Boat ownership vs Renting?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Bushman, Apr 14, 2013.

  1. Bushman

    Bushman
    Auburn, WA
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    I've historically gone fishing off the pier in Tacoma, but rented a boat for $65 the whole day off season (april or may) and enjoyed it. I didn't have to deal with all the random idiots on the pier, especially those that aren't actually fishing/crabbing.

    So, I've considered buying a cheap boat, just something to get me out in the water, not one of those fancy boats. But, I'm wondering what the total cost of ownership is.

    I drive a Honda Civic, so I'd likely need to buy a truck to haul the thing, which means insuranec, tabs, and maintenance on the truck.

    I presume boats need registration, maitenance, insurance, etc. as well. Add to that all the other fees I don't know about, and I'm wondering if I'm not just better off renting a boat $100 a day during the summer season, on the rare occasion that I will actually go fishing? I used to go a lot more at the dock, everyday after work, on weekends, etc.

    But last year or so I rarely go. I might go 5-8 times in the summer. So buy or rent?
     
  2. jbett98

    jbett98
    NW Oregon
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    I think you have answered your own question regarding the cost issue.

    I have owned boats for over thirty years and renting is by far the cheaper way to go if you are only using it a couple of time a year.
    I currently own a 14' aluminum Valco with custom made trailer and run a 9.9 short shaft on it.

    Only use it twice a year at most for crabbing, and after loading up all of the gear, checking the bearings and tires, filling up the fuel tank, driving all of it from Portland to the coast and back and then having to mess with all of the salt water clean up when I return, I can personally attest that renting a boat for the day is the way to go.

    Clean up, motor repairs, fuel cost, towing, storage, tags, theft, none of that is your concern when renting.
     
  3. DieselScout

    DieselScout
    S Clackamas County
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    Just to get it out of the way.

    they are a hole in the water to throw money into and boat stands for Break Out Another Thousand.

    It sounds like buy a boat for you will mean suddenly you've got two more vehicles to up keep. Lets say you can find a boat that will suit your fancy, for around a grand. Then a rig to pull it for another grand, so you're in $2000 already and you haven't done any title or registration on either yet, let alone maintenance or upkeep on either. Just off the bat, 2000/65 is 30 boat rentals. How many times are you going to go fishing and how long do you plan on keeping the boat? Would you go more if you had your own boat? Would you go places where you cannot rent? In the very long term it maybe better to buy, but I don't know the registration fees, or if they are yearly or bi-yearly. Also, something you haven't figured in is the cost of licensing the trailer, if it requires it.
     
  4. Bushman

    Bushman
    Auburn, WA
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    Thanks, I figured as much. For a rare use boat, 5-8 times a year, it does sound like renting is the better way to go.
     
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  5. kenboy

    kenboy
    salem, oregon
    GOD BLESS AMERICA Bronze Supporter

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    ADAMANTLY DISAGREE...... Nothing like the pride of owning your own boat........Ya wanna buy my boat????
     
  6. jbett98

    jbett98
    NW Oregon
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    Find a friend that will share the cost and all of the fun.
    Here's a tip on crabbing with the light weight cage style traps.
    Use a zip tie to put some weight on the swinging entrance gate of the trap. I use a 3/4" steel washer tied to the lower part of the gate.
    The incoming current can push open the unweighted gate and the crabs will force their way out after eating their fill.
    My catch rate more then doubled using this method. I only use turkey legs for bait, because the sea lions won't bother them.
     
  7. DieselScout

    DieselScout
    S Clackamas County
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    I forgot, the two happiest days of a boat owners life, the day you buy it and the day you sell it.
     
  8. Nwcid

    Nwcid
    Yakima and N of Spokane
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    There is a catch to owning vs renting stuff. In many cases if you own stuff you will use it more. If you dont have to plan ahead, work around the time of the owner, hope it is not being used by someone else, the money you have put into your own will usually mean more use.

    This is NOT to say it is cheeper because it is not.
     
  9. xlsbob

    xlsbob
    coos county
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    Boats go to crap pretty quick just sitting out in the yard so you want to figure in decent storage to your costs also. I actually own both an aluminum jet boat and a fiberglass boat and for the amount they get used I'd be money ahead renting.
     
