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My dog is nipping at people

Koda

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If theirs one thing to remember about all dogs its this, "dogs do what works"
You have to find some way to make nipping not work for him, and he will stop. Easier said than done, but it will require persistance with training with a volunteer to act as the new person.
Example: when a dog jumps up in you, you raise your knee and step into him (most step back, which encourages him) and it causes him to change course (didnt work). You have to find some exercise along this line to work with the nipping, he could get it right away or coult take a while.

I would definetely get a muzzle for the immediate solution. Consult with a trainer for an hour is pretty affordable, and ask questions on what training to do on your own. I practice reward based training with my dog, but wouldnt be against proper use of a shock collar if it came to it.
 

OldBroad44

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Oohrah spoke to the issue of dogs that are unstable. Thought I'd mention that I don't think there is any reason so far to suppose that Oregunhunter's dog is unstable. It's more likely a problem of having accidently taught it the wrong things, or just failed to correct undesirable patterns as they developed. Easy to do.

One reason why I think some pro help might especially be useful is that the ordinary approaches to training pet pooches not to bite involve teaching them that all humans are dominant to them and must never be aggressed upon. That's relatively easy. And the resulting dog can still be a functional watch dog, that is "alert" dog that informs owners of a problem but doesn't do any guarding or protecting. However, if you want the dog to protect you by attacking an assailant or attacking someone trying to break into your home when you are gone, you need something else. You need a dog that refrains from attacking humans unless there is cause but will do so when there is. And that dog absolutely must not be taught that that all humans are dominant to it. That's much more complicated.
 
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+1 to the two guys who said your dog is testing boundaries and doesn’t respect your alpha position as being in charge of the situation.
This does not mean you need to beat your dog. Just make sure that he understands you have the situation handled and that can he be his friendly self. When my dog acts out, I roll him onto his back, hold his snout, and look him in the eyes and tell him it’s not ok. He’s also one of the most friendly and well disciplined dogs I know - with the caveat he is getting enough attention at home.

I would avoid associating a fear stimulus like electrical shocks with a stranger. Personally, I also think it is senseless for someone else to train your dog. It may work for a few weeks, but I think the problem is that he needs to understand that you are the alpha and he has to listen and respect you (and/or your wife), and not some random trainer. If are Being coached to train your dog, then that is a different story.
There is NEVER any reason to beat a dog. I've was involved with a GWP that had to be put down because of his unchecked aggression, but even he was never mistreated before he was humanely put down. That kind of dog is a training/owner failure.

I agree with all you said other than not necessarily using a trainer. It's usually a better outcome than learning on your own dog if you aren't trained to do it. A well-trained dog knows commands and situations and will respond to anyone trained to work it.

To the OP, I'm not sure why you'd need a 7 week program to train you to deal with this common issue. Did you get the dog locally? If so the breeder might have an idea who to send you to.
 
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Nocaster

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Had that problem with my GSD when she was a pup. Used the "muzzling" technique per my dog trainer, worked like a charm. No more nipping. You squeeze their muzzle (the dog, not the person) putting pressure on the area between the nose and eyes until they squeal and go into submission, then "love them up", petting and sayng "it's ok"
 
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+1 On rolling the dog on it's back. A friend of mine had owned a few Great Pyrenees and they are notoriously headstrong (not to mention big!). His current dog is close to 150lbs and will immediately stop unwanted behavior when he's rolled. Do it immediately, and every time your dog nips or attempts to. He'll get the point in short order.
 

Koda

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I only reccommend reward based training.
Punishment training can build resentment, why some breeds lash out later in life "for no apparent reason".....
 
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I'm sorry. If the habit cannot be broken, the dog must be euthanized. Regardless of how much you care for it, in the end, it is just a dog. Humans come first! That said, The muzzling and rolling treatments should first be attempted.

Good luck and may God bless.
 

Cavedweller

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So my German Sheperd that I’ve bragged about has decided to nip peppers butts when they come over. It’s new people. And the amazon guy. Is there some simple tensing tips that I can do rather than paying a trainer to solves our human dog over failures?
Always introduce your dog to new people. When someone your dog doesn't know arrives at your house, have your dog on a leash. Have the guest offer their hand for the dog to sniff. Only give the dog enough leash to sniff the person's hand. Explain to the guest(s) what is going on. This is a courtesy to your guest. Give the dog a few minutes to calm down before releasing them, keep them by your side if necessary. It's about being in control, it's not about "dominance". If the dog continues to misbehave, then isolate them in an unoccupied room or the garage for a short period of time.

It should never be necessary to beat, strike, or hurt your dog to get obedience. A stern "no" is usually enough to correct a well-trained dog. Always use positive reinforcement. Reward good behavior with treats, praise, and physical affection. Have a relationship based on love and not fear. Get a book about dogs and read it.

