Reloading for the 6.5 PRC

capdek

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Just purchased a new bolt gun in 6.5 PRC. The long distance bug finally did me in. :)
The rifle will be shipped out sometime next week so I haven't tried it as yet.
I also purchased two cases of the Hornady 147 grain ELD-M ammo to start out with, but the plan is to eventually reload for this new rifle.
Anyway, I'm wondering if anyone is shooting this new cartridge and perhaps reloading for it.
 
OP
capdek

capdek

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What's the expected barrel life on that caliber?

What made you choose it over a 6.5 creedmoor?
I think I read G.A. Precision is estimating roughly 1800 to 2200 rounds although I'm sure it will vary somewhat depending on care and whether it's being used for competition or hunting. It should certainly be better than the 26 Nosler. :eek:
As for the choice, I was originally thinking the 6.5 CM, but Tim at Copeland Custom Gunworks recommended something in a magnum for longer range shooting saying the 6.5 CM was pretty similar to what I already had - my 7mm-08. After doing some research, I decided I liked the idea of a non-rebated rim, non-belted short magnum cartridge and the great ballistics of the .264" diameter bullet. Hornady touts it as the magnum version of the CM and is clearly behind it. Given the success of the CM, the hope is the PRC will become a very popular cartridge as well. We'll see though.
 
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I hope it is okay to ask the question here.

As I am prepping to get into reloading, I find myself confused, why is a 6.5 Creedmoor/ PRC/ Swede called "6.5" and not its actual diameter 6.71mm/ 0.264 in.? I could have bought the wrong bullets. The 25-06 is a 6.5mm/ 0.257 in. diameter bullet but it is called a "25"-06. Even the 8mm mauser is called 7.92x57 in some circles, but its actual bullet diameter is 8.22mm/ 0.324 in., why? A lot of cartridges are called by what they are in relation to their bullet diameter.

Can anyone help me understand? Thanks.
 
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I hope it is okay to ask the question here.

As I am prepping to get into reloading, I find myself confused, why is a 6.5 Creedmoor/ PRC/ Swede called "6.5" and not its actual diameter 6.71mm/ 0.264 in.? I could have bought the wrong bullets. The 25-06 is a 6.5mm/ 0.257 in. diameter bullet but it is called a "25"-06. Even the 8mm mauser is called 7.92x57 in some circles, but its actual bullet diameter is 8.22mm/ 0.324 in., why? A lot of cartridges are called by what they are in relation to their bullet diameter.

Can anyone help me understand? Thanks.
Maybe not a complete answer to your question, but the British and perhaps other countries measure the diameter the distance between the lands and not the rifling, thus the .303 actually shooting a .311" bullet.
 

ageingstudent

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I hope it is okay to ask the question here.

As I am prepping to get into reloading, I find myself confused, why is a 6.5 Creedmoor/ PRC/ Swede called "6.5" and not its actual diameter 6.71mm/ 0.264 in.? I could have bought the wrong bullets. The 25-06 is a 6.5mm/ 0.257 in. diameter bullet but it is called a "25"-06. Even the 8mm mauser is called 7.92x57 in some circles, but its actual bullet diameter is 8.22mm/ 0.324 in., why? A lot of cartridges are called by what they are in relation to their bullet diameter.

Can anyone help me understand? Thanks.
There are tons of cartridges that are named "x" but their actual dimension is "y". Some have to do with history, some have to do with nomenclature of the time being overtaken by modern measurement standards, black powder vs smokeless, metric vs English...there are a hundred different reasons each one specific to each unique modern cartridge.

Example: present day .38 special is a .357 groove diameter. Old days .38 special (just before 1900 I think) was originally a black powder cartridge with a 'heeled' bullet much like a present day smokeless .22lr. The bullet used to be the same diameter as the case just like a .22, thus the .38 designation. When they (Smith & Wesson) changed the design of the bullet and the revolver they didn't change the caliber number to .357. Probably for thrift and advertising reasons. Seems like the .357 magnum should be called the .38 magnum if they had stuck with it but they didn't so...? I have read that the old .36 Navy black powder cap and ball is the true parent of the .38 special but... @AndyinEverson is a major black powder guy...care to weigh in Andy?

I think I got the above example right but if I missed something ANYBODY feel free to correct me.

Bottom line is it pays to do your homework Before you buy your projectiles. There's been attempts to standardize all this over the last century, but it's still not even close to standardized. Figuring out the history of why things are as they are now is kinda interesting if you're sick like me though:p.
 

Andy54Hawken

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I have read that the old .36 Navy black powder cap and ball is the true parent of the .38 special but... @AndyinEverson is a major black powder guy...care to weigh in Andy?
The .36 Navy takes a .375 round ball....Colt at the time measured the lands not the grooves...
The .44 Walker , Dragoon and 1860 Army take a .454 round ball...

A hot load for the .36 Navy can be close to a low end .38 Special load...
Its the soft lead ball or bullet that expands nicely at the low velocity that does the trick with these cap and ball revolvers.
Andy
 

flashpan

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capdek
Congrats on the new rifle and a new cartidge that I believe makes good sense in the LR game. I don't own one yet but the 6.5 and 300 are on my radar. I owned a CM for a time...liked it but IMHO its nothing special in the field but does now dominate many long range matches for those shooting 6.5mm bullets. Some serious design work involved in these new PRC cartridges...chamber dimensions are well thought out for accuracy and heavy bullets ... great for reloading. Too bad you could only buy two cases of ammo.:) I found the 147 ELD -M very accurate out of a factory barrel. Enjoy!
 

ageingstudent

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The .36 Navy takes a .375 round ball....Colt at the time measured the lands not the grooves...
The .44 Walker , Dragoon and 1860 Army take a .454 round ball...

A hot load for the .36 Navy can be close to a low end .38 Special load...
Its the soft lead ball or bullet that expands nicely at the low velocity that does the trick with these cap and ball revolvers.
Andy
Yes so the old .36 Navy was really close to a genuine .38. Tons of examples like this. 30-06 cal is same as .308 Winchester and .300 Savage. Just a different case and nomenclature.
 

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