Dead .22 LR

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by ZigZagZeke, Apr 11, 2013.

  1. ZigZagZeke

    ZigZagZeke
    Eugene
    Curmudgeon Silver Supporter 2015 Volunteer

    Messages:
    3,198
    Likes Received:
    5,223
    I bought 500 Russian made .22 LR rounds at a gun show a couple years ago for something like $5. It was stored in a locked and sealed ammo can in my shop. I finally got around to trying it a few days ago. The first 3 rounds didn't ignite, though the firing pin strike was nice and deep. The 4th round was a squib that was nearly inaudible, but cleared the barrel (whew!). At that point I quit using it and went to some Remington .22 LR I had. All was well. The rifle functioned perfectly.

    So I have a question. What's the best way to get rid of this bad rimfire ammo?
     
  2. Nutty4Guns

    Nutty4Guns
    Portland
    ADHD Superstar

    Messages:
    1,010
    Likes Received:
    444
    Put them back in the ammo can and forget where you put the can.
     
  3. ZigZagZeke

    ZigZagZeke
    Eugene
    Curmudgeon Silver Supporter 2015 Volunteer

    Messages:
    3,198
    Likes Received:
    5,223
    Actually, due to the possibility of another squib that doesn't clear the barrel with someone who's not as careful as I am, I'd like to make them unusable.
     
  4. Nwcid

    Nwcid
    Yakima and N of Spokane
    Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,612
    Likes Received:
    1,510
    Pull the bullets with pliers and use them for casting.
     
  5. Trailboss

    Trailboss
    Vancouver, WA
    Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    1,048
    Drop them into a mature camp fire, stand back 20 feet and allow em to pop. Or, soak them in a coffee can with warm soapy water for a day, then bury them. Rimfire ammo is much less resistant to water then centerfire. The rimfire bullets don't seal as well and will leak with a bit of soap added to the water.
     
  6. Swedish K

    Swedish K
    SW Washington
    Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,967
    Likes Received:
    1,316
    Odd - the only problem I ever had with the Russian 22 was that nasty coating that seemed to gum up the gun and stick the case in the chamber after 20 ish rounds.
     
  7. RVTECH

    RVTECH
    Wickiup Junction
    Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,026
    Likes Received:
    5,292
    How ironic - I had the same thing happen last night, but with a CCI CB cap. A couple years ago I found a 100 round plastic box of CCI CB caps in a traded in RV and wanted to see what they would do so I dropped one into the chamber of my Bersa 644 and shot at a wood block in my shop and the primer wet pop and that was it and the bullet stuck in the barrel about a 1/2 inch. I don't know how long they were in the RV but they sat for a couple years on a shelf of my loading bench before last night.
     
  8. deadshot2

    deadshot2
    NW Quadrant WA State
    Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    541
    There were a lot of boxes of this floating around a few years ago. Some of the competitors at a local club kept passing a box or two around just to mess with their buddies.
     
  9. jluck

    jluck
    Really,Really, Close to Newport Oregon 97365
    Voted #1 Member

    Messages:
    1,887
    Likes Received:
    1,216
    Heck, even worthless .22 ammo should still be worth 50 a brick..... :)
     
  10. Nutty4Guns

    Nutty4Guns
    Portland
    ADHD Superstar

    Messages:
    1,010
    Likes Received:
    444
    All joking aside, pulling the bullets with pliers is a good idea. If you don't want to do all that work, you could take them to your local range and drop them in the "dud" can.
     
    ZigZagZeke and (deleted member) like this.
  11. AMProducts

    AMProducts
    Maple Valley, WA
    Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer

    Messages:
    2,920
    Likes Received:
    2,103
    Pulling 22LR bullets with pliers is trivial, I had a bunch of .22LR that managed to have a bottle of hoppes spilled on it (not by me mind you), but somehow I ended up with the bag. I ended up just ripping all the bullets out, dumping the powder into a coffee can. The bullets were melted down, and are a good source of pure lead for bullet casting, the cases got washed and cleaned and I plan to use them for making .223 jackets one of these days, and the powder got burned up for new years.
     
  12. redhippie

    redhippie
    People's republic of PDX
    Active Member

    Messages:
    152
    Likes Received:
    35
    I would suggest looking to see if your county or municipality has a "Household Hazardous Waste" event. If you are more rural, try contacting Or. DEQ, hazardous waste section to see if they are having a regional collection event. These are inexpensive ways of properly disposing of all sorts of things we don't want in the environment.
     
  13. skywag

    skywag
    On the Columbia River
    Active Member

    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    27
    Just bury them.
     
  14. spitball

    spitball
    Steilacoom
    Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    3
    1. Save them for the mandatory, Federal turn in that is on the way and tell them it's all the ammo that you have. 2. Leave them with the cheap, decoy .22 you should have out for the crack heads who break into your house. 3. You could probably get $50 for them at the next Tacoma buy back. 4.Dump them in a dud can at the range so a re-loader can get the lead 5. Toss them out in the mud at low tide.
     

Share This Page