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Oregon Concealed Carry Oregon in vehicle

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Hey guys and gals, Whats the short on how I can carry in a vehicle.
I am liscensed with my CC but I am rarely in a car so I just transport in a lockbox unloaded and gear back up at my destination, is this needed.
 
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If you have an Oregon permit/license then you are within the law carrying within a private vehicle.


Notice it contains an exception for concealed handgun license
 
I was reading up on the laws The Heretic linked to, what the heck is a "dirk"? I know what a dagger is, at least I used to know, never hear of a dirk.
 

CRBMoA

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As noted by my esteemed brethren, if you are a permitted CCer in OR you may carry in your vehicle.

Dang! Beat me to it when I finally knew something useful, lol.
 
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and otherwise if you dont have a carry permit? would it be fine to have an unloaded firearm in a locked box in the trunk? like...a bugout survival box? as long as nit readily accessible?
 

Flymph

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I was reading up on the laws The Heretic linked to, what the heck is a "dirk"? I know what a dagger is, at least I used to know, never hear of a dirk.
Hit them with the pointy end.
and otherwise if you dont have a carry permit? would it be fine to have an unloaded firearm in a locked box in the trunk? like...a bugout survival box? as long as nit readily accessible?
Well, yeah. Technically the ammo has to be separate from the firearm, so in two different containers.
Hey guys and gals, Whats the short on how I can carry in a vehicle.
I am liscensed with my CC but I am rarely in a car so I just transport in a lockbox unloaded and gear back up at my destination, is this needed.
Why else would you get a CCL?
Just so you can tuck your shirt over it? LoL
Technically, it seems you can even open carry in a vehicle as long as the gun is readily visible and on your person. My guess is that a shoulder rig would be the best way to openly carry in a vehicle, but the open carry law states that the holster has to be on the hip. Well, since you have a CCL you don't even have to ponder these questions.

I should probably get mine...:s0073:

Thanks for the link, @The Heretic
 

Camelfilter

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For CHL holders, the only reasons I can think on to remove a concealed handgun from on person routinely when driving is for better/reliable access & if going to visit prohibited places.

Also, & obviously: provided one has an appropriate vehicle mounted holster while in the vehicle, and reasonably secure in vehicle storage when not.

Again, obviously, always go onbody if doing the vehicle mounted holster thing...far more likely to need it afoot than setting in a vehicle. ie “just a quick run into XYZ shop” might lead one to complacency.

2 things have occurred in that example. Firearm not reasonably secured in vehicle and, your not armed.

Non CHL holders? Best to simply get a CHL, or contact a knowledgeable attorney. Open carry is legal in Oregon, however as noted previously, municipalities can & do regulate (non CHL) open carry.

As to what is, and what is not open carry in a vehicle (for a non CHL holder)? I have no idea, and would not want to test any theories bandied about on the interwebs. Best to consult a knowledgeable attorney, or simply get a CHL.
 
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While I agree that a CHL is best with regards to easier compliance with the law, there are reasons some people don't want one.

If I understand the Oregon statutes correctly, simply putting a handgun in a "locked case" would be sufficient.

Many handguns come in a plastic case, that while not at all secure, should meet the definition of a locked case if a padlock was added - they have a place to add a padlock of some sort.

For those of us who drive vehicles without a locking compartment (glove compartment doesn't count per the law if I understand the law correctly, and mine doesn't lock anyway), and don't have a CHL, this would be one way to comply with the law?

My daily driver is a crossover with no trunk and no locking compartments. There is a cargo compartment with two false floors - neither of which comply with the law if you don't have a friendly LEO/judge/jury even though it would be very difficult to get to anything under the false floors (especially the lower one) while a passenger in the vehicle (although not totally impossible).

So putting a handgun in the case it comes with, and locking that with a padlock, should comply with the law IMO.
 
As to what is, and what is not open carry in a vehicle (for a non CHL holder)? I have no idea, and would not want to test any theories bandied about on the interwebs. Best to consult a knowledgeable attorney, or simply get a CHL.
Exactly, that's why I take the time and effort, and pay a few extra bucks to obtain an OR non-resident CHL. It does not require an insurmountable effort; having an attorney explain why "he's really a good guy" to an over-zealous prosecutor is vastly more expensive and time consuming.
 
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I would also add that my other vehicles, a flatbed truck, a pickup and two motorcycles, do not have locking compartments that comply with the law either. So for me and many others, it is a locking case or a CHL.
 
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Cool, I don't have a CHL and its a little more difficult for me to get one (non-citizen). But... I have put a box together with a med kit and some stuff and an unloaded 38 plus some 10shots of ammo in a seperat container within the container. Its got a combination lock on it and is far back in the trunk. I mainly did it because of recent events and want my wife and I to at least have the possibility of accessing it in such emergency.
 

ma96782

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I was reading up on the laws The Heretic linked to, what the heck is a "dirk"? I know what a dagger is, at least I used to know, never hear of a dirk.
Speaking about weapons.... "dirks and daggers" being against the law to possess. Well, I usually hear of them mentioned together. So anyway.....for me, an easy image of a dagger to remember is the famous Fairbairn–Sykes dagger.

Picture here: Fairbairn–Sykes fighting knife - Wikipedia

If you want a definition of "dagger" click the red below.

As for a dirk...…

Taken from Wikipedia:
A dirk is a long thrusting dagger. Historically, it was a personal weapon of officers engaged in naval hand-to-hand combat during the Age of Sail as well as the personal sidearm of Highlanders. It was also used by the officers, pipers, and drummers of Scottish Highland regiments around 1800 and by Japanese naval officers.

More info and a picture here: Dirk - Wikipedia

Aloha, Mark
 
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