Update: Walked off the job today

Messages
1,721
Reactions
2,154
Original post: Isn't giving a days notice, still giving notice?

Or is it generally not counted unless you give 2 weeks notice?

Update: this morning I gave notice that today was going to be my last day. Word spread pretty quickly. CEO wanted to chat to try to stop me, and I essentially told him I've said all I have to say. My boss (Vice President) emailed me asking if I want to talk before end of day.

I didn't respond. He came out of the CEO's office later that day and stopped by my cube and asked if I wanted to talk. I told him I was good. This was in front of all my colleauges, who applauded me. All day I received emails and IM's about how they (company management) have no idea how adversely this is going to affect them. They underestimate how easy it will be to replace me and my skill set. My colleagues stopped by and emailed in droves with compliments, noting they know that I've been carrying the workload for others in the company and the piss poor management I have to deal with.

I gave honest answers in my exit interview with the HR director. I rated my boss (the VP) very poorly. I told her that although I'm sure I'm not elligible for rehire for not giving more notice, I have no intention of ever returning. With my resume, and skillsets, I have my pick of plenty of other opportunities and wouldn't waste anymore of my time working for a company with such poor management and hopelessly lost management.

Note: Yes, I have another job lined up. I had four other offers 3 of which are for more money, and better benefits, commute, etc. Taking some time between jobs.
 
Messages
2,457
Reactions
1,898
You have to ask yourself these questions "Will you need a recommendation from this job further down the road? Will they be listed on future resumes?" If the answers are yes, I'd try to leave on the best possible terms I could. Two weeks is traditional, but not required. I don't want to screw anyone over, but if it was a job I wasn't going to reference and my new job needed me tomorrow, I'd have to go with the new job. I've got to look out for me.
 
OP
B
Messages
1,721
Reactions
2,154
Not a contractor. Referencing them on my resume, of course they will be there. They will give the usual yes he worked here, his title was, and MAYBE whether I'm elligible for rehire.

I worked there for 2 + years, and am firing them due to their incompetence. I've done this before at a previous employer and it worked out just fine.

I'm more curious if it technically counts as "notice" if you just give a day.
 
Messages
23
Reactions
2
I agree with the previous poster. You can give as much or as little notice as you want. However, if you want a good reference, it's a good idea to work with your employer to figure out a reasonable timeframe so you don't burn the bridge. Of course, what's appropriate really depends what kind of work you do. Some employers may not want you to stick around, others may ask for more time so you can train a replacement or whatever.
 
Messages
312
Reactions
147
I will say years ago 2 weeks notice was common, and you worked that 2 weeks. Now more times then not if you line up another job with plans to start in two weeks and give 2 weeks notice you will be told to leave immediately and possibly be escorted from the building by security on the spot.

Best case scenario is they make you leave as soon as they can get someone/anyone to cover your shift.

Businesses do this these days not to be mean or vindictive to you, its for their security. The dont want the people pissing off their customers, stealing from the company, or screwing up the books before you leave. Same deal if they plan to fire you on Friday, if you find out early, you will be fired the minute they know you know.

If you work for a company that gives employees 2 weeks notice of lay offs or severance pay if fired, fine give notice, but now days most companies give nothing and i would give them nothing in return.


It didnt use to be this way but it is now.

With that give notice at your own risk,

If you can start the new job early and they will wait the 2 weeks if needed, fine give notice.
If you cant start the new job before a certain date or they need you to start now, dont give any notice.

I say look out for your self and your bills these days, because i would guess 95% of businesses will be looking after theirs and you want make is a day after giving notice let alone 2 weeks..
 

Mark W.

Messages
7,724
Reactions
10,527
Most large companies won't do anything but verify dates of employment. My wife is the bookkeeper for an Albertsons store they won't even verify dates of emp in house they refer the caller to a web site where the only info is the past emps dates of emp. Of course this would vary from employer to employer. But most larger outfits want nothing to do with references for past emps its a legal nightmare.
 
Messages
629
Reactions
296
For me it depends on how I was treated by the employer. If they treated me well and Im just leaving for a better deal, Id give notice. If they were a bad employer and I could afford to give notice- Id take the high road and give notice, knowing if its the other way around Id get summarily dismissed. If the company has taken an active roll in ruining my life and every day going to work is the worst day of my life, Id tell them to get bent and leave
 
OP
B
Messages
1,721
Reactions
2,154
What does giving 2 weeks notice have to do with being a dick? I don't work as a barista or some retail gig.

My company generally treats the employees like crap. My boss is a huge dick, and I have no intent to ever return. I've never gone back to any employer I've left, because generally there is a reason I left that employer...
 
