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The Turn in your neighbor program ??

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by U201491, Jan 7, 2015.

  1. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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    How soon till the turn in your parents program begins in the schools or has that already begun ?
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    CORNELIUS POLICE DEPARTMENT LAUNCHES "SEE SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING"


    News Release from Washington Co. Sheriff's Office
    Posted on FlashAlert: January 7th, 2015 2:15 PM
    January 7, 2015 - The Cornelius Police Department launches a proactive educational program encouraging citizens to report behaviors and activities that appear to be signs of criminal activity. "See Something, Say Something".

    Do you know when to call the police for help? Depending on the situation, do you know there are two different numbers to call to reach the police? For many people, there are obvious occasions to dial 911 to call the police for help (immediate threat of harm, emergency, car accidents), but what about the times when you just aren't sure?

    Cornelius Chief of Police, Gene Moss, wants to better educate citizens on when to call for police help, and to encourage them to call even if they aren't sure. While working in the City of Cornelius, Chief Moss has worked to assess what is needed and how we can better serve the community of Cornelius, and ultimately the entire population of Washington County.

    Chief Moss supports the opportunity to build relationships, improve communication, and educate the community on the importance of reporting neighborhood livability issues and nuisances. One of the primary goals of this new educational program is to encourage the community to reach out to police for help and to continue to show the level of service provided by Sheriff's Deputies serving the City of Cornelius. The community is asked to call non-emergency dispatch at 503-629-0111 to report graffiti, property damage, and any incidents that can cause community degradation.

    The "See Something, Say Something" program will provide quarterly educational messages on public safety, crime prevention strategies, improving communication, and continuing to grow relationships with our community partners.

    As citizens communicate more regularly the needs and events occurring in their community; we can begin to recognize trends, assess changes, and maintain exceptional services levels to all areas. The Cornelius Police Department wants the citizens we serve to know we consider "no call too small" and are eager to hear what is happening in your neighborhood.
     
  2. gunnails

    gunnails Hillsboro Active Member

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    This all sounds good to me.
     
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  3. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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    Its a mental conditioning plan that will backfire on the people eventually.
    They began the same thing in Germany in the 1930's

    Just more boil the frog programming in the disguise of safety.
    Always in the disguise of safety or for the children.
    They have you by the shorthairs with that thinking and you can't even see it.
    Ahh well ......too damned old anymore to worry about it..........enjoy the new
    upcoming Stalingrad of America. When are they setting up the camps ?
    :s0149::s0124:
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2015
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  4. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

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    I like the idea.

    I want the neighbors to know what I do. Then they can be conditioned to it and I can slowly elevate what I do and they won't notice.

    Not really. Within reason it's a good idea to be responsible for your neighborhood and the like. I still write down license plates of speeders and watch who enters and who exits at what time of day/night.
     
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  5. gunnails

    gunnails Hillsboro Active Member

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    =================================

    Oh Jeez, really, Nazi Germany?

    I believe we all have a role in policing our communities, and interacting with the police and making them aware of concerns is part of that.
     
  6. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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    The difference is that good people already do that, and there is no need for a government program to do same. Then it becomes a tool for them and against the people like everything else they do.
    KNOW THE DIFFERENCE. They do this on the East coast too, in places like Maryland, New Jersey, etc......
    It is for all intent a snitch and spy on your neighbor program in the beginning stages. It will breed mistrust and
    eventual doom for any neighbor to neighbor interactions that would have been good. Instead they will all wonder what their neighbor will be turning them in for and turn everyone into cheap actors in a fearful unreal world. This kind of thing is where it all starts and undermines communities. Only Socialists, Marxists and communists embrace this kind of organized and sponsored government life intrusion.

    .
     
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  7. LoneStar

    LoneStar WA Active Member

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    Are citizens supposed to turn in "thought criminals"?
     
  8. gunnails

    gunnails Hillsboro Active Member

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    ====================================

    I agree with the bolded part, the rest is overstated conjecture. IMHO
    Not sure when the last time you were in Corneilius, but it has changed a lot in the last 30 years. The police there can use all the community support and communication they can get. There is a large part of the community that is non US born and traditionally are afraid of contacting the police with crime concerns, and just afraid of the police in general.
     
  9. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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    That will be next, and in fact there are areas that already are considering this "Pre Crime" BS.

