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metal filler to fill f scratches and gouges

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by kentsboots, Mar 21, 2011.

  1. kentsboots

    kentsboots Oregon Member

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    Before i refinish my AK build, i need to fill a few small scratches and gouge marks from assembly. I have used Bondo on wood with no problems before, but would it hold as good on something that may get hot ? is there a better product i should use ?
     
  2. kentsboots

    kentsboots Oregon Member

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    Id also like to get rid of that "G" as well

    IMAG0216.jpg

    IMAG0215.jpg

    IMAG0214.jpg
     
  3. RockKrawler

    RockKrawler Gresham Member

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    Look for a product called All-Metal,it is a powdered metal in a resin that is workable but dries very hard.
    One other that may work is Marine Tex avail from boat shops.
    RK
     
  4. joken

    joken Corvallis Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Don't know what finish you plan to use. I use acraglas epoxy to fill holes etc before applying Duracoat. Ken
     
  5. Tech

    Tech Renton Wa New Member

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    JB Weld two part metal filled epoxy
    $5.00 at any auto parts store
    Clean the spot well with solvent
    Sand / roughen the area, remove all paint
    Apply enough to fill the hole
    Clean off the excess with water
    let cure for 24 hrs
    Sand smooth
     
  6. Silver Fox

    Silver Fox Puyallup, WA Well-Known Member

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  7. kentsboots

    kentsboots Oregon Member

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    thanks all, i will be using cerakote on this one.
     
  8. Pauly

    Pauly N. Portland Active Member

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    How about just blending the spots with drill-mount course abrasive prep pads, then wire brushing with a wire wheel, then media blasting it to bring it back to the correct looking finish?
     
  9. Tech

    Tech Renton Wa New Member

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    Don't knock JB weld!!
    J-B Weld Company - J-B WELD Product Information
    They say it is resistant to 500F and I have ran it well past that.
    I have also repaired flaws in Aluminum that was then power coated with great results.

    I have never used the the hightemp filler product. It sounds great for truly high temp applications where bonding isn't important however the 450F for 1 hr cure cycle seems a bit unrealistic for the home user without an industrial oven.

    "In order for Hi-Temp Lab-metal to completly harden after a 24 hour air dry time, it must be exposed to a minimum temperature of 425ºF for a period of at least one hour"

    They say that it is non conductive but also good for powder coating?? powder coating is an electrostatic process that needs conductivity. JB Weld is also non conductive and doesn't powdercoat perfectly much past 1/4" in thickness. Does the HighTemp product have similar issues?
    Just curious
     
  10. Pauly

    Pauly N. Portland Active Member

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    Bondo?
    JB Weld?

    I really am glad others keep doing those type of jobs.
    That's job security for Pauly. :thumbup:

    6-1.jpg

    I come across that stuff far too often when blasting carriers.

    What if a future owner decides he wants to blue the weapon?

    Just build up at low amperage then dress it down if stuff's too deep to fix by surface prepping.
    If a gunsmith can't do that..... :paranoid:

    I can see private citizens doing that, but when people who pass their work off as professional do beware.
    They'll get away with it for a while, but when a client goes to get something done & that stuff gets discovered, it don't look too good.

    The above is a monstrosity I came across on a $2,400.00 gun & had to inform my client because I was shipping it out in a high polished finish.
    Needless to say, the clien't was no longer impressed with who he thought was a great gunsmith.
    I got one heck of a great review for fixing it, but spent hours on damage control for the original craftsman so the client wouldn't go on a crusade against the other guy.
     
  11. PlayboyPenguin

    PlayboyPenguin Pacific Northwest Well-Known Member 2016 Volunteer

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    I do not see anything that needs filling. It looks to me like buffing would take care of the problem and be a lot easier and more permanent.
     
  12. Swedish K

    Swedish K SW Washington Moderator Staff Member

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    when in doubt Tig to the rescue - if those are impact marks / stampings a light pass with a Tig welder - no fill material - will most often resurface it and as you aren't adding any metal that isn't a different alloy it will still blue or parkerize without discolorations showing in the finish. Kinda like using an eraser :)
     
  13. Tech

    Tech Renton Wa New Member

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    A little tig work
    That's the best idea I have heard all day.
    I can think of a lot of places that would smooth out an offending gouge or surface flaw