Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

No Powder

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Janes, Jul 19, 2013.

  1. Janes

    Janes Enid, Oklahoma Member

    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    9
    I was loading some 44 meg shells and I notice that my re-loader was making a different noise. I notice that the powder bar wasn't moving so I check one casing and found that there was no powder in it. There was a screw that came loose on the powder bar. I don't think that there are two many that didn't get powder. I was wondering if the primer has enough power to send the bullet part way down the barrel. If it does I hope that I don't have too many to push out of the barrel
     
  2. sheepdip

    sheepdip Redland Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,769
    Likes Received:
    1,064
    that is why I weigh every charge!!!
     
    Dyjital and (deleted member) like this.
  3. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    2,804
    Likes Received:
    1,859
    In most revolvers it the primer will have enough powder to stick the bullet in the forcing cone, which can cause a very inconvinient jam.

    And yes, this another one of those things I hate about dillon powder measures and the dillon 550, and a huge reason why I consider it one of the worst presses in existence and a dangerous option for the newcomer to reloading.
     
  4. SinisterSouthpaw

    SinisterSouthpaw SW WA Active Member

    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    76
    This is why using the same brand of brass, bullet (or at least weight of bullet) and primer is a good idea. Ideally they should all be from the same lot, but there is not nearly as much difference in weight between lots of one brand as there is between brands, as a rule. While all the components will not weigh exactly the same they will all be close enough that you can spot cartridges that got little or no powder just by weighing them. This will save wear and tear on your bullet puller. Mixing brands of brass will create enough doubt that disassembly of all the finished cartridges is probably advisable.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2013
  5. Janes

    Janes Enid, Oklahoma Member

    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    9
    I weighed all shells out and found 7 that was from 7 to 10 grains lighter. I pulled all 7 bullets and there was no powder. I guess when I changed out the powder bar I just forgot to tighten the screw, no fault of the Dillon loader.

    Thanks for the advise.
     
  6. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    537


    Doesn't matter what press you use, if you can't SEE powder in the case, don't put a "flipping" bullet on it. Either that or invest in a Powder Cop, a Lockout Die, or a Powder Check system.

    Of all persons, beginners should be the ones to ALWAYS look into the case to see if there is a powder charge. Simple enough to rig an LED lamp that shines into the case to make it easier to see.

    FWIW, that "Worst press in existence" is also one of the most popular presses to date. What I find strange is that in over 100k rounds on my 650 (and I no longer keep count) I have yet to have the powder measure fail to drop powder. Uneven weights (for my needs) perhaps, but never "no powder". Oh, well, what man makes, another man can screw up.
     
    Dyjital and (deleted member) like this.
  7. Janes

    Janes Enid, Oklahoma Member

    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    9
    You say "Worst press in existence" Are you referring to the 550B? This is the one that I have used for many years. What happen was when I changed out the powder bar I didn't get a screw tight that move the powder bar and after loading about 100 rounds it came out. You say that you have the 650 which is almost like the 550. Can you see down in the casing to see it you have powder in it?
     
  8. Matt15

    Matt15 Maple valley Member

    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    1
    I believe he was referring to AMProducts comment
     
  9. Papercidal

    Papercidal Vancouver ,Wa Active Member

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    112
    Yes with a 650 you can see straight down into the case after you charge it (when it is in station 3 and in station 4 before placing a bullet) but with every progressive I have ever used you could look inside the case for powder before placing bullet which you should do every time regardless of the press you use.
    As for weighing the completed rounds to determine whether you have powder or not some of my empty 9mm cases vary +- 4gr in weight (the same brand) which is close to as much as my charge weight so weighing to see if you missed one is probably not a good method.
    With a auto a missed charge usually will not cycle the action and you just have to knock the stuck bullet out
    with a revolver you are very likely to send a second behind it and destroy a barrel or stick the bullet in the forcing cone requiring a trip to a gunsmith to fix. I would personally pull all of them rather than take that risk.
     
  10. nwbobber

    nwbobber Longview, Wa. Active Member

    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    93
    I put a light above my rl550b so I can see in there better, I believe there are some made for it that fit in the aluminum block that holds the dies. I also try to select powders that fill the case so that I can see it easily, and a double charge will overfill the case. I think the RL550B is a great press, but a visual on your powder is a necessary step.
     
  11. nwbobber

    nwbobber Longview, Wa. Active Member

    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    93
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2013
  12. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    537
    I went a little over the top with my 650 press. I not only got a light to illuminate the case in the bullet seating station, I also got the "computer" that keeps track of every press stroke. Warns of short strokes, counts finished rounds, and also gives a tally of how much powder you should have used so you can compare with what you actually used.

    presslight.jpg

    SA Development Press Monitor


    This Press Monitor is really a well thought out "tool" and works on all progressives. Even gives a reminder to advance shell plate on 550's and will warn you if you forget (no more double charges due to "brain flatulence".

    Not that expensive when you take into consideration the cost of all the other tools and gadgets. I bought mine when the maker had them on sale.

    presslight.jpg
     
  13. Janes

    Janes Enid, Oklahoma Member

    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    9
    I am not worried about a double charge because you would have to resize the casing two times and on the second time it would be easier and that should draw your attention to it. The information you guys have given is very good. Thanks
     
  14. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    537
    Yes, you would think so and there would never be a double charge on progressive presses. Unfortunately we know that that's not always the case and there are numerous pictures on the internet of firearms that have paid the price.
     
  15. Janes

    Janes Enid, Oklahoma Member

    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    9
    I think that some people just don't pay attention to anything. When I heard my re-loader making a different noise I stopped, but I did run 7 through before I stopped.
     
  16. P7id10T

    P7id10T Cedar Hills Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    1,214
    Likes Received:
    1,243
    Bad Janes! Bad!
     
  17. unklekippy

    unklekippy In The Mountains Near Sprague River Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,324
    Likes Received:
    854
    A squib round(one that goes part way down a barrel from an insufficient charge) isn't dangerous in itself, it is dangerous when the next round slams into the first at full power. In a gas operated gun, it normally will not go past the ports, therefore not cycling the next round and making it easy to spot. In a revolver, you can only hear the difference in reports and maybe notice the lack of projectile hitting the target. It is much easier to blow up a revolver than a semi-auto in this situation. Mike Venturino once blew up a 1st Gen SAA with a squib. That's a $3-5,000 mistake, there.
     
  18. Janes

    Janes Enid, Oklahoma Member

    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    9
    As long I have been shooting I have never had a squib round. I would think the sound and the kick of the gun would be a lot different and a person should check to see what went wrong and not send another one down the barrel.
     
  19. Sodbuster

    Sodbuster Beaverton, OR Chief Cook/Bottle Washer

    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    126
    If you have a progressive press, this is a good reason to have a powder cop or check that will let you know if you don't have any powder in the case prior to seating the bullet.
     
  20. Janes

    Janes Enid, Oklahoma Member

    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    9
    I don't think that Dillon make a powder cop for the 550. If they did I think that I would buy one. I just wonder if Dillon would say there is a possibility of getting a squib if everything is working right.