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Gear I recently ditched from my BOB (shovel, camp stove, etc.)

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I've taken a few BOB trips recently to test my gear and decided to ditch gear that I either didn't use or didn't REALLY need.

-E-Tool: Only thing I ever used this for was digging holes to crap in. I could do this with a stick and save myself 2 lbs...

-Camp stove and fuel canister: It was one of the backpacking isopro ones. Initially I wanted it to stay low key, not have a fire, but then I decided a water filter I had with me provided me with clean water to drink without fire, as did water purification tablets, and I packed food that didn't need cooking, such as GORP. Weight saved, 2.5 lbs. I still have a stainless container for cooking, but would only do so if the coast is clear.

-Kukri machete: this helped me chop two HUGE trees that had fallen over the road when car camping years ago, but other than that I've never used it. Weight saved, 1.5 lbs.

-Becker BK2: I carry a Mora companion in my vest and a pocket knife. 99% of the time I use my pocket knife with the Mora as a backup. I also have a multi-tool. I don't plan on batoning wood, it's a dumb use for a knife anyways.

-0 degree sleeping bag: unless it's winter, I did just fine with mylar blankets overnight. I was toasty warm all night. They are loud AF though....Weight saved, 5 lbs.

-Hatchet: Not as good as a splitting maul and wedge, and risky when you're tired, cold and hungry. Don't want to risk injury. If I needed to split wood, I'd rather have this than a knife that I risk breaking, but it's not necessary IMO. Weight saved, 2 lbs.

My BoB weight is now 20 lbs including the pack weight (Blackhawk 3 day assault pack at around 4 lbs) and 7 lbs for survival vest. Weight saved, 13 lbs. This does not count ammo, NV goggles (separate kit).

I'm debating taking magazines and NV gear and attaching to the outside of my BOB so that I just have ONE bag. Only beef with that is my "tactical" pack is much lighter than a BOB and designed purely for fighting (water, gloves, IFAK, mags, monocular, etc, batteries, etc.)

Or I can use a slightly larger pack to store it all, but my concern with this is maneuverability.



Thoughts?
 
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I dont have a BOB, but in my backpacking pack and SAR packs, I carry a MSR whisperlight/titanium cup and FD food. I dont see how you could go any lighter than that.

And a good sturdy knife is indispensable and can be used for processing firewood using the baton method.
 
In the woods or the neighborhood park for that matter, simply grab the smaller sticks laying around everywhere for the campfire and save oneself all that needless "batoning". If the wood is wet, having a sharp knife for shavings might be critical.
 
I've taken a few BOB trips recently to test my gear and decided to ditch gear that I either didn't use or didn't REALLY need.

-E-Tool: Only thing I ever used this for was digging holes to crap in. I could do this with a stick and save myself 2 lbs...

-Camp stove and fuel canister: It was one of the backpacking isopro ones. Initially I wanted it to stay low key, not have a fire, but then I decided a water filter I had with me provided me with clean water to drink without fire, as did water purification tablets, and I packed food that didn't need cooking, such as GORP. Weight saved, 2.5 lbs. I still have a stainless container for cooking, but would only do so if the coast is clear.

-Kukri machete: this helped me chop two HUGE trees that had fallen over the road when car camping years ago, but other than that I've never used it. Weight saved, 1.5 lbs.

-Becker BK2: I carry a Mora companion in my vest and a pocket knife. 99% of the time I use my pocket knife with the Mora as a backup. I also have a multi-tool. I don't plan on batoning wood, it's a dumb use for a knife anyways.

-0 degree sleeping bag: unless it's winter, I did just fine with mylar blankets overnight. I was toasty warm all night. They are loud AF though....Weight saved, 5 lbs.

-Hatchet: Not as good as a splitting maul and wedge, and risky when you're tired, cold and hungry. Don't want to risk injury. If I needed to split wood, I'd rather have this than a knife that I risk breaking, but it's not necessary IMO. Weight saved, 2 lbs.

My BoB weight is now 20 lbs including the pack weight (Blackhawk 3 day assault pack at around 4 lbs) and 7 lbs for survival vest. Weight saved, 13 lbs. This does not count ammo, NV goggles (separate kit).

I'm debating taking magazines and NV gear and attaching to the outside of my BOB so that I just have ONE bag. Only beef with that is my "tactical" pack is much lighter than a BOB and designed purely for fighting (water, gloves, IFAK, mags, monocular, etc, batteries, etc.)

