bbbass

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Interesting.

Coupla things:

1. I absolutely hate m/s measurements.
2. Example indicated the machine needed a Beaufort 6 (strong breeze) which is 25-31mph wind... Yeah that's pretty strong.
3. At a Beaufort 6 the machine could produce 8kw... this is about what a small ceramic space heater puts out on half power setting. Gonna take a lot of machines.

(Ah shoot!! As regards #3 above... I messed up! A ceramic space heater uses 1500W on high and only 750W on low. Brain fart! Sorry!!!:oops:)

I much prefer a system of passive solar collectors on a passive-solar designed home that has heat storage medium either behind the walls or in basement. Works well on the coast if you're up out of the fog, but here, in La Grande, I'd go for a house mostly buried in a hillside.

The house I built in Brookings had some passive solar features:

Photos&Scans 785.jpg Photos&Scans 722.jpg
 
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Interesting. Why not just have a wood burning fire place?
Maybe the wood burning heater is more effective, but one must process enough firewood and season them (dry them out, age them, etc) in order to have usable firewood... which consumes physical labor and time. Agreed with others that in some areas, solar power, geothermal, and water power generated electric heating are better.
 

bbbass

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The Gorge, maybe the high desert areas, if unwilling to use juniper for firewood :rolleyes: although solar is probably better for those areas?

Lots of RVers in the desert had both... all bases covered.

What about water wheels, especially in the areas that have year-round running streams or creeks? May be best for winter in the mountains because of snow runoff?

I love water wheels. Paradise Lodge, on the Rogue River, has a very small creek coming in and powers the entire lodge from a water wheel. Mill Creek in Cove has a large Pelton wheel on it that sells commercial power to the utility. These can be built large or small for whatever size creek.

Maybe the wood burning heater is more effective, but one must process enough firewood and season them (dry them out, age them, etc) in order to have usable firewood... which consumes physical labor and time.

Yup, those days are gone for me... too crippled up. I used to enjoy having a wood stove, but never enjoyed getting wood, nor splitting/stacking/moving/stacking/moving/stacking, then cleaning up the messes.
 
Interesting design. Where we lived for a spell in a remote part of Oregon, we got a ton of wind up in the high plains, but there wasn't much in the way of trees in the immediate area. It had to be harvested in the next county. In such a situation, that would make sense.

Where we are now, we've got plenty of timber, so we heat the house with a woodstove and a heat pump. Not so much wind.

Thanks for posting the link. :)
 
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That would actually be a viable option where I live. Quite a bit of wind in the winter months. I would seriously consider a couple windmills for heat and electricity if I had a smaller house. Probably solar too.
 
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Well shoot we better ban them then. I mean most of them are a black scary wood burning stove!:s0112:
They are working on it. Washington County alone already has tons of public sectors working to get rid of them because they “pollute” more than natural gas furnaces.
 

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