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early Remington Model 10 questions

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by just dan, Sep 15, 2012.

  1. just dan

    just dan PDX Active Member

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    I have what I believe to be an early model 10.
    There are no date codes on the barrel, just the serial number. (73065)
    the receiver has the same serial

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    so far... i have no idea what year it is, but believe it may be prior to 1919 based on the serial and lack of date code on the barrel.

    the breachbolt is fubared... looks like someone took a welder and a file to it at some point in its life. I've seen complete breechbolt assemblies on the auction sites for ~$30. the stock is broken, but plenty of 'em out there.

    i got this thing a couple years ago for $25.

    i have no visions of using this for home security... no desire to sell it... something about it calls to me. love the way it looks.
    if i replace the breechbolt and clean it up- shoot lead shot on light loads...
    think it could be used as a fun shooter?
    any idea on the year?
    any idea if the parts interchange with those of later production model 10s?
    (fitting of such parts is understandable, just wonder if they're even the same)

    thanks!

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  2. ch139

    ch139 teh gehtoe Active Member

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    Call Remington at: 800-243-9700 to get a year of manufacture; all you have to do is give them the SN and they can usually give you the year of manufacture. Remington started doing their "barrel date codes in 1921, so it sounds like it was built before that.

    Thinking older guns like that were usually hand fitted so one might think a "new" bolt would need to be fitted... now finding a smith that knows what they're doing with old gun like this is going to be the real challenge. If you can find your own stock that would be great.

    Kinda cool the Remington Model 10 formerly known as the Remington Repeating Shotgun seems to appear in drawings on Remington literature as early as 1906 and patents as early as 1903. Also the Remington Model 10 (a Pedersen design) looks very similar on the outside to the Remington Model 17 (a Browning design - and the forerunner to the Ithaca Model 37) - on the inside the Model 10 and Model 17 are completely different guns. Remington sold a few Model 10A shotguns to the military for WWI (about 3500 IIRC) that are now the wet-dream for collectors ranked at the pinnacle only with the WWII Ithaca Model 37 trenchies. All cool old shotguns. Hope you're able to get yours sorted out.

    ETA: some neat info here: http://www.remingtonsociety.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=19054
     
  3. just dan

    just dan PDX Active Member

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    Just got off the phone with a lovely lady from Remington. I had never thought of calling them before, thank you for the suggestion!
    It is indeed a Remington Repeating Shotgun, manufactured in "early 1911, before the change to Model 10" by their records.

    I've got a breechbolt assembly coming in the mail.
    I'll look around for a stock to replace this quite broken and previously repaired one.
    I'm no smith, but grew up working on arms and was a machinist. I'll see about fitting... but i might look around for a 'smith that knows about these things.

    I'm hoping to take it duck hunting this season...
     
  4. just dan

    just dan PDX Active Member

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    fitted the fouled parts (action bar lock and pin)...
    repaired the stock (3M 30min "2500lb" epoxy)...

    went and put 40 rounds through it... not a hickup, wow it feels nice. this thing is going to put dinner on the table again...
     
  5. JJ Reich

    JJ Reich New Member

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  6. JJ Reich

    JJ Reich New Member

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    Hi,

    Just read your thread on the Remington Model 10 and decided to join the forum.

    I have one just like the one discussed. My serial number is U60047. It has a 27" barrel with a full choke. It appears to be a filed grade. From what I have read it was likely made sometime before 1910. Right?

    It was given to me by my nephew who was not into guns. But it had been passed down through his family in western Illinois through several generations.

    It's in great shape, no marring on the stock, the receiver and barrel are clean, no marks or scratches but a little shy on the bluing, but it works pretty good, nice and smooth. It has a simple problem loading shells from the magazine. It doesn't hold the second shell back so it jams two shells on the flipper.

    Solution is pretty simple, load one shell into the magazine then jack it into the chamber, then load one more shell into the magazine, no more, just one. When turkey hunting who gets more than two shots anyway? Any tips on that?

    So I will call the number you mentioned and see what information Remington can provide.

    Thanks for you information.
    JJ
     
  7. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Sounds like your ejector spring is either worn/bent, or the spring tension is weak.
    # 27 in the Numrich schematics on model 10's.
    These are riveted in and hard to replace.

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  8. JJ Reich

    JJ Reich New Member

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    Thanks, but it's not the injector. It ejects fine from the chamber. But if there are two shells in the magazine, both come out into the loader.

    JJ
     
  9. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    My mistake, I was thinking of a later model.
    Watch this video on the model 10 and at the 3:10 time mark look at the cartridge loading flap that has a spring loaded cartridge stop part which prevents the shell from coming back into the receiver.