Or I can use a slightly larger pack to store it all, but my concern with this is maneuverability.



Thoughts?
If you want some lightweight instant fire, get some trioxane tablets. They come in a small foil pouch and light easily. Fairly cheap on ebay. You can cook on them, make a bigger fire, etc.

1566193266399.png
 
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E4mafia

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Dont forget physical fitness more on the side of endurance and stamina. Better to be able to walk miles than lift heavy objects. Long as you can tolerate the pack for miles with some breaks and not feel broke off you are solid.
 

gmerkt

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I can't do without the hatchet, makes a nice auxiliary weapon. Yes, the baby wipes are a must. A few days of using tree leaves will make you a believer. And my bag must contain at least one pack of Franz Party Animals, no substitute for those in the woods.
 

s1xty7

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In my 72 hour pack, even though food isn't a primary need in a shorter duration survival situation, I carry a few Power Bars (super dense fuel) and a small folding titanium stand that holds Esbit tabs with a small aluminum foil wind shroud. I have a titanium cup with lid and some hot cocoa and bullion. When cold and miserable, the psychological benefits of having something warm to drink offsets the weight.

small_pack_stove_2012-04-10.jpg

Just a consideration. This stove setup isn't much heavier than the cup alone, which I would still want as it is beneficial to have a vessel that holds liquids and can stand up to fire. Definitely a good job on shedding weight though!
 

Joe13

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A lot of this stuff is so situational that it’s hard to determine what anyone but yourself will need...

My GHB is pretty basic because I work 5 miles from home and 99% of the time I am within 10 miles of home.

At that point I always have water with me anyway and I won’t NEED food for a 2-4 hour walk home or an axe or anything else.


Now when I head out to scout the woods or go hunting my gear is completely different and I take things I may want if I break a leg and am stuck for a couple days till someone can find me.

I can sort of agree with needing to be stamina fit but for me moving heavy weights conditions me much better then walking on a treadmill does and in a quarter of the time. So YMMV depending on your fitness level to begin with.


Also, if you don’t know how to use what you put in your bag then it’s just wasted weight - I always try and pack things that have a lot of multiple potential uses so I have options for things and not single use specialty tools.

Just my 2¢
 
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Bugout, 72, hr, assault, and long term survival bags all have different setups.
Here an esbit stove with trioxane small folding shovel cup and fire steel.
They way ounces.
I'm just gonna comment on these things.
I could go on for hours about different setups that I use, and put into practice.
I train alot with solo survival and minimalist kits.

20190819_095834.jpg 20190819_095834.jpg
 

AndyinEverson

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Also, if you don’t know how to use what you put in your bag then it’s just wasted weight -
Wise words there...

Practice with the items you chose to carry in your bag , in your back yard or on a weekend overnight camping trip...
See what actually works for you and get good with it now , when you choose to use it , versus finding out that it doesn't work for you at all ...when you need it to.
Andy
 
I’d ditch the Mylar blankets and go with the old school USGI rain poncho and a poncho liner.... light weight and quiet. I spent many a chilly night wrapped up in those instead of the issued mummy fart-sack, and you’d be surprised how warm it actually keeps you while on the fly, as well as being rain gear during bad weather.

I can count on one hand how many times I used the USGI mummy fart-sack in the field, and that was in a proper bivouac site and not while on the bounce like you’d be in a GH or BO situation.
 
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In my 72 hour pack, even though food isn't a primary need in a shorter duration survival situation, I carry a few Power Bars (super dense fuel) and a small folding titanium stand that holds Esbit tabs with a small aluminum foil wind shroud. I have a titanium cup with lid and some hot cocoa and bullion. When cold and miserable, the psychological benefits of having something warm to drink offsets the weight.

View attachment 609785

Just a consideration. This stove setup isn't much heavier than the cup alone, which I would still want as it is beneficial to have a vessel that holds liquids and can stand up to fire. Definitely a good job on shedding weight though!
If you swapped over to a cat food can or fancee feast stove and a small bottle of alcohol, it has more uses than fuel tabs. Infected cuts, splinters, pitch removal, clean your knife, apply to baby wipe for monkey butt are just a few uses. Heavier yes, but worth considering.
 
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