The .44 Magmatic?

So, I've been thinking about if there is ever an era in which I'm not so slammed for time, getting into bowling pin shooting. In the short term, I'll likely be putting up such a setup on the home range, but that is another topic. On the subject, I've been reading a 1982 vintage book by Massad Ayoob entitled Hit the White Part. I'm about a fourth of a way through it and it isn't bad, though the early-80s fashion is unintentionally hilarious. The book mentioned something called the .44 Magmatic and, since I'm a big fan of weird and/or old guns, I googled it and found a picture:

146612232.png
It appears to be a custom, gas-operated, six (or five, depending on the source) + one shot, auto in .44 Magnum. Out of curiosity, anyone know what became of these? Anyone shot one? Were just a few made or was it more common? I strongly suspect the former. Granted, there is nothing it could do that, say, a Desert Eagle or LAR Grizzly couldn't do just as well. Still, it is kind of interesting.

Thanks!
 
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It doesnt seem to be an Automag variant; I see a few articles talking about Jon Power's Magmatics prototypes, apparently up to 6 were made in the 70s but I do not know if any are still firing or surviving pieces anywhere. It is indeed gas operated, buffered, and semi automatic, 7 shot magazines, with 8th in the chamber.
 

EPS

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I think it's fake news someone photo shop it that's 1911 side with a AR BOLT Luger bottom and has a S/W barrel looks a model 29 or a Dan Wesson lol
 

EPS

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I don't know if we had more pictures maybe but something don't look right I SMELL A RAT LOL
 

jbett98

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Here's an article by Dave Bradshaw who is reminiscing about Jon Powers creation on WWW.SINGLEACTIONS.COM

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwidzKz6ga_SAhXFzlQKHazlAF0QFggsMAM&url=http://singleactions.proboards.com/thread/10020/44-magmatic&usg=AFQjCNFrOWoKcML2PRP3YKOmF5Bgpe2pUA

Post by bradshaw on Feb 12, 2013 at 8:05pm
Jon Powers and I teamed up at one of Richard Davis' Second Chance bowling pin matches. Powers brought along a Magmatic, and I had one of two prototypes in the USA of the Beretta 9mm Luger that would soon replace the Browning/Colt 1911. Beretta loaned me the prototype to take to Second Chance.

The other prototype was at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida (site of the joint services procurement tests). Operative word "was," as this pistol also showed up at the Second Chance shoot. Up at the Second Chance match in Michigan, Powers traded use of his Magmatic for various submachine guns and beaucoup ammunition.

I found the Beretta to be much sought after by cops and military, all of whom wanted to try the pistol and be able to tell everyone back home what they'd shot. As Powers was trading his Magmatic for guns and ammunition, I traded use of the prototype Beretta for submachine guns, but mostly thousands of rounds----ammo no doubt looted from armories. Image of mass mayhem as Chief of Police screams, "Where's the ammo?"

A cop with his department's Thompson M1921 falls in love with the .44 Magmatic; he loans Powers the chopper. In exchange, Jon Powers takes the THOMPSON SUBMACHINE GUN. The CHICAGO PIANO is an aesthetic and performance favorite of Powers. And you can see why: the Thompson exudes machine tool brilliance, as do the guns crafted by Jon Powers. This Model 1921 Thompson is restamped "1928" and carries the heavier M-1928 bolt, reducing the rate of fire from 800+ rpm to 500 rpm. Double pistol grips, ventilating rib barrel with Cutts Compensator, interchangeable stick magazines and 50-rd drum. Powers and I soon discover the 50-round drum on full blast runs dry in 4-seconds.

Jon Powers wastes no time putting the Thompson to work. The bowling pins are shot against the clock from 25 feet. Scantily clad----that is, wholesome----high school girls holding stop watches time each individual shooter, or team. Soft body armor inventor Richard Davis sits like a Kevlar Emperor in lifeguard chair and fires a revolver in the air to start each relay. The girl in an economy of cloth hits the stop button as your last pin thumps the ground. The pins are lined up on the front edge of a steel topped table, and must be pushed three feet to fall off the table. Pins often spin on the table, waiting on more lead before flying off to kiss the dirt.

