Help me with some info my new to me knife Vintage CTS

Old Noob

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Ok, so I figured out this is a Japanese brand CTS knife. Looks like all they don't sell anything like this anymore. I'm guessing it is from the 60's or 70's.
I'm guessing it is Nickel Damascus steel. Not sure.
Anybody know anything about it? I'm not selling it. It's a keeper.
6 1/4" long blade. 11 1/2" long total.

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Sbarton

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Pretty Damascus pattern, nice blade shape, handles kinda funky. Does it take a good edge and does it hold it well? What exactly are you trying find out about it?
 

Old Noob

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Pretty Damascus pattern, nice blade shape, handles kinda funky. Does it take a good edge and does it hold it well? What exactly are you trying find out about it?
Just anything about it.
Yes blade takes a good edge. I have not had it very long. Nothing sure how long it will hold it.
 

Sbarton

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Just anything about it.
Yes blade takes a good edge. I have not had it very long. Nothing sure how long it will hold it.
How well the steel holds an edge can tell us a bit about the component materials. If they call it nickel steel it may have been made using L6 for the shiny layer and something like 10xx type steel for the dark layer. L6 is good knife steel, tough and takes a decent edge if heat treated properly. It was commonly used for circular saw blade plates and still used for Damascus by some good bladesmiths.
It's hard to know what it's made of if the manufacturer doesn't tell you.
If you really are curious, you can contact the manufacturer.
 
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Looks like a one-off, in which case I doubt that anybody will be able to tell you anything about it at all, except CTS who made it. As I'm sure you know, they do VERY high end kitchen knives these days, and a full chef's rack can set you back a couple of thousand dollars.

I, too, have a unique patch knife that looks pretty much like any other short-bladed sheath knife, made from a wagon spring from an old wagon from the late 1800's that came from back east, and myrtle wood from Oregon. The puukko-style sheath was made from leather from a tannery local to the guy who made it for me, in return for writing him an Irish saying for his son's wedding. As such, it's worth more than gold. I know who made it, but nobody else does.
 
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