for a .22 and what you want it to look like.
     
  3. Key-Hay

    Key-Hay North Carolina Active Member

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  4. chase

    chase Wilsonville, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Economics: Supply and demand. Who wants just a plain 10/22, When you can have a $1000 tacticool 10/22?
     
  5. Nwcid

    Nwcid Yakima and N of Spokane Well-Known Member

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    They dont. You can buy a standard 10/22 stock for $35.

    If you want something cooler and takes more time/material/different material it cost more.

    If you think they need to be cheeper then figure out the cost of equipment, man hours, supplies, overhead, ect then build some for less and sell them
     
  6. FireArm

    FireArm Beavercreek 97004 Well-Known Member 2015 Volunteer

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    Because America is a capitalist society and its all about making a buck, And a sucker is born every second.
     
  7. plumberfishes

    plumberfishes Gresham oregon Active Member

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    i think my stock was 39 bucks and it is cool as hell, i had to use a dremel to fit it to my .920 carbon fiber wrapped barrel.. but now i have a 1" 100 yard 10/22 for I think a total invest ment of under $300... and under 3 pounds! the kids love this one!
     
  8. Kevatc

    Kevatc Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Not arguing the free float concept but for a 10/22??????
     
  9. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Does make one wonder why someone would invest a grand in a 10/22 then carp about spending the same on a on a good bolt action rifle.
     
  10. Rix

    Rix Tacoma Active Member

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    Mine came with a stock.
     
    Northwest21 and (deleted member) like this.
  11. mkwerx

    mkwerx Forest Grove, OR Well-Known Member

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    Fondled the lightest 10/22 I've ever seen a while back at Sportsman's warehouse. It had a synthetic stock, IIRC, and a fluted, aluminum barrel with a steel sleeve. Thing was seriously light as a feather. The barrel for that gun was more than the stock 10/22's on the shelf. The syn stock was probably as much as the gun.
     
  12. Grommit327

    Grommit327 Buckley Active Member

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    I look at it the other way...the good stocks are probably better quality than the 10/22's being produced these days with their cheap receivers and plastic trigger groups. A good, light, thumbhole free floating stock paired with a nice light tensioned barrel and some trigger work goes a long way to accurizing the 10/22 and making it a pleasure to handle. I have $200 into the gun, $100 into the stock and $130 into the barrel. Another $40 into working the trigger over(can be done cheaper).
     
  13. Aero Denezol

    Aero Denezol Salem Active Member

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    The market will obviously bear it.. but I'm similarly mystified.. The 10/22 has this lego-gun thing going on, similar to the AR platform. Building them up must be half the fun.

    Savage and Marlin both make 22's w/ a lot of nice features out of the box, no customization needed.
     
  14. 142

    142 Rogue Valley Member

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    Doesn't hurt - I didn't compare accuracy between free floating and not but the difference in accuracy between the factory base model 10/22 barrel and my new Tactical Solutions .920 barrel (16.5" 15.5oz) is tremendous. I'll post a photo of the group size difference later.
     
  15. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    When all is said and done, when all the mods are added to a 10/22 all one has is an expensive .22 cal rifle. I think I'd rather have one of the old bolt action Mossberg's that were used for basic military rifle training "back in the day".
     
  16. Aero Denezol

    Aero Denezol Salem Active Member

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    I'm with you, I never modify my 22's, but I'm not much of a bench rest shooter either. I derive a lot of joy from identifying and correcting for the quirks of each individual gun as I shoot.

    BiMart can get good prices on aftermarket stuff for the 10/22. It's all in-store catalog orders, but it is much less expensive.
     
  17. jrprich

    jrprich PNW Well-Known Member

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    I don't know if the aftermarket ones cost so much. My ATI Ruger 10/22 Strikeforce Six Position Side Folding Gun Stock only cost me $23 after subtracting what I sold my OEM 10/22 black plastic stock for on ebay.
     
  18. chetterbob

    chetterbob parents live in christmas valley New Member

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    it all depends on what your going to do with it i have 900.00 in mine but it shoots 1 hole 10 shot groups at 50yrds and 1/4in groups at 100yrds with good ammo i shoot sage rats all day long at 250 and 300yrds on a calm day so to me its worth the money
     
  19. strick

    strick McMinnville Oregon Member

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    i would say quality matters, but more then that, where it was made. The whole "made in china" does keep the cost down by a large margin I am sure, Also with the question of why, well simple, not everyone needs or can afford to shot a bigger rifle all the time, so why spend all that $$$ on something you that makes you feel like you just got "raped" after one box?? I plan on getting a 10/11 and replacing the factory stock as well, mostly due to my needing a long length of pull. Would I spend $300 for a stock, depends on what it offers and if it was 100% american made or not compared to others.