For the 4-man team event, Powers and I are joined by a drug cop fresh from tangling with smugglers in Florida, and by firearms instructor/writer/marksman Massod Ayoob. Powers plays Chicago Piano, Florida cop on long magazine 12 gauge 870, Massod Ayoob on long magazine Remington 1100 automatic shotgun. And me with handgun----make that four handguns----a Jim Clark Colt 1911 borrowed from Colt representative Lew Sharpe; another borrowed Colt 1911 thrust in my belt; my Bo-Mar ribbed 5" Model 29 .44 Mag worked over by Ron Power and Mag-na-Port, with French walnut grips by knifemaker Clay Gault; and, last, my M-29 4" seen recently on this forum.

During one string of 40 pins----we were having too much fun----Powers empties the Chicago Piano, splattering pins, the drug agent shucks out a torrent of buckshot from his 870, Massod Ayoob empties his drainpipe-magazine Rem 1100. And your humble writer blasts 8-rounds apiece from two Colt 1911's----shooting the .45's one-at-a-time, naturally, followed by six .44's from the 5-inch 29. the boys reload feverishly as one orphan pin spins on the the table. Two .45's lay at this shooter's feet, the 5" 29 which swingss by lanyard from his neck as the M29 4-inch is drawn; its first shot spins the spinning pin off the table. Elapsed time 9 seconds, laughter and all.

A few beers one night in "town"----a street with a saloon. Drive back to hayfield camp site, pitched full of contestants tents. Powers sits crosslegged in his tent, cleaning the beautiful Thompson. Powers reassembles the chopper, studying it closely. Winds the magazine spring of the 50-round drum, loads in a box of GI ball, fastens cover.

Roar of two motorcycles, throttling down as they turn onto our hayfield campground. Tell by the sound it's the two LEO been with at the bar. Bikes rumble over a tent. Shouting inside the canvas.

BR-R-RAP... BR-R-R-R-A-A-APP----burst of M16. People in underwear, probably naked, firing at the stars. Jon Powers leaps out tent, muzzle erect, sliding drum into receiver. Wipes actuator. DUDDA DUDDA DUDDA----sky stitched full of bullet holes----DUDDA DUDDA... BA-BOOM BA-BOOM of shotguns... KA-POW POW POW of pistols... Smoke drifts across flashlight beams. The firing dies down. A murmur of satisfaction sweeps the tents. Hundreds of grinning faces go to sleep.

David Bradshaw
 

EPS

Messages
13,349
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26,057
Here's an article by Dave Bradshaw who is reminiscing about Jon Powers creation on WWW.SINGLEACTIONS.COM

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwidzKz6ga_SAhXFzlQKHazlAF0QFggsMAM&url=http://singleactions.proboards.com/thread/10020/44-magmatic&usg=AFQjCNFrOWoKcML2PRP3YKOmF5Bgpe2pUA

Post by bradshaw on Feb 12, 2013 at 8:05pm
Jon Powers and I teamed up at one of Richard Davis' Second Chance bowling pin matches. Powers brought along a Magmatic, and I had one of two prototypes in the USA of the Beretta 9mm Luger that would soon replace the Browning/Colt 1911. Beretta loaned me the prototype to take to Second Chance.

The other prototype was at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida (site of the joint services procurement tests). Operative word "was," as this pistol also showed up at the Second Chance shoot. Up at the Second Chance match in Michigan, Powers traded use of his Magmatic for various submachine guns and beaucoup ammunition.

I found the Beretta to be much sought after by cops and military, all of whom wanted to try the pistol and be able to tell everyone back home what they'd shot. As Powers was trading his Magmatic for guns and ammunition, I traded use of the prototype Beretta for submachine guns, but mostly thousands of rounds----ammo no doubt looted from armories. Image of mass mayhem as Chief of Police screams, "Where's the ammo?"

A cop with his department's Thompson M1921 falls in love with the .44 Magmatic; he loans Powers the chopper. In exchange, Jon Powers takes the THOMPSON SUBMACHINE GUN. The CHICAGO PIANO is an aesthetic and performance favorite of Powers. And you can see why: the Thompson exudes machine tool brilliance, as do the guns crafted by Jon Powers. This Model 1921 Thompson is restamped "1928" and carries the heavier M-1928 bolt, reducing the rate of fire from 800+ rpm to 500 rpm. Double pistol grips, ventilating rib barrel with Cutts Compensator, interchangeable stick magazines and 50-rd drum. Powers and I soon discover the 50-round drum on full blast runs dry in 4-seconds.

