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What are some guns that resemble this?...

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by Razloga, Feb 24, 2010.

  1. Razloga

    Razloga Oregon Member

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    I really like (for reasons unknown to me..) when things are symmetrical..

    I watched "Shoot 'Em Up" again and noticed that one of the guns (a Taurus PT92 AFS) looks beautiful..

    400px-TaurusPT92AFSwBlack.jpg

    I don't really like how the gun looks from the side.. The part that really appeals to me is this top view..

    600px-SEUPT92AFS-6.jpg

    See how the slide opens to reveal the bullet instead of a normal cut out to one side?

    Are there any other guns like this?

    Does any of this make any sense or am I crazy?..
     
  2. ericlee748

    ericlee748 Seattle New Member

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    I believe that gun is very close to a Beretta M92 (or vice versa I suppose).

    I've never seen one cocked back like that, but I believe both guns use an exposed barrel design, so that's why it looks that way.
     
  3. Razloga

    Razloga Oregon Member

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    Hmm.. I was hoping for something in the .45 caliber...
     
  4. xjjeeper223

    xjjeeper223 Medford Active Member

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    Taurus ripped off Beretta. Beretta's 92 family of guns is better looking and better built than the Taurus ones. Generally more expensive too.

    Also, I'm pretty sure that Desert Eagles have a similar open slide design. They obviously look much different other than that though.
     
  5. tac

    tac UK, Oregon and Ontario. Well-Known Member

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    As noted above, the Taurus is a clone of the Beretta design. Not the other way round.

    Piettro Beretta is the oldest registered company on the planet, with its foundations set firmly in the early fifteenth century, well before Columbus set sail.

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and for sure the Beretta/Taurus looks nice, but it has a grip about the same size as my .44 Mag Desert Eagle, and is as wieldy - in MY paws - as a 4x2.

    tac
     
  6. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

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    The Taurus was originally a Beretta built in a Beretta plant in Brazil.
    Taurus makes it sound better than some historians. There was a point when Brazil nationalized most of their industry and Beretta's manufacturing there was absorbed at that point, and later re-privatized.
     
  7. watcher

    watcher West of Portland Member

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    The Beretta is a development of the WW2 German P38, known post-war as the P1. They share many common features, including the extremely reliable open breech area.
     
  8. .45's and .38's

    .45's and .38's Happy Valley OR Well-Known Member

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    Is this comment true? Thats interesting :)
     
  9. elsullo

    elsullo Portland Oregon New Member

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    I'm always impressed by the scholarly comments from people who have never even handled or owned a particular gun, or known the actual history behind it.

    The Taurus PT series is based upon Beretta's original design, with frame-mounted safety levers that click DOWN to disengage. It can be usefully carried "cocked-and-locked." This is most important for users who want to make a safe-carried gun ready for firing action.

    The Beretta M9 series is substantially changed from the original, including a chrome-lined barrel for military acceptance. It has slide-mounted safety levers that click UP to disengage. It can't be usefully carried "cocked-and-locked." This is most important for users who want to make a combat carried gun safe from firing.

    A user's particular needs will define which version is best for them. I have seen no discussion on many different gun messageboards over many years indicating that either manufacturer uses superior materials or workmanship than the other. I can only speak for the one particular gun that I owned, and will forever regret being forced to sell. It was a Taurus PT92 and the fit, finish, materials, and functioning were utterly flawless. The sights needed improvement, but the accuracy was excellent. I will someday own another Taurus..........................elsullo :thumbup:
     
  10. asiparks

    asiparks PDX Active Member

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    speaking of one thing influencing another, if you want to see taurus PT92 in action, rent John Woo's "the Killer" (you should also rent "hard boiled" on principal)

    Jump ahead to 2:12

    save the babies !!!
    Those two films influenced the choreography for just about every modern day shoot em up....

    hard boiled

    forward to about 4:30

    Oh, and I have both the Beretta and the Taurus. The brazilian is every bit as well made and reliable as the Italian and the frame mounted safety/decocker is a huge plus...

    in here somewhere along with a coupla P 38's:
     
  11. tac

    tac UK, Oregon and Ontario. Well-Known Member

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    Sir - I don't post lies.

