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Help! need answers from someone with a Thumlers rotary tumbler model B and steel pins

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Mark W., Apr 9, 2012.

  1. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I'm in the process of building my own rotary tumbler to be used with steel pin media. And I have a couple questions.

    What is the lenght of each side of the sides inside on a Thumler's Tumbler Model B High Speed tumbler?

    What is the width of each side of the sides inside on a Thumler's Tumbler Model B High Speed tumbler?

    How many lbs of media do you use?

    How full does this make your drum?

    I'm building this tumbler to fit under my reloading bench so I have a slightly restricted space to work with. I need to know the inside size of the drum to get an idea how that would compare to what I can build and if I need to go longer to equal this units 15lbs rating.

    My machine will be much heavier built mostly due to the materials and parts I already have on hand.

    I've designed and built a few other machines so I have a good idea what I am doing. But having never seen one of these machines and the web sites offering no dimensions I could use a little help.

    Much thanks.

    a couple of my knifemaking machines I designed and built Portfolio Slideshow - photo.net
     
  2. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Don't have the Thumblers Model B HS but can answer one question.

    5# of media is the recommended "load. All is based on weight for this tumbler. It has a 15# capacity. Take a gallon of water at just over 8#, 5# of pins, that leaves only 2# of remaining capacity for brass.

    I am using an RCBS Sidewinder I've had for years but the loading is similar.
     
  3. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Thanks Deadshot. After watching a number of You tubes on this method and tumbler I came up with the same idea. The machine I will be building will be much more industrial then the Thumler machine. Starting with a full 1/3HP Marathon TEFC 1725rpm motor that was originally driving a 2 x 72" Belt grinder. I'm thinking about building a drum suited to about 2-2.5 gallons of water + 5lbs media and 5 lbs of brass.
     
  4. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Just remember that the drum inside should not be round. Note how the drum on the Thumbler's are more of a geometric shape like Pentagon, Hexagon, etc (I never counted).

    If you're starting with a round drum you could probably just use "paddles" like in a cement mixer and attach rubber plate to them to prevent damage to the cases.

    If you don't break up the flat surface of the cylinder's interior the cases and pins will just tend to slide as a mass and the tumbling action won't take place.
     
  5. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    yea I am currently looking at two possibilities

    1. a Hexagon drum made from Micarta using a sheet rubber seal.

    2. a Gamma lid bucket using and internal PVC pipe structure to act as a paddle. (since the plastic buckets are made from does not glue well and I don't want to use a mechanical anchor for the paddles.

    I have time to over engineer it in my head before I build it so I may come up with a completely different idea before I start making the thing.
     
  6. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Make your "hexagon" from something like FRP (Fiber Reinforced Plastic) panel material by inserting properly sized pieces into the cylinder. Then pour casting resin in the voids between the sides of the hexagon and the cylinder. This will seal the area from the solution and it could also help deaden the sounds from the tumbling cases. Tape of the joints between the panels and he bottom of the cylinder to keep the resin in the void until it sets. Some of the Urethane materials can be fairly soft, not unlike silicone rubber and would be perfect for noise damping.