Simply Triggers
J&B Firearm Sales
Buster Beaver Cerakote
HighLine Firearms
Low Price Guns
Sporting Systems
Oregon Arms & Ammunition
Gun Deals
Defensive Arts
Southwest Firearms
Advertise on Northwest Firearms
Oregon Rifleworks

RVTECH

Messages
9,894
Reactions
17,069
He's the man they hired, and the man they made.
Oh, they may have hired him but they didn't 'make' him - his environment made him - you can take the man out of the 'X' but you can't take the 'X' out of the man.

He obviously has some sort of 'connection' and identifies with criminals on some level as it seems he wants to 'protect' them in a roundabout way.
 
Messages
718
Reactions
1,374
America has now officially moved into clown land. Things are going to be run by clowns and the 3 ring circus side show is how it will all operate.

Grab a tub of popcorn and watch the show.
 

tac

Messages
7,729
Reactions
19,540
Whenever I think of the words 'police chief' and 'guns', I remember this -


(CNN)As the debate over guns continues in Washington and in communities across the country, there's at least one place where owning a gun is technically required by law.

In Kennesaw, Georgia, local law says that "every head of household residing in the city limits is required to maintain a firearm."

"If you're going to commit a crime in Kennesaw and you're the criminal -- are you going to take a chance that that homeowner is a law-abiding citizen?" asked Kennesaw Mayor Derek Easterling.

Wayne Arnold is one of those citizens. Among the weapons he keeps at home are an AR-15-style .223 caliber rifle, a variety of handguns and more.

"It gives me the ability to protect myself as opposed to being somewhere where you weren't allowed to have a firearm or it was frowned upon," said Arnold.

"More or less a political statement"

It may be the law in Kennesaw to own a gun, but the police department says it isn't actually enforced.
javascript:void(0)
Many locals CNN spoke to assumed that the law dated back to the town's founding, but it was actually only enacted in 1982. "It was meant to be kind of a crime deterrent," said Lt. Craig Graydon, who's been with the Kennesaw Police Department for over 30 years. "It was also more or less a political statement because the city of Morton Grove, Illinois, passed a city ordinance banning handguns from their city limits."

Back then, the town had a population of just a few thousand. Over three decades later, the law is still on the books.

Today, Kennesaw, a town of about 33,000 people, has had one murder in the last six years and a violent crime rate of below 2%.

But it's unclear whether that has anything to do with the gun law.

City officials say their relationship with the community is a key factor in maintaining public safety. "We can't say that just that gun law contributes x number of percent to why we have a low crime rate. It may be part of it, but it needs to be looked at from a whole picture," said Graydon. "Don't just look at the ordinance."

A small town that gets questions from around the country

As communities across the country re-examine their own relationship with guns in the wake of recent mass shootings, officials say they have been getting calls from all over the country -- and even as far away as Norway -- inquiring about the town's gun law.

"We get a lot of calls, conversation, and it seems to keep crime control, gun safety, things like that on the minds of many of the residents, because people are constantly talking about the gun law," said Lt. Graydon. "So that's been somewhat of a benefit to us."

"The first thing that most people say when they meet us, you know as a community is 'oh, it's not what I expected,'" said Mayor Easterling. "I don't know what they expect of people who arm themselves with guns at home, or what they're looking for, but really we're not that."

"People kind of get the image that it's the Wild West, where everybody walks around with a firearm strapped to their side, and it's not like that," Arnold said. "It's strictly a home defense system type of deal. There's no shootouts down the street."
 
Messages
3,250
Reactions
3,113
Did I miss something new? other than the whole world is going wacko.
I just read where Hasbro is renaming Mr. Potato head; "Potato head", cause it was really really offensive the way it was.:confused:
Life is finally gonna be good after this..right?
I wonder if there will be a class action lawsuit for the permanently offended tater tot. That is, squeezed in between the TV ads for asbestos and the folks who lost their hearing while building a better America.

Please Kid, don't call me mister, I'm just a potato to you. (with a few bad spots to boot)

:s0126: Sorry, I got lost:s0142:I was looking for that better America.


Best reason I now know of to never buy this product--good thing I don't have kids, so many toys & places they would never get to see/have

They better not change anything about my tater tots either
 
Messages
6,882
Reactions
13,588
Best reason I now know of to never buy this product--good thing I don't have kids, so many toys & places they would never get to see/have

They better not change anything about my tater tots either
You can call me names and tell me that meat is murder but if you screw with my tater tots, the talking is over.
 
Project Appleseed
Cerberus Training Group
Oregon Arms & Ammunition
Copeland Custom Gunworks
NW Custom Firearms
Advertise on Northwest Firearms
Sporting Systems
Southwest Firearms Forum

Latest Resource Reviews

New Classified Ads

Top Bottom