1911 Model 70 jams

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One of my Colt 1911's had a similar issue and I installed a new Wolff recoil spring that was 1 lb. heavier if I recall correctly.
I think it slowed the slide down just enough to allow it to feed more reliably, but that's just a guess on my part.
I really like Wolff recoils spring packs, as they allow you to swap up or down, depending on the type of ammo you're shooting.
When JB designed the 1911 the original spring weights were for a 14lb recoil, and a 23lb mainspring, when the ammo was changed from 200gr to 230gr then the recoil spring was changed to 16lb.
Increasing the weight of the recoil spring has little to do with a failure to feed, in fact, in many cases it makes the situation worse by increasing the slide velocity in the forward travel,, the slide speed can overpower the ability of the magazine to get the incoming round up into proper position.
The main resistance to the slide opening is the mainspring, a heavy recoil spring helps a small amount, but the mainspring does most of the work.
The key to reliable feeding regarding spring weights is to have enough "dwell time" when the slide is in the rearward position.
Of course this assumes that the feed ramp and barrel mouth are smooth and properly orientated with each other.
If the gun won't run with a 16lb recoil and a 23lb main, then their are other issues that need to be addressed.
 
OP
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The last issue the bullet could be seen jammed on the feed ramp. By the end of the day I moved onto having fun with my Mossburg. The jams were after about 2-3 magazines so about after about 20 shots or so. That's why I was wondering about magazines I have Colt, Wilson, and Remington. I'd stick with factory magazines but they aren't always available.
 
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Is the feeding issue present throughout the magazine, during the first rounds or the last in the mag?

What brand and type of hp ammo was it?

the ones with the polymer tip seem to feed the worst on my 1911’s. I avoid them completely.
 
OP
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Good question. Towards the end. Cheap ammo dunno the brand. They do have more powder now I think about it. Too much for me. I got a big bag to shoot. I'll polish the feed ramp today. She needs a scrub down anyway :)

Oh I was shooting reloads RN (I have to practice $$$) They were fine.

So no worries about the ejector?
 
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If feeding issues are happening in the end of the mag it can indicate week mag springs or a too strong recoil spring.
The rounds need time to present at the top of the mag.
If the slide overruns the round it can cause a nosedive.
This effect can be lessened with lighter hollow points, but replacing the mag springs might solve it.
Gunk in the mag tube will exacerbate or even cause this issue in its own. Another type of feeding issue can be caused by a too tight extractor, but the malfunction cause by the extractor will be consistent throughout the magazine.
 

po18guy

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1. Kratex (rubber with abrasive in the mix) bit with a Dremel. Slowly. Polish and shoot. Repeat as necessary. Can't put frame back, but you can always buy a new barrel.
2. That original barrel may only need throating - depending.
3. Got Dykem or Prussian blue? Put a very thin layer on the contact face of frame and slide at full recoil. Only one surface and not both. If it transfers to the other surface after firing, you need a higher rate recoil spiring in any event.
4. Bad timing, but there are vastly different HPs on the market. Even a Series 70 will like one of them. I have good luck with Magtech 230s. They have a huge cavity - rather like Speer Gold Dot, but enough jacket wrap around so that lead does not touch ramp.
5. A nice semi-custom fit Bar-Sto barrel will remove all doubt, while costing the same as some 'smithing.
6. An awful lot of 1911 stoppagers are mag related. "I" would try Chip McCormick mags, MecGar and ACT/Wolff. They are all very nicely made with the ACT/Wolff having a notably slick finish for less friction. If mags don't work, someone here will always snap them up.
7. Let's not shortchange our gunsmiths. Nothing like a seasoned eye and hand to doctor up a recalcitrant semi.
8. It can be frustrating, but once it is right, it stays right.
 

bbbass

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The jams were after about 2-3 magazines so about after about 20 shots or so.
This is telling me that you aren't lubing up the gun adequately prior to shooting it... as I said, I had the same problem shooting my Para after I first bought it. You might want to try one of the super lube synthetics... they are really slick! The one I used on the rails and hammer just prior to shooting a match is Red's Synthetic Gun Lube. But there are others. Breakfree used to make one called "Lightning". If you are relying on Rem oil with silicone, or CLP (which dries out with the gun stored between shoots) after cleaning, it's not adequate for the rails. Use a superlube just prior to shooting!!
 
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bbbass

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BTW, I found this for general interest in the functioning of 1911 springs: https://www.m1911.org/technic26.htm

Browning's original design for this interface provided slightly undersquare hammer hooks of about 1/32nd inch long, and a matching...or agreeing angle on the sear. This provided a captive engagement that tended to force the two parts together more positively. Browning did this because he understood inertia and how easily that those surfaces could disengage under its effect. This captive engagement provided a margin for error that made the gun less likely to burst-fire, but didn't do much for the trigger pull because as the trigger is pulled, it actually pushes the hammer farther back against mainspring tension. Triggers in ordnance-spec pistols generally ran from 6 to 8 pounds, depending on other factors. Safe, but not conducive to precision shooting....which wasn't the intent anyway.

When the slide recoils and cocks the hammer, the event is fairly violent. The hammer overcocks, bounces off the grip safety tang, and the mainspring forces it back down. The face of the hammer hits the slide, and bounces again before it settles down. The slide returns to battery, and the hammer falls further, and is stopped by the sear primary angle catching the hooks.

The slide goes fully to battery, and depending on how smoothly it chambers the round, jerks the pistol forward and slightly down. The hammer, being on a pivot via the pin, obeys Newton's law, tries to stand still, and breaks the contact with the hooks to some degree. If the mainspring is weak, it breaks contact more easily.
 
This is telling me that you aren't lubing up the gun adequately prior to shooting it... as I said, I had the same problem shooting my Para after I first bought it. You might want to try one of the super lube synthetics... they are really slick! The one I used on the rails and hammer just prior to shooting a match is Red's Synthetic Gun Lube. But there are others. Breakfree used to make one called "Lightning". If you are relying on Rem oil with silicone, or CLP, after cleaning, it's not adequate for the rails. Use a superlube just prior to shooting!!
White Lithium Grease, can pick it up at Freddys in the automotive section. Slippery as snot, stays where you put it, won’t break the bank. Just a dab will go a long way... Never have a problem with my auto loaders functioning. Handgun or shotgun...
F005EE17-6ECD-4C6D-AF36-987B89FDC364.jpeg
 

bbbass

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White Lithium Grease, can pick it up at Freddys in the automotive section. Slippery as snot, stays where you put it, won’t break the bank. Just a dab will go a long way... Never have a problem with my auto loaders functioning. Handgun or shotgun...
View attachment 781013
No thanx. Clean up is much easier with the synthetic slick lubes. If I was going to use "grease" on 1911 rails, it would be Tetra fluoropolymer penetrating grease, but I use that only on my Glocks... just a lil dab il do ya!! A light bead of Red's applied with a needle dropper lasts an entire match on any 1911/2011 rails, 150rds, does not attract dirt, dust, and lint, and requires no cleanup unless one wants to... I always clean my match guns after each use, but with slick lube the rails don't really need it.

I once used lithium on my AR BCG. After the typical fouling inside an AR, It was a total PITA to clean up. I no longer "grease" the BCG and use lube instead for a much easier cleaning session. CLP works fairly well if I'm not going to store it for very long (CLP dries out), and I use slick lube on the bolt rather than leaving the CLP on it. Grease is too heavy IMO, even tho I know that's what the military manual specifies.

(Edited for spelling and punctiation)
 
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