    The location of Gardone Val Trompia in Lombardy, home of Beretta, is the historically accepted location of the emerging Italian arms industry in the renaissance period. A centre of high-quality weapons producers, from as early as 1350, it became the centre for the burgeoning small-arms manufacturers who congregated here in large numbers to benefit from the trade knowledge that was passed around by the guild system employed in renaissance Italy by the regional kings and dukes.

    Beretta is one of the world's oldest corporations, and it has been owned by the same family for some five hundred years. The Beretta company was established in 1526, when gunsmith Maestro Bartolomeo Beretta of Gardone Val Trompia (Brescia, Lombardy, Italy) was paid 296 ducats in payment for 185 arquebus barrels by the Arsenal of Venice. The bills of sale for the order of those firearms are in the firm's archives.

    THIS is from Beretta's own home page - '...The oldest among them, Fabbrica d’Armi Pietro Beretta S.p.A. (Pietro Beretta arms manufacturing company), which has been handed down over fifteen generations, was active in the village of Gardone Val Trompia in the fifteenth century. Documentary evidence for the family business dates back to 1526.'

    THIS is from the official history -

    'Company History:
    Fabbrica D' Armi Pietro Beretta S.p.A., maker of James Bond's trusty .25 caliber Beretta pistol, is the oldest manufacturing firm in the world. Amazingly, a single family has controlled the company throughout its history, which has spanned from ancient guilds to computerized robotics. In 1985, Beretta won a hotly contested bid to replace the Colt .45 in the U.S. arsenal. However, sporting arms comprise about three-quarters of Beretta's production; most of these are exported.

    16th Century Origins
    The home of Fabbrica D'Armi Pietro Beretta S.p.A. is the village of Gardone, in the center of the northern Italian valley known as Val Trompia. Iron ore in the hills of northern Italy made the area an iron-working center from the Middle Ages.
    Bartolomeo Beretta was born in 1490. The earliest documentary evidence of his forge is a contract from the Doges of Venice, dated October 3, 1526, for 185 'arquebus' barrels. (The harquebus was a type of musket so heavy it had to be propped up with supports. Beretta's first product was quite a contrast to the handguns for which it later became known.)
    The operation may well pre-date the year 1526 from which the company counts its anniversaries. In his extensive history, The World of Beretta, R.L. Wilson cites an 1860 account of a flood in the Mella Valley, which indicated the forge 'bore the date AD 1500 carved on its lintel.' Since medieval custom dictated that only sons of master craftsmen could become masters themselves, it is also quite possible that Bartolomeo was not the first Beretta to make gun barrels.
    Bartolomeo had a son, Jacomo, and a grandson, Giovannino, who became a master gun barrel maker. Another grandson, Lodovico, established a gun lock fabrication trade.
    At the middle of the 16th century, Val Trompia had 50 mines, eight smelteries, and 40 smithies. It produced 25,000 guns a year, mostly for export, as well as various other types of iron and steel goods. (During the war between Venice and Turkey in 1570, production more than tripled to 300 weapons per day.)
    Giovanni Antonio Beretta designed his own breech-loading cannons in 1641, but it is unclear whether they were ever built. In the late 1600s, the Beretta clan was involved in a deadly feud with the Chinellis that saw one of their members, Francesco Beretta, sentenced to four years of military service. In 1698, the Berettas were the second largest barrel producer among 33 in Gardone, making 2,883 barrels, mostly for long arms.
    The Venetian senate sporadically banned the export of gun barrels throughout the 16th and 17th centuries. When it was allowed, high duties slowed sales. The artisans involved in the highly specialized business of making gun barrels were vulnerable to these down-turns. During these times, the Republic of Venice went to great lengths to prevent the export of technology.'

    tac