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=11&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CFIQFjAK&url=http://www.cnet.com/news/homeland-security-moves-forward-with-pre-crime-detection/&ei=376tVKW5HZCtoQTEm4LgCA&usg=AFQjCNGSkEv1c-n1W_x2EST-mTCeG6oBEg&bvm=bv.83339334,d.cGU

    https://privacysos.org/precrime

    and many stories and reports on this are out there, so beware.

    http://reason.com/blog/2014/08/05/eric-holder-warns-about-americas-disturb

    States such as Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Missouri have developed programs that attempt to offer risk-assessments of offenders. Those risk assessments, which are based on a variety of factors including age, education level, and neighborhood of residence as well as past criminality, are meant to guide judges in sentencing. The explicit goal is to reduce future instances of criminality, which means that instead of sentencing people for crime already committed, sentences based on these risk assessments are instead sentencing people for crimes that they, or people like them, might commit.


    Minority Report was not just a movie.

    .
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2015
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  10. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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    :s0126:


    But in response...
    That is an issue that could be straightened out by people being made to legally enter the country and taking citizenship classes like our grandparents and great grandparents did. That culture belongs where it came from , not imported and mollycoddled here. American citizens, real ones, will pay the price for this kind of bullpucky. I do know What Cornelius has become and the demographics there, as I had relatives that had to move from there because of the criminal elements that do live there now.

    This isn't an illegal or legal issue it is a conditioning and brainwashing issue and it affects everyone in the State and the Nation because of where it is heading.
    The ethnic makeup of Cornelius is not what this thread is about. But that shows just one more reason why the borders need to be secured and people need to enter this country properly and within the law.
    Part of that entry process is learning the US Constitution and the legal process among other things and that
    fear issue goes by the wayside.

    I really prefer this was not an immigration/illegal discussion.
    It is about what the government is enacting in incremental pieces all over the nation.

    .
     
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  11. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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    But you don't continually dial 911 and report when your neighbor uses an extra piece of TP do you...
    there is a difference between that and what they are promoting.
     
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  12. LoneStar

    LoneStar WA Active Member

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    Taku,
    Those articles are disturbing. In much of Europe & Canada one can go to prison for "thought" crimes. In Europe if you criticize the government for importing Muslims into your country (or just criticize Muslims) you can go to prison. If you question the Holocaust you can go to prison.

    If you want a vision of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face - forever.
    ~George Orwell
     
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  13. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, just too many people don't know, or they do not want anyone else to know. Agenda speaks for itself there.
    When you look at the movies that have been put out for the past 50+ years, and then look at what society has done and what government has done the parallels in what were like sci-fi are becoming true to life. The Minority Report was just too well done and I saw this coming, in modified forms for quite some time. The folks that want your blinders to remain intact, will jump on this I am sure. Will be interesting to see that LOL. Can you predict who they will be ? :D
    If not this will have done its job <eg>
    .
     
  14. albin25

    albin25 Lewiston Idaho Well-Known Member

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    Neighbors watching out for and helping neighbors....such a simple concept in the hands of the people. Easy for good people to live by and live with.
    But impossible for governments to codify as law and policy, to do so invites over-reach and the worst forms of tyranny ever seen by man.
     
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  15. timac

    timac Loading Magazines! Well-Known Member

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    Before you become a government snitch. Read how these government programs have worked in the past and will work today and in the future.



    Robert Gellately

    Earl Ray Beck Professor, Department of History

    "Never forget!"

    Few disagree with keeping the memory of the Holocaust alive.

    But the question of what to remember is still in debate, and one of the most respected and persuasive voices belongs to Robert Gellately, the Earl Ray Beck Professor of History, whose work challenges the central notions of the role played by "ordinary" German citizens in the rule of the Gestapo (secret state police).


    His research began with a chance discovery.

    Gellately had already published a book on German anti-semitism before the First World War and was doing research in a German archive when a librarian alerted him to a collection of Gestapo files—19,000 of them—that Nazi officers had not had to time to burn before the Allies arrived.

    "I started to read these files about all the victims in just one region of Germany that the Gestapo had processed," Gellately says. "It would have taken a large force of secret police to collect information on so many people. I needed to know just how many secret police there really were. So I asked an elderly gentleman who would've lived through those times, and he replied, 'They were everywhere!'"

    That was the prevailing myth.

