Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Ah dun stole 'nuther wun!

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by Spitpatch, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Likes Received:
    836
    Forward beyond italics if ya just wanna see and hear about the gun. (that's what I'd do if I wuz you!)_

    This will be completely lost with the "tactical" crowd: someday they might come around to guns being not only fun, but preservation of history and (personal) finances. My sermons can be found elsewhere regarding investment percentages of increase and tax insulation delivered by firearm investment. No better deposit of investment income and documented return (tax free, unlike other schemes) can compare to good collectible, desirable guns. Even MODERATE education can deliver these positive and reliable returns to to you. I am NOT William DeVaney. If I visited his horse ranch or flew in his plane, I would ask him why he (in all his Hollywood expertise about investment) has not invested in good guns. I also am not employed (as William DeVaney is with gold) by any firm promoting educated investiment in firearms. I am just asking people to wake up! Governmental gun control efforts have very little to do with safety or crime prevention. The very ROOT of those efforts is the huge financial gain that is obtainable by the common man, untaxable. The United States Government will seek you out and kill you if you do not pay them what you owe them. They will kill you for money. Hence their crucial interest in a trade and commerce that is Constitutionally protected, and protected from taxes. They can't stand it. Buy a gun today for a hundred dollars, and with your rudimentary education sell it for three hundred dollars (66.6% return on investment) a week later, tax free! The U.S. Government is fully aware this is happening on a regular basis!! They would kill you for that $200 if there was a law that said they deserved taxes on it (and you refused).

    Wanna know why millionaires, billionaires and Hollywood actors invest in art? Well, it sure as Haedes ain't their taste! Tax free when they sell it on appreciated value. (Federal Gov't runs real tight on the art auctions now because of this, but "me to you" sales cannot be taxed unless declared by a party).

    Art doesn't have any Constitutional protections. Guns do. Bites the Feds bigger than all the shootings put together.

    Okay, off the soapbox that I said was already stated: Here's the latest find and latest story:


    I had no idea these guns existed. ), but freely profess my ignorance about the Model 90....

    Until Yesterday.

    Local gunshop merely minutes from my home. An icon, in that it's false storefront (as in old western towns) actually graced the pages of the Leupold catalog one year (Leupold factory is about another 13 minutes away).

    I reguarly stop there, much as I checked my traplines as a teenager to keep my girlfriend and car running: might be something to my benefit. Yesterday on the used rack there was a very plain looking shotgun. Over/Under. Hmm. I'm in the market (and have been for 10years: maybe I'm just a window shopper) for a quality 20ga O/U. This ain't it.

    Pulled it down. Light! Good shape. Thought at first glance one of the newer "entry level" Turkish or Russian import O/U's. In the hand, it was certainly on a higher plane. Proprietor casts his voice to advise, "Marlin 90: I didn't know what it was until I looked it up". Comrades in ignorance.

    I did all the stuff you're supposed to do: Broke it. Looked down the tubes. Closed it (taking care to pressure the lever upon doing so, and not slap it as you might in the field). Then checked to make sure it did lock even with relief on the lever.

    Tight as a small flying insect's rectum. Query to the proprietor, "50's or 60's?" confirmed my estimate (inaccurately in our shared ignorance) for manufacture. Yeah, we know our stuff.

    And then, I put it back on the shelf, and tried very desperately to seem completely disinterested for the rest of my visit. Conversation quickly went to Prairie Dogs and Presidents. I departed sometime thereafter.

    On the way home from work today, stopped in again. Picked it up again. (Gun marked "consignment".) Asked about wiggle room. Answer: "For you, a bit". Yeah, stroke me as a "preferred customer". That's what my Credit Card company calls me.

    I advised as how the 16 ga. was completely undesirable, a useless and obsolete shotgun guage with mold and mildew on it that will never be shed. Gun marked "$369". I offer "three and a quarter". He comes back with "three fifty, owner's pretty tight". I tell him he's been watching "Pawn Stars" too much. He changes the conversation back to Presidents and Prairie Dogs. I had done no research on the gun. I just saw a gun that called to me: a vintage Marlin in absolutely perfect shape. It appeared as if it had been carried on one hard season of Pheasant hunting with great care for a new gun.

    I participated in his "P&P" conversation for about 10 minutes, feigned interest in other trinkets (if you call a 12x Leupold a trinket), and then abruptly challenged his "three fifty". (I was done with foreplay, I wanted business.) He held and knew he had me. I said "write 'er up!"

    Then (and only then) I confessed that I was NOT a shotgun man. I had five or six, and the vast majority were 16 ga., based on the fact I'd killed my very first Pheasant with my Iver Johnson Cycle Works Champion in 1967: The bird went up, and Dad patiently waited until I felt I might accomplish something, and then a bit longer, and then finally, I pulled the trigger. The rooster was instantly sick, and coasted to dead. Dad said that was the very first Pheasant he'd ever seen killed at 75 yards. (They choked those old guns FULL!).

