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My daughter is also in Japan, but was not directly affected by the earthquake. However, she was travelling to another city to meet a friend and the connecting train was cancelled due to the earthquake. She had to stay overnight in the city where the first train stopped, and was taken in by a kind couple who also took her to the train station the following morning.

She experienced aftershocks as late as today, but only mild shaking. She is in the mountains west of Tokyo, far from the oceans.
 
The Pacific Plate boundary aka the "Ring of Fire" has rocked Japan more than some would expect, but the west coast is also considered to be an active seismic zone as well. WA is waiting for the mega thrust earthquake aka "The big one" to hit.

My mom was in the Alaskan earthquake in 1964 and the shaking lasted for nearly 5 minutes. I was in grade school with my class near Olympia, out in an open field when the Nisqually earthquake hit in 2001. It was weird to see and feel the ground shake outside.
 
This is what some (many?) of our roads will look like after a severe Cascadian earthquake:
a0436a53c3963ad5740ed91fb748544c.jpg

Got into a little back and forth (IIRC on Reddit) about how fast roads/bridges would be repaired to be passable in the PNW after such an earthquake. I said months, if not years - Redditor said weeks. I don't think that person had a clue how much damage would be caused or how long it would take to make roads like this passable. The Redditor argued that DOTs would just create temporary bypass roads - maybe possible where there is room, not on many roads where there just isn't room or geological support for a bypass road.
 
This is what some (many?) of our roads will look like after a severe Cascadian earthquake:
View attachment 1794287

Got into a little back and forth (IIRC on Reddit) about how fast roads/bridges would be repaired to be passable in the PNW after such an earthquake. I said months, if not years - Redditor said weeks. I don't think that person had a clue how much damage would be caused or how long it would take to make roads like this passable. The Redditor argued that DOTs would just create temporary bypass roads - maybe possible where there is room, not on many roads where there just isn't room or geological support for a bypass road.
For many years Seattle had alternate on and off ramps ready, mind you they didn't really connect to anything. :rolleyes:
 
This is what some (many?) of our roads will look like after a severe Cascadian earthquake:
View attachment 1794287

Got into a little back and forth (IIRC on Reddit) about how fast roads/bridges would be repaired to be passable in the PNW after such an earthquake. I said months, if not years - Redditor said weeks. I don't think that person had a clue how much damage would be caused or how long it would take to make roads like this passable. The Redditor argued that DOTs would just create temporary bypass roads - maybe possible where there is room, not on many roads where there just isn't room or geological support for a bypass road.
Holy hell I should probably have a skidder handy as a backup rig in that case. And Idk if Mr Redditor has ever had to depend on DOT projects to make their life work but looking at DOT projects around the state I can't imagine a world in which they shift from tortoise to hare speed, especially with the almost certain extreme chaos that would follow such a disaster in an even moderately populated area.
 
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