    "But I had evidence right there in my hands that supported a different story," Gellately explains. "There were relatively few secret police, and most were just processing the information coming in. I had found a shocking fact. It wasn't the secret police who were doing this wide-scale surveillance and hiding on every street corner. It was the ordinary German people who were informing on their neighbors."

    This chance experience in an archive grew into his second book, The Gestapo and German Society: Enforcing Racial Policy 1933-45 (Oxford University Press, 1990). Gellately had begun his lifetime project: writing books as a way of righting inaccuracies about one of the most significant events in human history.

    As he was uncovering who was acting as the Gestapo's unsolicited agents, he also began to discern what motivated neighbor to inform on neighbor. The surviving myth told the story of informers who were motivated either by a commitment to the Third Reich or by a fear of authority.

    But the motives Gellately found were banal—greed, jealousy, and petty differences.

    He found cases of partners in business turning in associates to gain full ownership; jealous boyfriends informing on rival suitors; neighbors betraying entire families who chronically left shared bathrooms unclean or who occupied desirable apartments.

    And then there were those who informed because for the first time in their lives someone in authority would listen to them and value what they said.

    Did informants know the consequences of their accusations? Did they know that the accused were frequently freighted to concentration camps? Tortured? Killed?

    "If somebody tells you that they lived in Germany during the Holocaust and didn't know about concentration camps, they are self-delusional, at best," Gellately says.

    Not only were the camps not a secret, Gellately's research revealed, but the Third Reich made them a part of most Germans' daily life.

    "I tested the assumption that 'Germans didn't know about the camps' by looking at their daily newspapers. This research project checked a small sample of newspapers, collecting only those articles with literal references in the headlines to 'concentration camps' and other related terms," he explains. "Even within that limited sample we found enough articles to fill a large carton."

    This revelation became a focus of his third book, Backing Hitler: Consent and Coercion in Nazi Germany, 1933-1944 (Oxford University Press, 2001) and set off a controversy that became the focus of an episode on the popular German television program Panorama (the German equivalent of 60 Minutes), for which Gellately was interviewed at length.

    A show produced by the BBC rendered the controversy by interviewing people who had informed.

    "One woman who was interviewed by the BBC typifies how Germans revised their own personal histories," explains Gellately. "When she was presented with a Gestapo document she had signed that denounced a Jewish woman, she admitted the signature was authentic—was hers. She then said, 'But that's not me.'"

    Sorting out this tangle of history and rendering it in exposition engaging to both the academic and non-academic readers have prompted reviews in most major newspapers and magazines, from Newsweek to The New York Times. This review in The Washington Post (July 29, 2001) typifies the critical reception for Gellately's work:

    Books on the Holocaust…number in the tens of thousands. Of that vast library, a handful of texts should be deemed essential reading for any serious student of the bloody and pathetic 20th century. Robert Gellately's Backing Hitler is among them.

    Backing Hitler also challenges conventional views on the nature of modern dictatorships. Perhaps as a way for us to believe that "it couldn't happen here," we have viewed the Holocaust as an atrocity that was the work of a handful of evil men. Gellately, however, presents persuasive evidence that Hitler and the Third Reich were able to build a consensus for their policies.

    "They began with small violations of the rights of Jews and other minorities, and then ratcheted up their racism and persecution only when they saw implied consent from the German people." Gellately says. "Many Germans disapproved of Hitler's fascism and brutality, at first. But after the long economic depression following the First World War, the German people allowed the thriving economy and return to law and order under Hitler to mute their concerns. People had jobs and the streets were safe. Hitler was managing a fine balance of consent and coercion."

    Gellately has recently published a set of original documents dealing with the 1945-46 Nuremberg trials of war criminals in The Nuremberg Interviews: Profiles of the Leading Nazis, by the Prison Psychiatrist to the Nuremberg Trials (Alfred A. Knopf, 2004). This volume is scheduled to be translated into fourteen languages.

    Gellately's work, many would argue, should be translated into every nation's language, for his project does more than just apply rigorous scholarship to demystify this period of history. It is a study of the modern human being, what we have done and how we came to do it—and how in understanding our vulnerabilities, we might survive them.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2015
  16. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I have way more important things to worry about than this crap.
     
  17. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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    So go worry about other things then
    We don't need to know that.
    You don't need permission do you ?
    Bye.
     