Avoid the pack leader approach for 2 reasons:
1) You want your dog to respect all humans, not just the one it recognizes as pack leader. It needs to behave well when you are not around.
2) The position of pack leader is temporary. The pack leader is always being challenged by those lower on the pecking order. People who find their dog "always pushing the boundaries" have trained their dog to behave this way.
 
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I have a GSD and I agree with the previous post above except "guest offering a hand for dog to sniff". At least with my dog, I have to introduce anyone who is coming through the door to the dog. This means the dog is standing by me. I say "hi" to whomever is coming in and start a conversation in normal tone. My dog will then wander up and smell your pant leg and decide if you're OK. If so, you can let him smell your hand and he will want you to pet him. If you reach down first and put your hand out he will train you not to do that.
 

Cavedweller

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I have a GSD and I agree with the previous post above except "guest offering a hand for dog to sniff". At least with my dog, I have to introduce anyone who is coming through the door to the dog. This means the dog is standing by me. I say "hi" to whomever is coming in and start a conversation in normal tone. My dog will then wander up and smell your pant leg and decide if you're OK. If so, you can let him smell your hand and he will want you to pet him. If you reach down first and put your hand out he will train you not to do that.
Good point. Dogs are extremely perceptive and can sense friend from foe by the owner's behavior. A few moments of friendly interaction with a guest is often enough to reassure them. I think the key is to have the dog under control during the interaction.
 
OP
Oregonhunter5
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Thanks for all the points.
Good info!
I’m a life long dog owner. But first time German shepherd owner. I need to fix this now. I don’t need a lawsuit. And I feel 100% killing him isn’t on the menu here. But some dogs, yea they need to go.
 

SUPER X

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Tonight a intoxicated woman seen my dog in the rig and wanted to pet him .He loves woman and kids .But It was obvious he was not comfortable with her. Mabey because she was obviously drunk .If I'm there he looks to me for a judgement call If I'm not and boundrys are crossed he will back a person off .
That's what dogs do if they are well adjusted .they are family protecting family.
When he rarely shuns my authority I have to sturnly raise my voice and he snaps into formation :D. Like people used to with their kids .:eek:. I've had dogs that the female of the house baby talks them and they walked all over her attempted authority .
 

Dyjital

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Shock collar.

One that does beep, vibrate or variable levels of shock.

doesn’t respond in beep, then vibrate. Does it again.... mild shock and then escalate as needed.

what you need to do is catch the dog right before the action takes place while it’s starting to zone in on the nip. Redirecting that thought or action will help end is sooner and take less correction.

My dog is under 100% verbal control now. A raised voice is the last command before I bite back. Normally it’s a snap of the fingers or a “shhht” from my mouth that gets obedience. Taps of the hand anywhere in a specific pattern gets him to do a command. A little over 18 months old.
 
OP
Oregonhunter5
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Tonight a intoxicated woman seen my dog in the rig and wanted to pet him .He loves woman and kids .But It was obvious he was not comfortable with her. Mabey because she was obviously drunk .If I'm there he looks to me for a judgement call If I'm not and boundrys are crossed he will back a person off .
That's what dogs do if they are well adjusted .they are family protecting family.
When he rarely shuns my authority I have to sturnly raise my voice and he snaps into formation :D. Like people used to with their kids .:eek:. I've had dogs that the female of the house baby talks them and they walked all over her attempted authority .
This describes my dog to a T
 
OP
Oregonhunter5
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Shock collar.

One that does beep, vibrate or variable levels of shock.

doesn’t respond in beep, then vibrate. Does it again.... mild shock and then escalate as needed.

what you need to do is catch the dog right before the action takes place while it’s starting to zone in on the nip. Redirecting that thought or action will help end is sooner and take less correction.

My dog is under 100% verbal control now. A raised voice is the last command before I bite back. Normally it’s a snap of the fingers or a “shhht” from my mouth that gets obedience. Taps of the hand anywhere in a specific pattern gets him to do a command. A little over 18 months old.
Exact same wirh my dog and I
 

SUPER X

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Well when the dems start coming to get our guns, I will say good dog. Until then I want to tell him when to hammer down. Lol!
Alot of those antitard types :s0136: have moved in around me transplanted from Cali ect . They get like 5LB dogs and are scared of real dogs.next they will be trying to control the size and breed of dogs allowed. To put it nicely they make me SICK :eek:
 
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Maybe we can put a shock collar on my sister-in-law. If I could arrange for her to receive a shock every time she began to overeat, my BIL may finally have the ability to shoehorn her through the front door.
 

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