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Why no love for modified mosins?

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by Krazyrngr, Aug 10, 2010.

  1. Krazyrngr

    Krazyrngr Tacoma Member

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    Just curious why some people have such a dislike for this being modified? I just bought one recently with a Monte Carlo stock and to me think it looks alot better then the original wood stock, told the guy about it at a gun shop today and he said I ruined a good rifle. I mean it's not like there's a shortage of these rifles, and for so many sites to have aftermarket parts for this means there's gotta be some market. Just was curious how you guys feel on this subject
     
  2. Unka-Boo

    Unka-Boo Milwaukie Active Member

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    Same thing is happening to MNs as was to Mausers in the 50s and 60s....GLUT of cheap guns, "amateur gunsmiths" and aftermarket parts.

    To each their own, but for me, I see it as what it is, a collectible military rifle. Bare bones basic. They were not made for scopes, ( ya, save for the sniper models...) synthetic stocks or muzzle brakes.....

    For the amount of money you put into trying to make a Mosin a " hunting " rifle, you could have bought a new Savage or Stevens and been light years ahead....

    ( or you can buy someone else's abortion for $60 on the used rack...:bluelaugh: )
     
    mjbskwim and (deleted member) like this.
  3. coctailer

    coctailer Portland, OR/Hastings, MI/Vancouver,WA I run with scissors.

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    I think they look great the way they were originally made.

    "Lipstick on a pig" comes to mind.
     
  4. coctailer

    coctailer Portland, OR/Hastings, MI/Vancouver,WA I run with scissors.

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    I think they look great the way they were originally made.

    "Lipstick on a pig" comes to mind.
     
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  5. lowspeed-highdrag

    lowspeed-highdrag Oregon New Member

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    I'm cool with it as long as its well done. I think thats the key. Well done.And evey time Bubba has a go at it, all the other intact Mosins get a little more valuable.

    In fact, every time I see a Big 5 ad in the Sunday paper, I think about it. Seems like it might be a fun way to spend my lunch money, without much risk. Worse comes to worse, I screwed up a $99 dollar rifle. Sell off the aftermarket parts, and bury the evidence in the back yard. Still 16,999,999 to go.
     
  6. Ballistic

    Ballistic Salem, Oregon Active Member

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    I don't like "modified" old guns. It hurts to see a beautiful rifle with holes drilled in it and the stock cut up.

    I saw a near mint condition Swedish Mauser from 1906 with the receiver drilled for a scope.:( To me, that just ruins the gun.

    The one i really don't get is when people buy a Mosin with a 29 inch barrel and cut it down to 22 inches. Come on, if you want a short barrel, just buy one.
     
  7. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

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    I think it's fine if you're not taking a rare example of the weapon and bastardising it. Leave the '47 and '48 M44s alone and hack up that 44/45 all you want. Don't touch the early 91/30s and tear away at the '42s. Makes mine more rare and valuable.
     
  8. raftman

    raftman Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    What looks best is probably a subjective matter, but assuming the nice condition, I think old military rifles just about always look better when in original condition than somehow sporterized. Whether Mosin, Mauser, Arisaka, SKS, or whatever else. Some "modifications" are better than others, but generally speaking, I wouldn't even consider buying a sporterized mil-surp rifle. If I wanted a sporter rifle, I'd buy one that was actually made for that purpose... there's no shortage of options.
     
  9. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    I see two sides to the argument. First, I've seen people buy $40 mausers and spent nearly a thousand dollars turning them into marginal deer rifles. This is retarded, because you took a cheap gun that shoots cheap ammo, and bolted a bunch of crap onto it, and now expect everyone who just bought a $500 howa to bow down before you. (I'm not saying you do, but this is an attitude I've seen before) The second argument, is if you bought one of these old guns and the stock warps, rots or breaks, putting a new stock on it isn't that much of an insult to most. But when you start putting EOtech's on SKSs, is when we start drawing the line.
     
  10. coop44

    coop44 Tacoma ,WA Well-Known Member

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    I have seen many old mausers etc made into works of art, but for every one of those I have seen a hundred botched up. The quality of those parts out there to sporterize mosins, well how else can I put it, is pure crap. I am waiting to see some nice reproduction stocks in military configuration, made of walnut, and someone who is reforging bolt handles. how anyone can look at a polymer stocked mosin with a hacked barrel and screwed on bolt handle without throwing up, is puzzling.
     
  11. speelyei

    speelyei Willamette Valley Active Member

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    how about no love for Mosins, period?

    Just don't like em. Never have. Nothing about them is particularly appealing, and they are as common as can be, and all the tacticool BS in the world won't change that.

    If somebodys going to modify/sporterize/bubba/play with anything, it might as well be a Mosin.
     