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  18. timac

    timac Loading Magazines! Well-Known Member

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    Turning Americans into Snitches for the Police State: ‘See Something, Say Something’ and Community Policing
    Written by John W. Whitehead
    Monday September 22, 2014 printer.png
    see-say_240x231.jpg

    “There were relatively few secret police, and most were just processing the information coming in. I had found a shocking fact. It wasn’t the secret police who were doing this wide-scale surveillance and hiding on every street corner. It was the ordinary German people who were informing on their neighbors.”—Professor Robert Gellately If you see something suspicious, says the Department of Homeland Security, say something about it to the police, call it in to a government hotline, or report it using a convenient app on your smart phone.

    (If you’re a whistleblower wanting to snitch on government wrongdoing, however, forget about it—the government doesn’t take kindly to having its dirty deeds publicized and, God forbid, being made to account for them.)

    For more than a decade now, the DHS has plastered its “See Something, Say Something” campaign on the walls of metro stations, on billboards, on coffee cup sleeves, at the Super Bowl, even on television monitors in the Statue of Liberty. Now colleges, universities and even football teams and sporting arenas are lining up for grants to participate in the program.

    This DHS slogan is nothing more than the government’s way of indoctrinating “we the people” into the mindset that we’re an extension of the government and, as such, have a patriotic duty to be suspicious of, spy on, and turn in our fellow citizens.

    This is what is commonly referred to as community policing. Yet while community policing and federal programs such as “See Something, Say Something” are sold to the public as patriotic attempts to be on guard against those who would harm us, they are little more than totalitarian tactics dressed up and repackaged for a more modern audience as well-intentioned appeals to law and order and security.

    The police state could not ask for a better citizenry than one that carries out its own policing.

    After all, the police can’t be everywhere. So how do you police a nation when your population outnumbers your army of soldiers? How do you carry out surveillance on a nation when there aren’t enough cameras, let alone viewers, to monitor every square inch of the country 24/7? How do you not only track but analyze the transactions, interactions and movements of every person within the United States?

    The answer is simpler than it seems: You persuade the citizenry to be your eyes and ears. You hype them up on color-coded “Terror alerts,” keep them in the dark about the distinctions between actual threats and staged “training” drills so that all crises seem real, desensitize them to the sight of militarized police walking their streets, acclimatize them to being surveilled “for their own good,” and then indoctrinate them into thinking that they are the only ones who can save the nation from another 9/11.

    As historian Robert Gellately points out, a Nazi order requires at least some willing collaborators to succeed. In other words, this is how you turn a people into extensions of the omniscient, omnipotent, omnipresent police state, and in the process turn a citizenry against each other.

    It’s a brilliant ploy, with the added bonus that while the citizenry remains focused on and distrustful of each other and shadowy forces from outside the country, they’re incapable of focusing on more definable threats that fall closer to home—namely, the government and its cabal of Constitution-destroying agencies and corporate partners.

    Community policing did not come about as a feel-good, empowering response to individuals trying to “take back” their communities from crime syndicates and drug lords. Rather, “Community-Oriented Policing” or COPs (short for Community Partnerships, Organizational Transformation, and Problem Solving) is a Department of Justice program designed to foster partnerships between police agencies and members of the community. (Remember, this is the same Justice Department which, in conjunction with the DHS, has been providing funding and equipping local police agencies across the country with surveillance devices and military gear. These same local police have been carrying out upwards of 80,000 SWAT team raids a year on individuals, some of whom are guilty of nothing more than growing tomatoes, and breeding orchids without the proper paperwork.)

    Mind you, this is a far cry from community engagement, which is what I grew up with as a kid. Then as now, there were always neighbors watching what you bought, what you said, what you did, who you did it with, etc. My own mother proudly peered out our living room window with a pair of military-issue binoculars to keep an eye on the goings on in the neighborhood. The difference was that if there was a problem, it was dealt with as a community. When my neighbor spied me running through his flower garden, he didn’t call the cops—he called my mother. When I sassed the manager of the general store, he didn’t turn me in to the cops—he reported it to my mother. Likewise, when my next-door neighbor (who happened to be the police chief) caught me in the act of egging cars one Halloween, he didn’t haul me down to the precinct—“I’m taking you to a far worse place,” he said, “your Dad.”

