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WWII HI POWER

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by BEN LILLY, May 26, 2016.

  1. BEN LILLY

    BEN LILLY Lincoln City, OR NRA LIFE MEMBER Bronze Supporter

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    A friend has this hi power believes from
    WWII anyone know about these?
    He is wanting $900 for it.
     
  2. AndyH

    AndyH Keizer, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    might be able to help, would need to see better pics
     
  3. BEN LILLY

    BEN LILLY Lincoln City, OR NRA LIFE MEMBER Bronze Supporter

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  4. old11bravo

    old11bravo Everett, Washington Well-Known Member

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    I could date it for you with the serial #

    Hi-Power Pistol



    The 9mm Hi-Power pistol was introduced to the U.S. market in 1954. Serial numbers from 1954 through 1957 are estimates only. From 1958 on, better records were kept and the serial numbers are more accurate. The 40 S&W caliber was introduced in 1994. This pistol is still in production today.

    To find your serial number, you will need to refer to your owner's manual. We have most owner's manuals online.

    Date Historic Information Serial Number Info
    1954-57 The Hi-Power 9mm pistol was introduced in 1954. 70000-80,000
    Accurate production figures are unavailable.
    1958 In 1958 Browning kept better records of the Hi-Power pistol, so the serial number ranges are more accurate 80001-85276
    1959 85268-89687
    1960 89688-93027
    1961 93028-109145
    1962 109146-113548
    1963 113549-115822
    1964 In 1964 the product code for the Hi-Power was the letter "T" 115823-T136-568
    1965 T136569-T146372
    1966 T146373-T173285
    1967 T173286-T213999
    1968 T214000-T258000
    1969-75 In 1969 Browning started using two digits for the date of manufacture which was followed by a four digit code that identified the type of Auto-5:
    C=Hi-Power
    This was then followed by the serial number beginning with 1000.
    Example: 69C1000 = A 1969 Hi-Power pistol with a serial number of 1000. T258001-261000
    C=Hi-Power
    1976-1997 In 1975 Browning standardized its serial number identification which it followed until 1998.
    1. Hi-Power Type 2W5=40 S&W
    245=9mm
    2. Date of Manufacture
    is a two digit code Z=1
    Y=2
    X=3
    W=4
    V=5
    T=6
    R=7
    P=8
    N=9
    M=0
    3. Serial Number
    beginning with 01001
    at the start of each year.

    Serial
    Number Example:
    245RT01001

    This would be a 9mm Hi-Power pistol, manufactured in 1976 with the serial number 01001.

    1998 In 1998 Browning redid the standardization of its serial number identifications to work with its new data base program, Oracle.
    1. Hi-Power Type 510=Hi-Power
    2. Date of Manufacture
    is a two digit code Z=1
    Y=2
    X=3
    W=4
    V=5
    T=6
    R=7
    P=8
    N=9
    M=0
    3. Serial Number
    beginning with 01001
    at the start of each year.

    Serial
    Number Example:
    510NN01001

    This would be a 9mm Hi-Power pistol, manufactured in 1999 with the serial number 01001.
     
    clearconscience likes this.
  5. BEN LILLY

    BEN LILLY Lincoln City, OR NRA LIFE MEMBER Bronze Supporter

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  6. BEN LILLY

    BEN LILLY Lincoln City, OR NRA LIFE MEMBER Bronze Supporter

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    ScanAttachment-3.jpg ScanAttachment-3.jpg ScanAttachment-3.jpg ATT00000-5.jpg
     
  7. pdxPope

    pdxPope East Multnomah Co. (the DMZ) Member

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    Can't really tell much about the gun from those pictures, but I'm pretty sure that holster is for a commercial Luger.
     
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  8. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    By no means am I an expert but I believe this is correct.
    And 900 for a wwII model seems low. Especially if that was the original holster.
     
  9. pdxPope

    pdxPope East Multnomah Co. (the DMZ) Member

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    Ok, as I am NOT a BHP expert take all of this with a grain or two...

    From what I can see from your pics; the s/n puts it before Nazi occupation & manufacture (mid 1940, iirc), but not much. Best guess would be 1938ish.
    Also don't see any Waffenampts.
    The hammer is probably a replacement.
     
  10. AndyH

    AndyH Keizer, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I would concur in regards the the dating, the hammer could be original as it appears from the pic to be the correct style for the period. the Waffenampts are the cost common indicator for a german occupation hi power. Can you post a Pic of the other side of the gun?
     
  11. BEN LILLY

    BEN LILLY Lincoln City, OR NRA LIFE MEMBER Bronze Supporter

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  12. BEN LILLY

    BEN LILLY Lincoln City, OR NRA LIFE MEMBER Bronze Supporter

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  13. BEN LILLY

    BEN LILLY Lincoln City, OR NRA LIFE MEMBER Bronze Supporter

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  14. pdxPope

    pdxPope East Multnomah Co. (the DMZ) Member

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    Ahhh, there's the little bugger...
    Immediately to the left of the slide serrations looks to be the acceptance stamp (Waffenampt). It should be a tiny eagle with a swastika in it's talons and the code WaA06 or something like it.
    There SHOULD be a matching mark much smaller on the frame, usually near the trigger guard.
     
  15. William Jones

    William Jones Longview Wa Member

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    Very interesting piece. Open to trades?
     
  16. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Do you think the grips have been replaced?
     
  17. BEN LILLY

    BEN LILLY Lincoln City, OR NRA LIFE MEMBER Bronze Supporter

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    That is it. Thanks for the info. A year ball park value guess? Or know anyone who has intrest in college ting these things.?
     
  18. pdxPope

    pdxPope East Multnomah Co. (the DMZ) Member

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    Well, that's the $64 question, isn't it? :cool:

    Again, I'm not a Hi-Power expert by any stretch of the imagination. However, I have done some collecting, so I will offer some general collectors observations...

    That pistol has some good things going for it: it's a relatively early gun, made before the Germans occupied the FN factory (and quality went in the toilet), yet it does have waffenampts. (Possibly an officer's private, commercial, purchase that he had 'arsenalized'?)
    The frame, slide and barrel serial numbers match. (As I'm not a BHP expert, I don't know what else is serialized, but you'd have to disassemble it to find that out.) There are no import marks, so it came to the US pre 1968, possibly a wartime bring-back. And it seems to have honest wear appropriate for a 75 year old combat vereran.
    The holster, while not correct for the gun, may have some value to a Luger collector, assuming it's not a reproduction.

    Now for the warts: I believe the hammer, grips and magazine are not the originals. While congruent with the proper type, they are in much better condition than the rest of the gun. Which brings us to the crux of the biscuit; the condition. It hasn't been reblued, chromed or pakerized (as so many were in the 1950's and '60's,) so that's good, but unfortunately the bluing is almost gone and the overall condition is only fair.

    Assuming (yup, there it is) everything works as it should, and it shoots accurately I would put it in the "cool old shooter" catagory and value it closer to $600.

    But, again, I'm not a BHP guy, so my valuation could be way, way off.
    Does your friend have any history on the gun?
     
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  19. William Jones

    William Jones Longview Wa Member

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    I think that the original price of $900 is probably a good place to start. A quick check of Gunbroker shows Hi powers of that era start in that range. Is there any history with this piece?
     
  20. Velzey

    Velzey Estacada, Oregon Gunsmith Gunsmith Bronze Vendor Bronze Supporter

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    pdxPope and GOG like this.