Messages
8
Reactions
7
It is common courtesy to give an employer two weeks notice. However, if you have another job to go to then you can give as much or little notice as you wish. Don't burn any bridges if you want to get a letter of recommendation.

An employer doesn't need to give you any notice, they can just let you go.

Hope that this helps!
 
Messages
89
Reactions
35
It depends on the work IMO. My rule of thumb has always been give 2 weeks notice and if your new employer has a problem with you giving that courtesy to your former employer then they may not be a company you want to work for. That being said, I've only worked for 2 companies in my adult life so take that for what it's worth.
 
if it is a lousy company that treats its employees poorly and your immediate boss is a dick then just quit.
Also, how do they dismiss people? Where I am at they have fired people on the spot and had security escort them out the door. The fired employee did not even have the chance to get his stuff of his desk. Simply was told that it will be boxed up and he can pick it up next day or whatever.
If that is the sort of treatment you can expect, then just quit on the spot.
Loyalty goes both ways
 
Messages
272
Reactions
66
Depends on how small your field is, if I gave one day I wouldn't ever get another job in my field, word of mouth is a powerful thing. 2 weeks at a minimum if I didn't like the job. My last job I left I gave 6 weeks.
 
Messages
538
Reactions
264
I've quit every job I ever had(some 2 or 3 times), and I always have given two weeks notice. Out of 8 different employers, all but one had me work the last two weeks to assist with the transition.

I always had another, better job lined up before giving notice...hence the 2 or 3 time deal...early in my career I worked for small local outfits where they paid the bare minimum to keep you around..and I would have to redefine the bare minimum for them.

I think giving two weeks is the stand up thing to do, and I've seen a lot of guys get burned down the road by leaving a job abruptly.

It's a small world, and you can lose everything, but you'll always keep your reputation.
 
Depends on the companies reputation, how much your boss gets around the block, etc. etc. My former job was horrible. I had a supervisor that I did over half of his job for him (based on the company documented job-description for his title), handled 30% more clients than my fellow co-workers, and was treated like crap when I brought it up after 4 years of doing it. I was with the company for a total of 7 years too, but when I gave my two weeks notice I heard my boss on the phone with HR saying he just wanted to fire me and they told him that he couldn't do that, and he then called a meeting of all my co-workers (exempting me) and told them to no longer talk to me. After reporting his behavior about my notice to HR they gave me my last week of notice paid and told me not to come back. That day the boss of my boss got in my face about me going to HR over my supervisor's temperament (apparently my pay for that week was coming out of his bonus).

In hindsight, I wish I would have just walked out. It was an abusive place, and that supervisor recently was laid off after being written up for "violent" type behavior that when I reported initially was swept under the rug. I say follow the golden rule, treat them as they have treated others.
 
Messages
1,117
Reactions
556
How much notice do they give you when they need to cut down the workforce? They hand you an envelope.

Agree tho, give them the same amount of respect that they gave you.

In Oregon it's against the law for a former employer to give a bad reference (freakin crazy) so you can give em the finger and just bail if you want. I'm sure there are ways to say things though, 'He showed up most of the time' 'He was often sober' etc.
 

UPCOMING EVENTS

Free Firearms Safety Course Webinar (I-1639 Compliant)
Virtual Webinar (Zoom). Registration Link in the course description.
Washington, USA
Rimfire Challenge Feb 13th @ DRRC
Douglas Ridge Rifle Club
27787 OR-224, Eagle Creek, OR 97022, USA
Albany Rifle & Pistol Club (ARPC) Gun Show
Linn County Expo Center
3700 Knox Butte Rd E, Albany, OR 97322, USA
Rimfire Challenge May 8th @ DRRC
Douglas Ridge Rifle Club
27787 OR-224, Eagle Creek, OR 97022, USA

LATEST RESOURCE REVIEWS

  • Paul A Martin Historical Guns
    5.00 star(s)
    Great shop, selection and atmosphere
    One of the better firearm shop experiences I’ve had, Paul is very patient and helpful. Definitely going to be a repeat customer even though it’s...
  • Adaptive Firing Solutions
    5.00 star(s)
    Great Service! A+
    Steve is a very nice guy and very easy to work with. I've done business with him a few times and will continue to.
  • Adaptive Firing Solutions
    5.00 star(s)
    Great guy!
    Steve is a great guy to deal with!
  • HighLine Firearms
    5.00 star(s)
    Nice Home Shop
    Had what I wanted at a good price. Messaged me when in stock.
  • Adaptive Firing Solutions
    5.00 star(s)
    Excellent Service
    Steve is an excellent guy to deal with. After looking at some Form 4 items at another dealer who didnt seem interested in my money, i emailed...
Top Bottom