    So, if there’s nothing wrong with community engagement, if the police can’t be everywhere at once, if surveillance cameras do little to actually prevent crime, and if we need to “take back our communities” from the crime syndicates and drug lords, then what’s wrong with community policing and “See Something, Say Something”?

    What’s wrong is that these programs are not, in fact, making America any safer. Instead, they’re turning us into a legalistic, intolerant, squealing, bystander nation content to report a so-called violation to the cops and then turn a blind eye to the ensuing tragedies.

    Apart from the sheer idiocy of arresting people for such harmless “crimes” as raising pet chickens, letting their kids walk to the park alone, peeling the bark off a tree, holding prayer meetings in their backyard and living off the grid, there’s also the unfortunate fact that once the police are called in, with their ramped up protocols, battlefield mindset, militarized weapons, uniforms and equipment, and war zone tactics, it’s a process that is near impossible to turn back and one that too often ends in tragedy for all those involved.

    For instance, when a neighbor repeatedly called the police to report that 5-year-old Phoenix Turnbull was keeping a pet red hen (nickname: Carson Petey) in violation of an Atwater, Minnesota, city ordinance against backyard chickens, the police chief got involved. In an effort to appease the complaining neighbor and “protect a nearby elementary school from a chicken on the loose,” the police chief walked onto the Turnbull’s property, decapitated the hen with a shovel, deposited the severed head on the family’s front stoop, and left a neighborhood child to report the news that “the cops killed your chicken!”

    Now things could have been worse. The police chief could have opted to do a SWAT-team style raid on the Turnbulls’ chicken coop, as other police departments have taken to raiding goat cheese farmers, etc. The Turnbulls could also have been made to serve jail time or pay a hefty fine for violating an established ordinance. In fact, this happens routinely to individuals who grow vegetable gardens and install solar panels in violation of city ordinances.

    At a minimum, the Atwater city council needs to revisit its ban on backyard chickens, especially at a time when increasing numbers of Americans are attempting, for economic or health reasons, to grow or raise their own organic food, and the police chief needs to scale back on his aggression towards our feathered friends. But what about the complaining neighbor?

    It’s fine to be shocked by the convergence of militarized police in Ferguson, Mo., it’s appropriate to be outraged by the SWAT team raid that left a Georgia toddler in the ICU, and it’s fitting to take umbrage with the inane laws that result in parents being arrested for leaving their 10-year-old kids in air conditioned cars while they run into a store, but where’s the indignation over the police state’s partners-in crime—the neighbors, the clerks, the utility workers—who turn in their fellow citizens for little more than having unsightly lawns and voicing controversial ideas?

    In much the same way the old African proverb “it takes a village to raise a child” was used to make the case for an all-encompassing government program of social welfare, the DHS and the DOJ are attempting to make the case that it takes a nation to catch a terrorist.

    To this end, the Justice Department identifies five distinct “partners” in the community policing scheme: law enforcement and other government agencies, community members and groups, nonprofits, churches and service providers, private businesses and the media.

    Together, these groups are supposed to “identify” community concerns, “engage” the community in achieving specific goals, serve as “powerful” partners with the government, and add their “considerable resources” to the government’s already massive arsenal of technology and intelligence. The mainstream media’s role, long recognized as being a mouthpiece for the government, is formally recognized as “publicizing” services from government or community agencies or new laws or codes that will be enforced, as well as shaping public perceptions of the police, crime problems, and fear of crime.

    Amazingly, the Justice Department guidelines sound as if they were taken from a Nazi guide on how to rule a nation. “Germans not only watched out for ‘crimes’ and other deviations” of fellow German citizens, Gellately writes, “but they watched each other.”

    Should you find yourself suddenly unnerved at the prospect of being spied on by your neighbors, your actions scrutinized, your statements dissected, and your motives second-guessed, not to worry: as I point out in my book A Government of Wolves, this is par for the course in the American police state.
     
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  19. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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    And in Germany they gave Jews a title and a "badge" and made snitches out of them against their families and relatives and neighbors, and eventually they paid the price themselves when they were used up.
    Corrupt Governments sucker anyone and everyone they can use, ie USE. Starts small and ends up like the Gulags in the USSR or places like Auschwitz, Treblinka, Birkenau etc. Instead and for our future, replace Jew with Patriot.
     
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  20. Redcap

    Redcap Lewis County, WA Well-Known Member

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    Snitches get stitches or end up in ditches.
     
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