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Want to learn.

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by mookmanjdj, Dec 4, 2011.

  1. mookmanjdj

    mookmanjdj Oregon Coast Member

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    What is the best way to go about learning about gunsmithing? I do well with how to books, any suggestions?
     
  2. Nwcid

    Nwcid Yakima and N of Spokane Well-Known Member

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    Well the obvious best answer is to go to a gunsmithing school. I assume that is not going to be an option for you. I know you say you do well with books but this is a real hands on skill set.

    I guess it depends on the level of smith you want to be. Are you just trying to fix up old guns and build "kit guns" like AR's and 1911's? If that is the case then pick up old guns that you find cheep and practice on them. I have learned most of my stuff by needing/wanted to fix/change something and just trying and seeing what works. Of course I will also look up and read stuff about it online. Most of this stuff can be done with basic tools most guys have (or should have) around the house and a few inexpensive specialty tool.

    If you want to get into major smithing such as actually building things from scratch it is going to take much more practice and $$$ tools/machines. I would love to get into some of this but at this point I am not willing to throw down the money for a lathe/mill machine nor do I have the skills yet to run one.
     
    mookmanjdj and (deleted member) like this.
  3. mookmanjdj

    mookmanjdj Oregon Coast Member

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    That sounds like a good place to start. I have 30 years of fabricating and machining skills so I know what you mean by hands on. I don't think at this point I can go back to school but I love to tinker and discover. Fixing up some cheap or damaged guns sounds like a great idea. Thanks for taking the time to respond, I really appreciate your time.
     
  4. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like we have similar backgrounds and I have been buying up junk or broken guns for a while now and practicing with them. I am at a a point where I am doing some 'lite' work for friends and people I meet at work such as cleanings, throating and polishing and making small obsolete parts. I have discussed the AGI direction with a couple gunsmiths and they too support it but only because, like you, I have a lot of experience in related fields and that experience will allow us to grasp the concepts of 'correspondence' learning as well as the course material. I am also pretty well fixed for tools and equipment but I do want another TIG welder and a set of dedicated gun screwdrivers are next on my list!
     
    mookmanjdj and (deleted member) like this.
  5. mookmanjdj

    mookmanjdj Oregon Coast Member

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    I have checked out AGI's website and it looks right up my alley. Has anyone else used their products? I would appreciate any other experiences or input with this company. Thanks to all who suggested it.
     
  6. mookmanjdj

    mookmanjdj Oregon Coast Member

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    I have purchased a few DVD's from AGI and really like them. Even if you just want to learn more about a particular weapon they are a great tool. Highly recommended. I am looking forward to getting more as I learn more.