  12. toobigtofail

    toobigtofail PDX Member

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    I'm not a fan of sporterizing. Why would you bob the stock? It won't make it more accurate. It just destroys the historical value of the rifle. Some stuff, on the other hand, I understand. A good long eye relief scope mount on a Mosin rear sight might yield a rifle suitable for hunting. I GET THIS. But a cut or a synthetic stock? Not so much.
     
  13. Minisocks

    Minisocks Portland Member

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    Their price is pretty appealing.
     
  14. raftman

    raftman Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Oh there's plenty of love for Mosins period.


    ...At least among those of us with taste. :laugh:
     
  15. cbdolphin

    cbdolphin Corvallis, OR WTB Spikes Tactical Lowers, cash in hand!

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    I think people way overreact because to the "bubbaing" of Mosins. I personally wouldn't modify any semi-rare, rare rifles, but some are a dime a dozen.

    As to putting on synthetic stocks? Why not? What does it really matter? It's not like you can't put it back into the wooden stock anyways. For 250-300 bucks, you can get a decent bolt action gun, with a sporter stock and scope that costs 20-25 cents as opposed to .75+cents for the other popular bolt action rounds.

    I had a Mosin, didn't care for them much. I got tired of having the shellac flake off onto my hands and turning them red, so I restained the thing. I had thoughts of throwing a synthtic stock on it, a scope mount and a decent scope.

    I'd much rather have a sporterized mosin than I can go out and shoot 75-100 rounds out of and not feel the pain in my pocket book as opposed to dropping more money on a lower end Savage/Howa etc and not be able to afford to shoot more than maybe 20-30 rounds.

    Not everyone can afford to practice with the price of the common hunting calibers and a sporterized mosin makes a cheap, effective hunting rifle that people can practice with.

    Just because it isn't your cup of tea, doesn't mean everyone who is sporterizing a Mosin is "destroying historical pieces" or anything to that extent.
     
  16. toobigtofail

    toobigtofail PDX Member

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    Let me acknowledge that Mosin owners have the right to do whatever they want to their rifles. It's not like good Mosin examples are going to all go away. So go ahead and bob your stock, or pitch it and put on a plastic one. Just bear in mind that you will get a diminished price for the firearm when you sell it.
     
  17. NorthernBornRebel

    NorthernBornRebel Keizer Member

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    So would it be bad if I converted my 91/30 to a Obrez?
     
  18. sweetbeard

    sweetbeard Beavertown OreGUN! New Member

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    Not really I am doing one :thumbup:

    suppressed...................................................................................................................................
     
  19. Krazyrngr

    Krazyrngr Tacoma Member

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    That is exactly why I bought one, im not fond of the way the wood looks on them they just seem bulky to me. I own a rem700 in 30-06 and it does cost around $18-$22 per box of 20, Ive seen people selling that surplus ammo in 7.62x54 for around $25 per 100. I dont really plan on using my mosin for hunting but just as a cheeper method of shooting, and after adding the long eye relief scope I think it looks pretty darn good even if some think its now worthless

    BTW those pistol versions look badass, wonder if they make a synthetic stock for them. I just see me shooting one and my arm spinning like an old gi joe
     
  20. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    Guns are like cars. If everyone had taken perfect care of their old hot-rods and trucks, if they hadn't bolted on performance parts to take them to the track, raced them around corners and mountain roads, then they'd all still be here and they wouldn't be worth near as much.
    Guns are a personal thing. If it doesn't work for you the way it is, make it work for you. While I generally suggest letting a pro do the work so the finished product is a bit nicer, do what works for you. Personally, I have four sporterized Mil-Surps. One is a turk mauser that came to me as just an action. It was already drilled and tapped. It had already been surface ground to remove the hump on the rear bridge. It now has a .257 Roberts A.I. barrel, new shroud, trigger, and, as soon as I can afford it, a new stock. Another is a Siamese Mauser that also came to me as a bare action. Its been welded up and I'm reworking the metal now. It needs a new bolt (a modified turk bolt will do), but already has a new barrel waiting for it. Two others are Swedes that also came with clipped stocks. I just finished the job. New barrels, new stocks, triggers, etc.

    So the way I figure it, there are enough half finished jobs out there that finding one to play with should be easy enough. Killing a pristine mil-surp would be kind of like taking a mint condition 57' Chevy and putting a fiberglass body kit on it. But go to a gunshow or pawnshop, and you can find any number of half-sporterized mil-surps to play with. If you prefer original condition guns, put it back to original. Find a new stock and hardware. If you like sporterized guns, finish the job. Add a new barrel, maybe a new trigger, maybe a new stock.

    As for the specific OP, Mosins are okay guns. I don't think the design really leads to a top-notch custom rifle, but they are decent guns. And if a sporterized Mosin in a ramline synthetic stock does a job for you, more power to you. Those with original Mosins thank you for making theirs more valuable (oh wait, there's MILLIONS of them ;))...