.223 primer crimp reamer

6Corsa6

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I'm processing my first batch of .223 brass and got a hornady primer pocket reamer. Upon using it I noticed that it's reaming the side just a little as well as chamfering the edge. Before I go and possibly ruin over 1k rounds of brass what are your experienced thoughts on these pieces I already reamed.
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ma96782

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I have a reamer and Dillion 600 swage.

I like the reamer more because I can sort of pick up a case, ream, and be on to the next one really quick. As for the chamfer to the pocket, try seating some primers. Some people say that as long as a primer doesn't fall out.....you're GTG. Me, I don't re-use my .223 brass enough times to really care all that much. Plus, I don't anneal. Rrrright....I'm wasteful.

BTW.....I use a Lee hand primer. So the chamfer of the pocket actually helps, IMHO.

Aloha, Mark
 

ron

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It looks excessive to me. My swaged 223 does not look like that.I have no experience with the Hornady tool you are using. :oops:
I use a Dillon 600 swager and then a RCBS primer pocket uniformer as part of a RCBS prep station. I always check your swaged
brass by seating some primers. CCI primers are tighter fit. What you don't want is loose fit.o_O
 
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6Corsa6

6Corsa6

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This is the tool I got and just chucked it up to a cordless drill not going too crazy with the speed. I guess it both reams and chamfers.

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Right now I only have small pistol primers, might have time to run to sportsmans to get small rifle primers. My guess is that it would be a no no to put small pistol in the rifle cartridge
 
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ma96782

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As you gain/have more experience.......

You'll note that different brands of primers will have a different "feel" while seating them. For some people....that'll be a reason to choose or omit buying certain brands.

Yes....IMHO, sm rifle primers are better for sm rifle cartridges (see your manual). I have used on certain occasions sm rifle primers in my 9mm load (NOT the other way around). But, of course it's best to do what the manual says. Then know that certain sm rifle brands are more specific when loading them into .223 cartridges (Remington brand) comes to mind. And there is that thing about using magnum sm rifle primers when using them with ball powder loads. But if you use what your reloading manual says, you'll probably be safer that way. Always remember to start low and work your way up.

Later, you can maybe experiment a bit.

Aloha, Mark
 
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6Corsa6

6Corsa6

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Thanks for the info. Since I only have sm pistol primers right now I reamed a few 9mm and they came out with similar looking marks. I primed the reamed ones as well as some I didn't dream and I didn't notice a different feeling between the two
 

ma96782

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I was talking about the different "feel" while seating primers between brands of primers. Example : I use a LEE had primer tool. So, there is a big difference in the "feeling" (of the effort involved, to me) between CCI and Federal brand primers while trying to seat them. If you're using a primer tool on your press to seat primers, you might not feel the difference.

So bottom line : For me, there is a difference with the "feel" while seating various brands of primers. And, sometimes the feeding of primers from the magazine tray through the tool trough is also affected, when using my LEE hand primer tool.*

Why? When they measure the same diameter?

I don't know. But maybe, it's the construction materials or hardening of the metals that they used? Whatever.....IMHO, just use what works for you.

Anyway, for that reason.....I don't like CCI and prefer Federal primers. OK, Ok, ok....I also like Winchester. Also Note: What Remington says about their 6 1/2 primer vs the 7 1/2 primer (though both are sm rifle) when used for loading .223 Rem cartridges. As for the WOLF brand. Yes, I've also use them with success though they also have "special recommendations" for use when loading the .223 Rem cartridge.

Maybe, you'll never see a "shortage" in your life time. But, if you find a brand that you like, stock up. Same with "other reloading components".

Why??

Because, you never know who might get elected.

*IIRC...there was a warning included in the paperwork that came with the tool.

Aloha, Mark

PS.....I use CCI primers in conjunction with the press mounted priming method. LOL, I only have a few thousand remaining.
 
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Just remember that the more material you take off any case weakens it. EDIT: To a certain degree but as a general rule of thumb.
When I first started prepping .223/5.56 cases, I did the same thing and used to cut those crimps right out of there with reckless abandon. All you need to do is cut out enough for it to fit onto a primer pocket uniformer. I have the Lyman Case Prep Center and have all the necessary tools.

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In the past I’ve borrowed a Dillon super swagger for most of my 223/556 case swaging duties but recently I’ve picked up an RCBS swaging tool for my press and will never cut out another crimped pocket and those I come across go into the recycle bucket.

