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Lever action .357 opinions......

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...I wonder why those and not the others?
My understanding from what I have read from users that described the issue has more to do with the decisions made when these reproductions were initially made. Those like the 1892 which have it and were made by Miroku before others initaily had it and now it's stuck with it. However later when coming out with the 1866 or 1873 they decided not to and so it doesn't. So for some reason whether legally or for reasons of liability the 1892 is now stuck with it. I don't know for certain and I am just relaying what others have said.
 

User 1234

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I didn’t realize that any of the Miroku guns omitted the manual safeties, thanks. That said, although I would consider one of theirs I would still hesitate because of the GCA 1968 Miroku manufacturer marking on the barrel.
 

slimmer13

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As a disabled vet born 4th generation of Japanese descent, it is not pleasant
to see this terminology used to describe products made in Japan. Nor is pleasant to describe the Arisaka ammunition “Jap”.
I understand the use of the word “JAP” has meaning prior to WW2.
My Grandfather, as a U.S. citizen, was incarcerated. Subsequently he voluntarily enlisted in the ARMY. 442nd RCT. Came back stateside and was
was labeled as a JAP although he was a highly decorated soldier.
My Father was drafted into the army during the Korean War. He was on the eastern side of the Inchon. He would not talk about the war. And labeled as as Jap stateside.
My Uncle in Mt. Vernon WA was a career Officer in the Army. He was SF
1963-1965 “winning hearts and minds” in Vietnam. Made Adjunct to the JCS.
I enlisted into the Army in early 1972 in II Corps and was sent to Vietnam voluntarily. Stayed until April 1975. I was wounded during the evacuation.
My cousin did 2 tours in Afghanistan. He is a Brig. General in the Illinois
National Guard.
So perhaps you do not know that the word “JAP” is offensive to me and
my family. And I’ll let it go at that.

By the way, I have a decent sized collection of 1894 Winnie’s. I have to
say I’m a bit of a snob when it comes Wincester’s. They are from New Haven,
Conn. Because U.S. only!
Thank you for the service of you and your family. And I think most people these days just use it as a shorter way to say Japanese. I dont think it was meant as an insult or slur.
 
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I didn’t realize that any of the Miroku guns omitted the manual safeties, thanks. That said, although I would consider one of theirs I would still hesitate because of the GCA 1968 Miroku manufacturer marking on the barrel.
Whether Miroku or Uberti when it comes to reproductions neither are 100% accurate. So it really is which one that's either least offensive or most appealing to you. Only you can determine that. I wasn't fortunate enough to be able to compare the Uberti and Winchester Miroku in person but had to rely on those that had. Based on my research the Winchester Miroku was more appealing to me. From everything I have found before and after the purchase I believe I made the right choice that fits me best. But hey, many have made the opposite decision and been perfectly happy as well.


I did forget to mention the 1866 cannot be gotten in 357. I know that's true for Miroku and pretty sure the same for Uberti. That's because the receiver is in a brass alloy in one kind or another. But as said you can do so with an 1873.
 
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I guess my recommendation to the OP is to abandon the 357 requirement and buy an original Winchester in 44-40 $$$$
If going vintage or original do yourself a favor and do some research as well. Pre 1964 fairly easy but maybe more expensive. Afterwards there are probably some years best to avoid.
 

DeanMk

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I didn’t realize that any of the Miroku guns omitted the manual safeties, thanks. That said, although I would consider one of theirs I would still hesitate because of the GCA 1968 Miroku manufacturer marking on the barrel.
What is the significance of the "GCA 1968 Miroku" mark on the barrel and why is it a bad thing?
 

User 1234

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The manufacturer must stamp the gun with its name and location because of the Gun Control Act of 1968, and because Miroku is the manufacturer of the current Winchester rifles you get a gun stamped with Miroku’s markings and Winchester’s markings.
 
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That Win. Short Rifle looks to have the right pieces

Browning ‘92 in 357 or 44 mag.

I love 1892s that snick open and close.
Yup.
The B92 would be my first choice, and I have owned several 38/ 357 lever actions.
 

DeanMk

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The manufacturer must stamp the gun with its name and location because of the Gun Control Act of 1968, and because Miroku is the manufacturer of the current Winchester rifles you get a gun stamped with Miroku’s markings and Winchester’s markings.
Ok, but why is that a bad thing?
 

jbett98

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Because it ruins the aesthetics, just like this lawyered up Ruger Security Six..

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What is the significance of the "GCA 1968 Miroku" mark on the barrel and why is it a bad thing?
It isn't necessarily except that instead of being made in America where this gun manufacturer where the gun initially was invented and made in America is now licensed and being made using the Winchester name is being made in Japan.

By the way Miroku is known to make some very nice guns and in fact when compared to the original ones are even better due to today metrology better than the originals.
 
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User 1234

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I’ve also heard that the Miroku guns are the best quality out of all years of Winchesters, but I also suspect that it is difficult to make that comparison when new samples of the earliest guns are rare or non existent.
 

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