Jon Powers wastes no time putting the Thompson to work. The bowling pins are shot against the clock from 25 feet. Scantily clad----that is, wholesome----high school girls holding stop watches time each individual shooter, or team. Soft body armor inventor Richard Davis sits like a Kevlar Emperor in lifeguard chair and fires a revolver in the air to start each relay. The girl in an economy of cloth hits the stop button as your last pin thumps the ground. The pins are lined up on the front edge of a steel topped table, and must be pushed three feet to fall off the table. Pins often spin on the table, waiting on more lead before flying off to kiss the dirt.

For the 4-man team event, Powers and I are joined by a drug cop fresh from tangling with smugglers in Florida, and by firearms instructor/writer/marksman Massod Ayoob. Powers plays Chicago Piano, Florida cop on long magazine 12 gauge 870, Massod Ayoob on long magazine Remington 1100 automatic shotgun. And me with handgun----make that four handguns----a Jim Clark Colt 1911 borrowed from Colt representative Lew Sharpe; another borrowed Colt 1911 thrust in my belt; my Bo-Mar ribbed 5" Model 29 .44 Mag worked over by Ron Power and Mag-na-Port, with French walnut grips by knifemaker Clay Gault; and, last, my M-29 4" seen recently on this forum.

During one string of 40 pins----we were having too much fun----Powers empties the Chicago Piano, splattering pins, the drug agent shucks out a torrent of buckshot from his 870, Massod Ayoob empties his drainpipe-magazine Rem 1100. And your humble writer blasts 8-rounds apiece from two Colt 1911's----shooting the .45's one-at-a-time, naturally, followed by six .44's from the 5-inch 29. the boys reload feverishly as one orphan pin spins on the the table. Two .45's lay at this shooter's feet, the 5" 29 which swingss by lanyard from his neck as the M29 4-inch is drawn; its first shot spins the spinning pin off the table. Elapsed time 9 seconds, laughter and all.

A few beers one night in "town"----a street with a saloon. Drive back to hayfield camp site, pitched full of contestants tents. Powers sits crosslegged in his tent, cleaning the beautiful Thompson. Powers reassembles the chopper, studying it closely. Winds the magazine spring of the 50-round drum, loads in a box of GI ball, fastens cover.

Roar of two motorcycles, throttling down as they turn onto our hayfield campground. Tell by the sound it's the two LEO been with at the bar. Bikes rumble over a tent. Shouting inside the canvas.

BR-R-RAP... BR-R-R-R-A-A-APP----burst of M16. People in underwear, probably naked, firing at the stars. Jon Powers leaps out tent, muzzle erect, sliding drum into receiver. Wipes actuator. DUDDA DUDDA DUDDA----sky stitched full of bullet holes----DUDDA DUDDA... BA-BOOM BA-BOOM of shotguns... KA-POW POW POW of pistols... Smoke drifts across flashlight beams. The firing dies down. A murmur of satisfaction sweeps the tents. Hundreds of grinning faces go to sleep.

David Bradshaw
well lol he did mention every gun I did except the Tommy gun in that long drawn out boring story HEHEH oh well
 
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Here's an article by Dave Bradshaw who is reminiscing about Jon Powers creation on WWW.SINGLEACTIONS.COM

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwidzKz6ga_SAhXFzlQKHazlAF0QFggsMAM&url=http://singleactions.proboards.com/thread/10020/44-magmatic&usg=AFQjCNFrOWoKcML2PRP3YKOmF5Bgpe2pUA

Post by bradshaw on Feb 12, 2013 at 8:05pm
Jon Powers and I teamed up at one of Richard Davis' Second Chance bowling pin matches. Powers brought along a Magmatic, and I had one of two prototypes in the USA of the Beretta 9mm Luger that would soon replace the Browning/Colt 1911. Beretta loaned me the prototype to take to Second Chance.

The other prototype was at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida (site of the joint services procurement tests). Operative word "was," as this pistol also showed up at the Second Chance shoot. Up at the Second Chance match in Michigan, Powers traded use of his Magmatic for various submachine guns and beaucoup ammunition.