    And so, I took the Model 90 home, with a farewell to the Proprietor and telling him that I knew I got the better of the deal, because she was so perfect in condition, and being a Marlin, "there won't be any more". We of the cloth know this to be true.

    Armchair research tonight reveals 1947 manufacture (I've seen guns with 6 months usage showing more wear). She ain't a virgin, but she's about as close as a guy can get.


    P2080237_zps28cb12b2.jpg

    P2080236_zpsa74f78fc.jpg

    P2080234_zpsfb8520dd.jpg
     
  2. TJdamon

    TJdamon Gladstone Member

    Messages:
    113
    Likes Received:
    23
    She's a beauty!!
     
  3. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    5,774
    Likes Received:
    4,961
    I hate you just a little bit right now. It will pass with time. But I warn you do this again it may return.

    What a beautiful gun
     
  4. MarkAd

    MarkAd Port Orchard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,422
    Likes Received:
    616
    oh my,
    Oh, your suppose to give me the combination to your safe.
     
  5. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Likes Received:
    836
    Yeah. Sold for about $75.00 in 1947: about a full week's wages for a well-paid working man, (or craftsman). Translation to today: probably over $1000. Not a cheap gun. Sears Roebuck (in 1937)a saw the emptiness of ANY American Over/Under, and asked Marlin to design and market one with Sears name on it.

    Marlin complied. The gun was VERY successful, and ran until 1960 (in various forms). For a huge number of years, this was the ONLY American Over/Under.

    Some guns are marked Sears Roebuck, others JC Higgins. Later guns (if you call 1947 later, like this one ) were marketed by Marlin, and had only the Marlin stamp. Earlier than this, Sears actually asked Marlin to stamp their name on them (along with Sears) to boost sales (after the Sears-only marked guns dragged). It worked.
     
  6. drew

    drew OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,052
    Likes Received:
    970
    I like guns that have Sears, a hardware company like Coast to Coast, or similar marks on them.

    Mainly because it reminds me of when you could use go to a hardware store and buy a gun.
     
  7. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Likes Received:
    836
    enjoy,

    better luc nextime.!!
     
  8. Swedish K

    Swedish K SW Washington Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,943
    Likes Received:
    1,231
    good looking shotgun you got there. Too bad 16ga shells cost about twice the price of 12ga - I discovered that a couple of years ago when grandpa gave me his two shotguns - an old model 12 pump and an FN built early production Browning Auto 5 - both in 16ga. I find myself shooting the 870 and my O/U 90% of the time as it is so much less expensive and easier to find 12ga shells.
     
  9. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Likes Received:
    836
    Well, for a guy who happily recently paid a dollar thirty seven EACH for .25-20 Single Shot brass from Jameson, and spends about 5 and a half hours to produce 100 pieces of .256 Winchester brass from .357, I will consider any added expense of 16ga shells just the price of liking weird stuff nobody else has. (And, I have a healthy stockpile in the ammo cabinet: one of those boxes might even be the box from which the shell came that killed that first Pheasant.);)
     
  10. Swedish K

    Swedish K SW Washington Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,943
    Likes Received:
    1,231
    Spitpatch - I hear you - I believe I still have a partial box of nitro express 20 ga shells from my first or second pheasant season. I'd love to refinish the A5 as the bluing is shot - resale doesn't come into it as family heirloom is more important to me than potential sale price. If it were something picked up in a trade I'd probably sell/trade it for a 12ga version.
     
  11. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Likes Received:
    836
    Right alongside this Marlin on the rack was an Auto 5 Sweet Sixteen (Belgian). Probably another 40's-50's gun, and in good to very good condition. I looked pretty hard at that one too! Gunshop guy knows Brownings better than he knew Marlin shotguns: the Browning is priced at $875. VERY fair for that gun.

    Afficionados on the 16ga website and the Marlin site all confirm I got away with grand larceny on this good Marlin. But I would have probably paid more to get it.
     
  12. tahoe2

    tahoe2 Seattle area, Washington state Member

    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    22
    you got a jewel with that one, I've been on the lookout for a 16 double for some time, most I've seen were toast,
    the ones that were palatable were way overpriced. Congrats on that one !!!
     
  13. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    7,551
    Likes Received:
    10,556
    Since I'm not personally a fan of O/U's, I can say congratulations with out the jealousy! It really is a nice piece!
     
  14. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    3,774
    Likes Received:
    1,960
    Nice find. From the pictures, it would be very hard to tell it isn't brand new.
     
  15. fry

    fry pacific north west Active Member

    Messages:
    602
    Likes Received:
    65
    thanks for the great story and pics