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Eastern Oregon Elk Rifle

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by Bentwing, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. Bentwing

    Bentwing Milwaukie Or New Member

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    I could use some help in selecting an elk rifle for 2nd season Around Granite. I have not hunted Elk in Eastern Oregon before. My hunting buddey seems to think I need at least a 7mm Mag. But I do hane a 270 with a 2-7 scope. I also have a Marlin 1895 45-70 Which I can put a Cabellas lever action scope that with horniday bullets is supposed to be good to 300 yards, according to the ads.
    I am also am looking at a338-06 remington re-barrel. any comments or advice are sincerely aprichiated.

    Bentwing
     
  2. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    If you don't load your own ammo, buy some Federal loaded with the Nosler Partition for your .270 and go hunting. You've got all of the gun you need. I understand that you may want to buy a new gun, but since you already own a .270, there really isn't a need to. Some may tell you that you don't have enough scope.... don't listen to them either. :thumbup:
     
  3. WhyteCheddar

    WhyteCheddar East of Moscow by the Willamette Well-Known Member

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    .270 certainly is an acceptable caliber for elk as long as you have the right load.
    As far as the scope goes you can get away with the 2x7. What is the objective lens size? Is it a 1 inch tube? As long as you are seeing well when the light is low the power should be fine. If you are second season then you are are probably going to run into some cold/wet weather. The scope should be water proof, and fog proof.
     
  4. BigBull 301

    BigBull 301 PDX almost Well-Known Member

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    Use the 270 you have. One of my buddies has taken over 10 elk with his.
    Practice, practice, practice.
    Good Luck!
     
  5. 284guy

    284guy Woodburn Member

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    Ive hunted a lot of big elk, and personally I think a 270 is light in all but the most experiencd hands. Can it be done, of course, but if your placement is off you sure dont want to chase an animal into the bottom of some hole. You and the animal deserve more. Personally, I think a 300 mag is optimal, but a 30/06 or 7 mag will kill one just as dead. Ill grant you that confidence in your rifle and placement with a quality bullet is everything, but why not buy a new rifle? Perfect excuse! I love the federal premium 200gr sierra boattail in the 300winmag, Ive never had an elk take one step when hit with that load. just my .02
     
  6. deadeye

    deadeye Albany,OR. Moderator Staff Member

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    personally it depends on the country you are in as to how far of a shot you will get. The 270 is fine for 100 yrds if placed right but a 300 and above would be best for longer range for knock down power. I myself use a 338 with two different loads for different territory. The 45/70 with the hornady is great for deer as I use a guide model with 300gr HP which I load. I use it for elk in brushy short range with 400 gr soft points @ 1800fps using H335.

    My ultimate elk hunt would include a lawn chair with a cooler on top of a hill in eastern Oregon with a good spotting scope, a 6X24X50 scope and a Barrett 50 oh so nicely mounted on a tripod. This would be a good hunt but I'm lazy and don't like hiking in rocks.:D
     
  7. johnboy

    johnboy Hillsboro Member

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    .270 has been used for years in Montana etc and with todays bullets (premium) it will work fine with proper shot placement and within its effective range. Stay away from long(300yds+) shots unless you practice practice practice with the load you will use and dont think about long shots in the wind on game animals. A wounded animal is not what you want in your list of hunting stories.....it happens, but it can be minimized easily. The key on elk is you need a tough bullet to expand and PENETRATE so a premium bullet is far superior if you hit a shoulder or quartering shot. If you like having a variety of rifles, a larger caliber would probably be better on larger animals depending on what you can handle recoil wise.
     
  8. terrylf72

    terrylf72 Portland, Oregon, United States Member

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    I agree with Orygun, WhyteCheddar and BigBull . your 270 will be just fine. Myself I use a Reminton 700 BDL in 308. 26" barrel. I have 5 kills with this weapon.. :rockon:
     
  9. McLovin

    McLovin portland Member

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    I have hunted deer and elk in eastern oregon for 25 years. The oonly gun I have used is a 270. I use 130gr. for deer and sight in at 100 yrds. and use 180gr. and sight in at 200yrds.for elk. he only thing is I dont take a shot unless I know itis a kill shot. Took me several years of tracking to figure that out but anymore it is just not worth itto me.
    A 30-06 is about the same as a 270 so if you do get a diffrent gun dont go with that. I feel a 270 is a flatter shooting gun than a 30-06 but somewill argue on that.
    I think the gun you have is just fine but get good ammo unless you rerload and a better scope would be good but you could get by with what you have.
    The most important thing is just get out there andhave fun and enjoy and pick a good shot.
     
  10. johnboy

    johnboy Hillsboro Member

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    McLovin you are right about the .270 being flatter which is important after 250 yds.....right again about picking your shot which often times you cannot easily do on elk. Broadside throught the lungs= dead elk.
     
  11. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    I think I'd be tempted to use the scoped 45/70 honestly. I like the knock-down power. I've had to track elk in both Desolation and Murderer's Creek units, and its a pain. Lots of blow down and thick reprod trees. If you can drop him quick, more the better for you. I think you have a little more wiggle room with the .45 caliber bullet than with the .270.

    I don't think you're going to get a shot at more than 100 to 150 yards (any more than that and your probably trying to shoot over a canyon) on the long side. Take the extra oomph. Error on the big side rather than on the small. Have fun. I got shut out of tags this year, so my .300 Weatherby is getting dusty this season.
     
  12. AvnEng

    AvnEng Corvallis Member

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    I have hunted over there for many years now with a 270 and it has worked fine for me. You may have have chances of long shots depending on which unit you are hunting. Most of my shots have been within 100 yards.

    Just have a good pair of binoculars.
     
  13. Grizzly_A

    Grizzly_A Portland Metro Area Member

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    Of the 2 you have, either will work.
    Sounds like your .270 is ready for elk hunting, I'd just pick up some good hunting ammo using hunting bullets.

    Having hunted in Desolation unit near Granite.....I'd only need a weapon that can fire 75yds. All the elk I ran into were in the thick stuff...I had more need of an infrared scope than a big caliber.
     
  14. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    The .270 actually has more energy at distance than a 30.06. Some would call the 270 cartridge a necked down 30.06.

    The 270 cuts the wind better, loses less velocity and retains more energy (OK, it has a better cross-sectional density and a better aspect ratio) than an .06 at distance. It also shoots flatter than the .06 by quite a bit, and for the same reasons.

    I bought a .270 in 1970 and have hunted mule deer, elk, antelope, coyote - you name it.

    I use a 130 grain Remington Core-Lokt PSP for everything up to and including deer, and a 150 grain Nosler for elk.

    I never needed to cut an elk in half with a bullet. I save that chore for later. :)
     
  15. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    I forgot to add. I'm comfortable with that .270. That means a lot. I don't like swapping guns for each hunt.

    $.02
     
  16. JC9995

    JC9995 Greater "Clackamas" Active Member

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    .270 will be fine. I second the "Premium" vote for ammo choice. Winchester XP3 is a superb choice. I have taken elk with my .270 using this and other premium loads.
    Dont be suckered into thinking a 7mm is the minimum.... a .270 is so close to the 7mm in ballistics its not funny.
    Take the .270 and fill your freezer. Good luck.