Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

seen this before?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by misplacedtexan, Jun 14, 2013.

  1. misplacedtexan

    misplacedtexan Beaverton, OR Active Member

    Messages:
    373
    Likes Received:
    124
    WP_20130614_005.jpg

    both are 357 sig speer brass...

    Was going through some brass I bought and found that guy, no idea about it's history/back story.

    WP_20130614_005.jpg
     
  2. elsie

    elsie Way over there on the left Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    888
    Likes Received:
    621
    Looks like the one on the right didn't finish going through all the manufacturing steps. Are they the same headstamps? And what about the rest?


    elsie
     
  3. misplacedtexan

    misplacedtexan Beaverton, OR Active Member

    Messages:
    373
    Likes Received:
    124
    I was thinking it just never got finished. Same head stamps and what not. Someone has fired it at some point.
     
  4. Sodbuster

    Sodbuster Beaverton, OR Chief Cook/Bottle Washer

    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    126
    Interesting. Really, really good argument for checking your brass closely.
     
  5. elsie

    elsie Way over there on the left Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    888
    Likes Received:
    621
    Hmm. Makes me wonder about the history of the brass. If they were both fired in the same firearm, they should both have the same shoulder profile and it doesn't appear that that is so. If it were me, I'd probably send that pic off to the manufacturer. No expectation that they would do anything about the brass, but they might look into their QA process.


    elsie
     
  6. Benihaus

    Benihaus Portland American

    Messages:
    349
    Likes Received:
    111
    I dont know what the profile of that case is supposed to look like, but to me it appears that perhaps the one on the left got squished in the crimp stage and didnt fire form all the way out.
    edit:
    looked closer and I have to agree with previous posts, or perhaps it was a .40 that has been converted.
     
  7. misplacedtexan

    misplacedtexan Beaverton, OR Active Member

    Messages:
    373
    Likes Received:
    124
    It's stamped .357 Sig. Thats the shape they're supposed to be....minus the rim area. Won't even fit in a shellholder is how I caught it. I usually go through all my brass AFTER I resize/decap since thats where I get the most splits and what not anyways.
     
  8. bballer182

    bballer182 Molalla Active Member

    Messages:
    392
    Likes Received:
    53
    Wow. I'm surprised that it was even extracted out of the firearm. Or maybe it wasn't and that's why it was left on the ground at the range...
     
  9. logicgear

    logicgear Enumclaw WA New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    The .357 SIG pistol cartridge is the product of Swiss-German firearms manufacturer SIG Sauer, in cooperation with the American ammunition manufacturer Federal Cartridge. While it is based on a .40 S&W case necked down to accept 0.355-inch (9.0 mm) bullets, the .357 SIG brass is slightly longer (0.009-inch (0.23 mm) to 0.020-inch (0.51 mm)). The cartridge is used by a number of law enforcement agencies and has a good reputation for both accuracy and stopping power.

    .357 SIG - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  10. misplacedtexan

    misplacedtexan Beaverton, OR Active Member

    Messages:
    373
    Likes Received:
    124
    You missed the intent of the original post logicgear. Check the rims on the brass. One is clearly out of spec.
     
  11. logicgear

    logicgear Enumclaw WA New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ah.. sorry about that. My browser wouldn't let me expand the picture before. I see it now. that is strange.

    I would say two difference manufactures but you said they are both stamped Speer. Do the necks measure out the same? The one on the right looks like the neck is slightly different.
     
  12. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    2,804
    Likes Received:
    1,859
    Someone's turn and trim machine (blackrock/saginaw) wasn't adjusted properly, and they never caught the problem.

    Out of curiosity was this winchester factory new brass, because that's typical of the defects I see in that.
     
  13. misplacedtexan

    misplacedtexan Beaverton, OR Active Member

    Messages:
    373
    Likes Received:
    124
    Nope, Speer.

    I think I had already resized the one on the right, can't really remember now. My die bumps my shoulder back a hair further than normal as I used to have chambering issues in one of my handguns.