I found the Beretta to be much sought after by cops and military, all of whom wanted to try the pistol and be able to tell everyone back home what they'd shot. As Powers was trading his Magmatic for guns and ammunition, I traded use of the prototype Beretta for submachine guns, but mostly thousands of rounds----ammo no doubt looted from armories. Image of mass mayhem as Chief of Police screams, "Where's the ammo?"

A cop with his department's Thompson M1921 falls in love with the .44 Magmatic; he loans Powers the chopper. In exchange, Jon Powers takes the THOMPSON SUBMACHINE GUN. The CHICAGO PIANO is an aesthetic and performance favorite of Powers. And you can see why: the Thompson exudes machine tool brilliance, as do the guns crafted by Jon Powers. This Model 1921 Thompson is restamped "1928" and carries the heavier M-1928 bolt, reducing the rate of fire from 800+ rpm to 500 rpm. Double pistol grips, ventilating rib barrel with Cutts Compensator, interchangeable stick magazines and 50-rd drum. Powers and I soon discover the 50-round drum on full blast runs dry in 4-seconds.

Jon Powers wastes no time putting the Thompson to work. The bowling pins are shot against the clock from 25 feet. Scantily clad----that is, wholesome----high school girls holding stop watches time each individual shooter, or team. Soft body armor inventor Richard Davis sits like a Kevlar Emperor in lifeguard chair and fires a revolver in the air to start each relay. The girl in an economy of cloth hits the stop button as your last pin thumps the ground. The pins are lined up on the front edge of a steel topped table, and must be pushed three feet to fall off the table. Pins often spin on the table, waiting on more lead before flying off to kiss the dirt.

For the 4-man team event, Powers and I are joined by a drug cop fresh from tangling with smugglers in Florida, and by firearms instructor/writer/marksman Massod Ayoob. Powers plays Chicago Piano, Florida cop on long magazine 12 gauge 870, Massod Ayoob on long magazine Remington 1100 automatic shotgun. And me with handgun----make that four handguns----a Jim Clark Colt 1911 borrowed from Colt representative Lew Sharpe; another borrowed Colt 1911 thrust in my belt; my Bo-Mar ribbed 5" Model 29 .44 Mag worked over by Ron Power and Mag-na-Port, with French walnut grips by knifemaker Clay Gault; and, last, my M-29 4" seen recently on this forum.

During one string of 40 pins----we were having too much fun----Powers empties the Chicago Piano, splattering pins, the drug agent shucks out a torrent of buckshot from his 870, Massod Ayoob empties his drainpipe-magazine Rem 1100. And your humble writer blasts 8-rounds apiece from two Colt 1911's----shooting the .45's one-at-a-time, naturally, followed by six .44's from the 5-inch 29. the boys reload feverishly as one orphan pin spins on the the table. Two .45's lay at this shooter's feet, the 5" 29 which swingss by lanyard from his neck as the M29 4-inch is drawn; its first shot spins the spinning pin off the table. Elapsed time 9 seconds, laughter and all.

A few beers one night in "town"----a street with a saloon. Drive back to hayfield camp site, pitched full of contestants tents. Powers sits crosslegged in his tent, cleaning the beautiful Thompson. Powers reassembles the chopper, studying it closely. Winds the magazine spring of the 50-round drum, loads in a box of GI ball, fastens cover.

Roar of two motorcycles, throttling down as they turn onto our hayfield campground. Tell by the sound it's the two LEO been with at the bar. Bikes rumble over a tent. Shouting inside the canvas.

BR-R-RAP... BR-R-R-R-A-A-APP----burst of M16. People in underwear, probably naked, firing at the stars. Jon Powers leaps out tent, muzzle erect, sliding drum into receiver. Wipes actuator. DUDDA DUDDA DUDDA----sky stitched full of bullet holes----DUDDA DUDDA... BA-BOOM BA-BOOM of shotguns... KA-POW POW POW of pistols... Smoke drifts across flashlight beams. The firing dies down. A murmur of satisfaction sweeps the tents. Hundreds of grinning faces go to sleep.

David Bradshaw
That's a great story.
 

EPS

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Lol don't take it personal I just woke up I'm grumpy and sitting in a truck drinking coffee at a truck stop in Yakima just spreading the hate and discontent lol
 

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