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Coins worth saving?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by JimmyS1985, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. JimmyS1985

    JimmyS1985 St.Louis Active Member

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    Im starting to check the dates on my coins a lot more. I haven't found a single silver quarter, I don't check my dime's religiously though and I know they made some of those in silver. Im thinking of saving all the pre-1982 pennies since they are 95% copper. I figure if copper ever goes through the roof, they will be worth way more than just their face value.

    Do any of you guys save your coins? I know a guy in the Paintless Dent Removal trade and I pay him with Morgan Silver Dollar's to train me in dent removal.
     
  2. Dunerunner

    Dunerunner You'll Never Know Well-Known Member

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    I don't want to hurt your feelings, but most circulating coinage has been cherry picked of rare dates and silver years ago. There may be a few that drift back into circulation when someone gets their hands on Grandpa's coin collection and they need a pack of smokes or a six pack of Old Milwaukee.

    I'd hang on to those Morgans.....
     
  3. Jackalope

    Jackalope Seattle New Member

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    Pulling a silver quarter out of your pocket would be a rare event. If you want to maximize your copper, start with Canadian pennies. From 1942 to 1996, Canadian pennies are 98% copper. No law against melting them down here either.
     
  4. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

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    US copper pennies are already worth about 2.5 cents in melt value.

    US nickels are all worth slightly more than 5 cents in melt value, although they were much higher a few years ago.

    Can't legally melt circulating US coinage, but its still 'money in the bank' as it were. I save copper pennies and nickels both.

    Current Melt Value Of Coins - How Much Is Your Coin Worth?
     
  5. Burt Gummer

    Burt Gummer Portland Completely Out of Ammo

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    Not to rub it in, but I bought a grandpa's coin collection about six years ago for $100. A half full bucket of 70% pre-64 coins. Told the lady they were worth a lot more than that and she said take it or leave it she wanted to get rid of the junk.

    It is worth about $5k now.
     
  6. JimmyS1985

    JimmyS1985 St.Louis Active Member

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    Hey at least you were honest. I got a local jewelry store that sells morgan silver dollars just above melt value if they are in poor-ok condition, and $35 for one in good condition. I don't think I can make much money off them at the moment, but if I save them I can.

    The reason I give them to a guy who does PDR is because he does like $70-$50 in dents for a $30-$35 Morgan Silver Dollar.

    Really I don't give a damn about the dents in my car, but Im 27 and its about time I start learning a trade so I can "pull myself up by my own boot straps" and make a living when I reach my 30's.

    On the other hand I could have my 4 year CCJ degree done as early as the end of this semester if I pass both classes which I probably will.
     
  7. Grunwald

    Grunwald Out of that nut job colony of Seattle, WA Well-Known Member

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    pre 64 coins are 90% silver (dimes and up).

    I worked my way through college as a cashier at a convinience store. I would check all coins for silver. You don't even have to check the year, just look at the side and if it is all silver colored then the coin is silver (dimes and above).
    I'd also checked the pennies to fish out all the wheat pennies.