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Fluting. Why?

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by GrpCapMandrake, Aug 22, 2010.

  1. GrpCapMandrake

    GrpCapMandrake Vancouver Active Member

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    I see it everywhere but I am not convinced of its effectiveness on barrels and more particularly on the bolts of rifles. Why would you flute a bolt?
     
  2. Greg_M

    Greg_M Poulsbo, WA New Member

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    Some possible answers

    It slightly lightens it
    It gives slightly more surface area for cooling
    It looks cool?
     
  3. PDXGS

    PDXGS Aloha... yes, Aloha, Oregon Member

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    As I understand it, the primary purpose of the bolt flutes is to allow debris/dirt to be channeled into the flutes where it will not affect bolt operation.
     
  4. SDR

    SDR Clackamas County, Oregon Silver Vendor Silver Vendor

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  5. GrpCapMandrake

    GrpCapMandrake Vancouver Active Member

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    Well now there are all sorts of different styles. Is one better than another or do they have different purposes? As far as a barrel is concerned.

    Mandrake
     
  6. SDR

    SDR Clackamas County, Oregon Silver Vendor Silver Vendor

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    If you are looking for facts as opposed to idea's or theories or what someone heard from someone else that had it done...LOL...
    The Man to talk with is strictlyRUM, Jason... Jason built this rifle... Not only is he a gunsmith, But he is a metallurgist also...

    Home
     
  7. phathom

    phathom Vancouver, WA Member

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    I saw on futureweapons they had fluted the bolt on a bolt action rifle that was used in extreme cold and snow, in order to allow it to break the snow up to avoid freezing shut and still function in rough conditions.
     
  8. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

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    During WWII, the Russians fluted the chambers of their SVT-40s for extraction and fouling purposes.

    Keith
     
  9. bcp

    bcp SW WA Member

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    A fluted barrel is lighter than a non-fluted of the same size, and stiffer than a non-fluted of the same weight.

    Bruce
     
  10. coop44

    coop44 Tacoma ,WA Well-Known Member

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    I stand on one foot and hop in a counter clockwise circle chanting "boom shuka luka luka boom" I swear it works for me, my groups are better, try it!!!

    A little chicken blood on the bolt also helps
     
  11. SDR

    SDR Clackamas County, Oregon Silver Vendor Silver Vendor

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    You sound like a incredibly intelligent human being also....:laugh::bluelaugh::laugh:...

    Do you dress up like Santa or are you a Ferry....:thumbup:
     
  12. SDR

    SDR Clackamas County, Oregon Silver Vendor Silver Vendor

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    HA,HA, HA.... LOL...:bluelaugh::laugh::bluelaugh:....:thumbup:
    The front of that boat could come in handy though...
     
  13. Scorch

    Scorch New Member

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    In reply to the original question, flutes serve several purposes. On a bolt, they allow you to have very close action/bolt clearance and still be able to move the bolt easily because of reduced contact surface area and the flutes channeling debris and dirt. If done well, they are quite atttractive, also.

    On a barrel, the flutes serve to lighten the barrel and slightly increase the surface area for cooling. It does seem to increase surface area a bit for cooling, and it definitely reduces weight. There are some claims about accuracy improvements, but they vary so widely that it is difficult to believe what is real and what is puffery. Some very good tests have been done that show no gain in accuracy, others that show a slight gain in accuracy, and still others that show loss of accuracy, so I believe it depends on the barrel, the cutting tool used to flute the barrel, the machinist, etc, and it is not consistent.

    But due to the cost of fluting, the inconsistent accuracy effects, and the loss of barrel rigidity, I personally think the main positive effect of barrel fluting is to keep gunsmiths employed.