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model 10 .38spl with bulletS lodged in barrel

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by haruka, Nov 6, 2010.

  1. haruka

    haruka Portland OR, 97219 New Member

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    title pretty much explains my problem, theres like 4 rds stuck in the pipe.(would have stopped at the first jam but I was next to a large waterfall and it kept me from realizing where my bullets were going) I would have tried to press them out with a nylon dowel but one of the bullets is jammed right where the cylinder meets the barrel and has jammed the cylinder shut so I have nowhere to press the rest, this is where it gets even more complicated, I tried to push on the bullet jamming the cylinder out of the way by drilling a narrow hole about half the diameter of the bullet stopping I hoped at the last bullet.... it was desperate and stupid lol I messed it up even worse because its still jammed and now all ive got is a bunch of bullet jackets with no lead, stuck as they were when it all started.. so idk if this can be salvaged but I thought id try. maybe a new barrel?(cylinder needs to be open to replace) its a late 1940s-maybe early50s smith and wesson model ten #470598 with the half-moon sights and tapered barrel. its not in the best of shape but all this jamming hasnt seemed to have destroyed the frame or affected the rest of the gun, I need to fix it soon though if I do, B.powder/primer residue or something is starting to cause light rust spots on the cylinder. and I cant clean it without the gun unjammed. dont shoot reloaded ammunition from dicks in Washington square mall.. it primer fires/or just fails to ignite entirely/atall.
     
  2. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

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    Considering that the barrel didn't explode after the first squib round, I'd say the reloads had no powder in them, just primer.

    Personally, I'd suggest contacting the seller (Dick's?) before you continue any more work and see if you can get them to reimburse you for the cost of repairing/replacing the gun. I'd then recommend calling around to find a smith who can do the work to remove the bullets, but more importantly, to make sure that your pistol is still safe to use. It may have been damaged beyond repair.

    Good luck to you.

    Keith
     
  3. Velzey

    Velzey Estacada, Oregon Gunsmith Gunsmith Bronze Vendor Bronze Supporter

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    Take it to the Gunbroker in Clackamas, they have a pretty good smith that works for them. He has repaired several firearms for me that I messed up pretty bad!
     
  4. FG1

    FG1 Up on a hill in Southern Oregon New Member

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    Years ago when I had a gun brought in under similar conditions where someone had loaded some shells and contaminated powder with excess bullet lube they had enough poop to go in barrel and not exit. I used a piece of tubing ( an old aluminun arrow shaft) for a guide to keep drill bit from scoring bore while I slowly drilled bullets out down to where the last one was lodged between forcing cone and cylinder and stopped . I then used a brass drift that passed through hole I drilled and tapped last bullet back in cartridge case so I could open cylinder. Then the the cylinder could be emptied. I then welded a large wood screw to a rod longer than barrel , added a 'T' handle and wrapped some electrical tape around rod to protect bore. Placed barrel in vise with wood and leather jaw pads and started screwing 'bullet puller' into bullets and pulling them . All eight of them, yep eight of them , he had reloaded and kept shooting until cylinder wouldnt turn ! There was gummy powder in between the bullets lodged in barrel !
    Gun wasnt harmed except for lead smear in barrel which cleaned up with bronze brush and solvent . This was a 6" stainless S&W 357.
     
  5. haruka

    haruka Portland OR, 97219 New Member

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    yeah im pretty sure im just going to have to bring it to a smith, im sure the barrel is shot, i heard that the barrels are machined roughly on korean/WW war era smith and wesson model 10s, but mine looks pretty deformed, im suprised i didnt lose some fingers though really. the frame looks intact, no cracks or other noticeable change in tolerances, anyways so I appreciate the advice, I got some good numbers for some smiths and im pretty confident i will shoot it again someday. i just thought even a smith might no be able to figure it out but ive changed my mind.