  10. Redcap

    Redcap
    Lewis County, WA
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    If it flies, floats or f**ks, it is cheaper to rent it.
     
  11. PiratePast40

    PiratePast40
    Willamette Valley
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    That may make a good bumper sticker but not at all true for many of the boat owners I know.

    For realistic costs, expect to pay at least $5k for a decent boat and trailer. Your inspection needs to include a close inspection of the deck and structures for dry rot and stress damage if it's a fiberglass boat. Better yet, pay for a certified marine survey. You also need to look at what type of cover you want and if you would like to be out in less than sunny weather. Maintenance, repairs, storage, and operating costs can also eat a hole in your wallet. Not to say that I'm all for buying vs renting, just want to give some realistic expectations. Is it cheaper to rent at the numbers you're looking at - most likely. But having your own boat and going whenever and wherever you want is absolutely great!

    For a great boating forum, try iboats.com: iboats Boating Forums. You'll get plenty of good information on restoration, rebuilding, operation, and maintenance of your boat. And since they're real people on the forum, there are differing opinions!

    If you're the glass half full types, BOAT stands for "Best Of All Times" ;)
     
  12. teflon97239

    teflon97239
    Portland, OR
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    A few thoughts from a guy who owned 5 boats, 15-20 footers, over the decades...

    When I skied and fished 2-3 times a week, it was a no-brainer to own boats. Even when I paid extortionary bills for cooling impellers, head gaskets, gearboxes, etc. It was its own hobby/social situation (in San Diego, by the way, where you can go pretty much 12 months a year) and unthinkable not to have one - at least for awhile.

    Funny/sad thing is... boats tend to require steady upkeep whether you use them a lot or barely at all. I always had used boats, which probably need more TLC than new ones. Either way, unless you're a mechanic, boat repairs are ex-pen-sive.

    And where will you keep it? Sheltered? Out in the elements? Legal to park it without moving it at least once every 3 days? Vulnerability to theft?

    Those were some of the issues I had to contend with at various times. I've rented a few times since, and it seemed expensive, but that's all a matter of perspective if you've ever put thousands a year into keeping one working.
     
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  13. RVTECH

    RVTECH
    LaPine
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    I think most of it has to do with ones' specific boating 'environment' I live in an area of abundant lakes and a major river close by - but no real boat rental availability. Some of the more popular lakes like Crane Prairie and Paulina Lake offer rentals but it is expensive and limited to those lakes. So if you like to fish and want to take advantage of all the lakes in the Central Oregon area then ownership is a necessity.
     
  14. trainsktg

    trainsktg
    Portland OR
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    I have owned two kayaks for many years and am very happy with them. :thumbup:

    I used to own a very nice skiboat. Used to... :thumbdown:
    Keith
     
  15. trainsktg

    trainsktg
    Portland OR
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    OP, speaking of kayaks, since you are just looking at something to get you out in the water to fish, many folks are happy with this style of fishing kayak. In addition to the flipper drive (leaving your hands free) you can also add a fish finder, live well, trolling motor etc.

    Hobie Cat Company - Mirage Pro Angler 14

    That model is somewhat expensive as it is a dedicated fishing yak, but you can find them used or go with another model for less money and still outfit it quite nicely for fishing. They do maintain a pretty decent resale value too.

    I usually do a two or three day trip from Bonneville Dam to St. Helens in mine every year, depending if I wanna do 20 or 30 miles a day.

    Keith
     
  16. teflon97239

    teflon97239
    Portland, OR
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    +1 on kayaks for fishing, I'm avid in that dept. The hands-free Hobie looks cool if there's breeze or a current and you can't just drift.

    I needed to make a couple adjustments with my kayaks... a collapsing pole and a tiny tupperware tackle box with bare necessities to sit in my lap. Recovered more than a couple nice bass lures from low hanging branches out over the water, too!

    Currently looking for a short canoe (12-13') if anyone has one to sell/trade around Portland. Bonus points for one with an electric motor.
     
  17. ATCclears

    ATCclears
    Seattle area, WA
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    We rent when we want to get out on Lake Washington a couple of times each year. There is a great, family-owned business at Yarrow Bay Marina in Kirkland. I recommend you make a reservation well in advance if you want to rent on a busy day such as July 4 or Seafair weekend.

    Peter
     

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