Field/Backcountry First Aid Training

Discussion in 'Education & Training' started by benbradley, Mar 3, 2017.

  1. benbradley

    benbradley
    Vancouver, WA
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    I'm planning on spending a lot of time hiking and backpacking this summer and it's been a while (~9 yrs) since I've had any kind of training in field first aid. Are there any classes, EMTs, 68Ws, or nurses that could give a course of instruction to refresh me?
     
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  2. that guy

    that guy
    PDX
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    I recommend finding a certified class. I took a NOLS Wildernes First Aid class and really enjoyed it. That's where I recommend anyone start. Since then I got into it and I'm currently an EMT student with the goal of getting my Wilderness EMT license.
     
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  3. benbradley

    benbradley
    Vancouver, WA
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    Good tip, thanks!
     
  4. ThePhonMan

    ThePhonMan
    Spokanistan
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    Field Trauma and Aid Course

    Not sure if they are still doing this but this thread from a year or so back seems right up your alley.
     
  5. AndyinEverson

    AndyinEverson
    Everson, Wa.
    Moderator with a Black powder affinity... Staff Member Silver Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    A handy book on first aid is First Aid for Soldiers.
    Sure some things are changed or updated like CPR ... But old methods are better than doing nothing.
    And some ideas in the book might not be found in other books .
    Andy
     
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  6. that guy

    that guy
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    One thing I want to mention too is that many of these books and courses focus almost entirely on trauma and leave out medical emergencies. Don't get me wrong, trauma is more fun than medical (for the responder, probably suck equally for the patient) but I feel like I'm much more likely to find someone on the trail in respiratory distress than having had their leg blown off or something. Plus medical emergencies are far more likely in other settings: at the grocery store, at your job, whatever.

    Basically what I'm saying is don't neglect the medical portion of the training.
     
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