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Gun Range Withdrawal

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by SynapticSilence, Aug 15, 2012.

  1. SynapticSilence

    SynapticSilence Battle Ground, WA Well-Known Member

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    Well, I'm sitting here after having an emergency appendectomy on Sunday. I only stayed one night in the hospital, but I had a host of activities planned for this week and next week. I already had off from work and could do things that I wanted to do, not needed to do. I have maybe 1000 rounds sitting there waiting for me to send them flying at hypervelocity toward something, but the wife is monitoring me like a hawk to make sure I don't engage in any unauthorized activities. I argued that there is nothing in my discharge instructions that say "No Firearms", but she says I was told not to engage in any heavy lifting. She insists that lifting the Ruger New Model Blackhawk 45LC/45ACP convertible I just bought and want desperately to shoot constitutes heavy lifting. OK, it is heavy, but not THAT heavy. After my neck surgery in May, I had to go through opiate withdrawal when I went off the heavy pain meds I was on for several years to keep working. That sucked. This is very, very similar and bordering on worse, I'd say.
     
  2. Nightshade

    Nightshade vancouver,WA Well-Known Member

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    glad to hear your bouncing back after surgery, shooting is good therapy
     
  3. accessbob

    accessbob Molalla, OR 2A Supporter

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    Sorry to hear about that. I had emergency surgery about 5 years ago for a perforated ulcer and had to spend 10 days in the hospital. Not fun not being able to do anything and I can see how you'd be having trouble not being able to go shooting when you were all ready (supplies and mentally) and then not being able to go. Best wishes for a speedy recovery.