If you look closely at these primer pockets, they have been swaged and not cut so you can see that there’s no need to cut that much material out of the primer pocket.

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This thread got me to thinking so I went through the last 400 cases that I prepped recently, these were all range pick ups. Out of the 400 I found about eight that were really deep primer pocket chamfers (they went into the recycling bucket) and 5 with the correct amount removed.
If you can zoom in on the pic and notice the cases on the left-hand side are the correct chamfer crimp cut outs, the rest on the right hand side are all overboard IMHO.
If I were to use a reamer again, I would only cut so far and then look at the progress but I would never full seat ream them like those on the right hand side.
Plus another thing to the consider is to make sure that you hold your cases at the correct angle. YMMV.;)

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DLS

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I agree with you @Caveman Jim, the ones on the right are chamfered too much. The would probably shoot just fine but why chance it as .223 cases are cheap. I ream to the level seen on the cases to the left and find the small bevel helps seat primers. I bevel the pockets after I use a Dillon swadger ... overkill? Probably but the primers seem to seat much better this way.
 

gmerkt

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I won't use any tool that does anything to the walls of the primer pocket. I remove the crimp edge only and then only the bare amount necessary. Loose or semi-loose primers are not for me. I don't like burns in the faces of rifle bolts. I want primers tight. .223/5.56mm pockets stretch out fast enough on their own.

Plus another thing to the consider is to make sure that you hold your cases at the correct angle.
This. Using a cordless drill will tend to give you more room for error than using a drill press.
 
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Reaming and swage tools can both ruin primer pockets if used incorrectly. I think both can get the job done it's just a matter of personal preference. I will say I've seen more pockets ruined with a reamer over a swage tool because pockets are out of round or loose and primers don't stay seated. I run a CH4D pocket swager and I've yet to find a bad pocket when done. Swagged pockets are not a problem priming either. You can have good results either way just take the time to check every 10 or so as you process the brass.
 
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Some crimped primer pockets will need to be shaved enough to remove the crimping Lake City (LC do crimp the primer hole hard) as long as you reload the the brass and fire it without falling out you should be fine... I had few that did not like thinner primers and always fell out of the hole after shooting the round...
 
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Some crimped primer pockets will need to be shaved enough to remove the crimping Lake City (LC do crimp the primer hole hard) as long as you reload the the brass and fire it without falling out you should be fine... I had few that did not like thinner primers and always fell out of the hole after shooting the round... 223 normally not annealed, ex 223 PMC nor but PMC 556 55gr is and 556 62gr is (556 primers also supposed to be sealed with wax)
 
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One other thing I discovered about primers is the small pistol magnum primers are the same as small rifle primers.
Don't take my word for it , check with the manufacture, but be sure you talk with someone in the company who knows this information, not just the receptionist
 
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I prefer swaging over reaming. The primers seat more snug and I suspect the rod inside the swaging die flattens flash hole burrs inside the case. I do occasionally ream and just love my Lyman case prep station as pictured above.
Chucking a cordless drill onto my Forster case trimmer makes short work prepping cases.
 
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One other thing I discovered about primers is the small pistol magnum primers are the same as small rifle primers.
Don't take my word for it , check with the manufacture, but be sure you talk with someone in the company who knows this information, not just the receptionist
This has been asked and debated on several reloading forums across the great Googlenet.....Both sides have replied and I've seen both answers posted as whether there is a difference so I inquired myself. I leave you this to ponder.

Subject: TechnicalServices/CCI
Question:
Is there a difference in Small Rifle vs Small Pistol Magnum primers? I find several postings quoting CCI reply there is NOT a difference.
cciexpert cciexpert@vistaoutdoor.com via bounce.exacttarget.com
May 18, 2020, 12:33 PM (10 days ago)
to Jory45acp
Jory,
There are differences between the two and we would not suggest using one in place of the other. You will want to find the CCI 550s if that is what your load data is calling for.
Thanks,

Cody B./Technical Service Rep.
CCI/Speer/Alliant
2299 Snake River Ave.
Lewiston, ID 83501
(866)286-7436
 
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I use a go/no go gauge on my .223 primer pockets. This gives me some piece of mind when loading a batch of rounds that may potentially not get used for a long time. I just purchased the same Hornady tool to remove military crimps and intend to use it in my Franklin Armory case prep center. In the past I used a Dillon swager but sold it. I purchased the gauge from BALLISTIC TOOLS 540-685-1009. They sell a pack that also includes a neck tension tool.
 

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