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Dillon XL 650 and Euro brass

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by shoe, Sep 11, 2011.

  1. shoe

    shoe Carlton, OR Member

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    Have been noticing that any euro brass going through my Dillon get caught in the case ejection stage, anyone else notice this? 9mm RP, Fiocci, and S&B are the headstamps.

    Also on these casing with a RCBS Decap/resize die the primers don't always get punched all the way through, just almost come out and stop the machine as well. Although I don't notice this with my Lee resize/decap (which I bent the pin with brass I just discovered which will be posted seperately).
     
  2. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Fiocci and S&B brass should be treated just like military brass with a crimp. The edge of the primer pocket "mouth" is more square than most US produced brass. Just de-priming and swaging like one does with crimped brass solves the problem. Only have to do it once and the brass is good for many reloadings. Processing it separately like described will also help you identify those pieces that will hang in the shell plate. The S&B, as well as Fiocci brass also has a sharper edge on the extractor groove. This could be contributing to the difficult ejection from the reloader especially if it has been deformed in the pistol by the extractor/ejector.

    I don't have any problem with primers sticking when they leave the de-prime/size position. I used to but then bought a Dillon Sizing/De-Priming die with the spring loaded pin. When the case is forced into the die, the decapping pin causes an internal spring to compress. When the primer is free of the pocket, the spring then snaps the pin down and the spent primer is "flicked off" much in the manner that you would "flick something nasty off your finger". On many other dies the spent primer tends to stick to the end of the depriming pin and it is then pulled partly back into the primer pocket where it's re-seated at Station 2.

    Lastly, take a good look at both the grooves in the shell plate and the wire that pushes the finished cartridge out into the chute. If there is any gunk in the groove it could hang the cartridge and the wire should be straight where it slides the cartridge out, also free of "gunk".


    The R-P Brass is Remington and as far as I know it's not "Euro Brass". I have some other names for it though as it tends to be prone to premature splitting and loose primer pockets.