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Turning your birdshot into a slug

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by darkminstrel, Dec 29, 2011.

  1. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

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    Yes, it's all over the net. Yes I understand the lower power charge will not project the slug with the force or to the distance of a purpose built round.

    But have you done it? I'd love to pick up a 25 round box for $5 and turn them all into slugs. Considering a factory loaded 12ga slug is priced at .80-1.20 each I can see the investment of time making it worthwhile. Would buying the slug and just dumping the shot be another viable alternative?

    Info was originally found here; Turning Birdshot into Slugs for Self-Defense | The Firearm Blog
     
  2. Wood Worker

    Wood Worker Linn County Oregon Active Member

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    Might be less time consuming to get a lee 1ounce lead slug mold for 12 gauge, and then buy shotshells to convert.
     
  3. gunfreak

    gunfreak Boise Well-Known Member

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    There is another way...

    Hold your shell finding where the wad is. Cut through the plastic hull of the shell 'about an inch from base of the brass' leaving a small finger nail of plastic holding the two pieces together. I don't know about firing these in a choked gun but in my cylinder bore 870 I can punch a nice clean hole through an object. An ole timer showed me this. Kept one in his pocket when bird hunting so if he came upon a deer he could take home some meat. It also will impress your redneck friends.
     
  4. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

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    The article was referencing a dirt poor guy from a different country doing what he could. Certainly I can afford a mould to do the casting with. I'm really just thinking that I could have some fun with 'plinking' slugs, as it were, without counting the dollar signs as they flew down range.

    I've read about and seen this method used. Can be funny as hell when you load up a round when the shooter doesn't expect it.
     
  5. Wood Worker

    Wood Worker Linn County Oregon Active Member

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    I understand that the fella giving the depictions was in another country.
    I certainly think that buying the mold and using it for making fun plinking rounds is far far cheaper than buying loaded slug rounds from the factory.
    I use them in my side by side coach 12 gauge, it is about as close as I can come to having my dream big bore gun.
     
  6. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

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    So I'm going to take the plunge. After hours of reading last night and this morning I've discovered that the bloody 'rifling' vanes on slugs meant for smooth bore barrels are only of use if you have a choke. I'm going to be firing from a cylinder bore HD shotgun and want the cheap slugs for training purposes only and not actual hunting.

    I'll buy factory slugs for accurate distance shooting and I'll drop the $20 on getting a slug mould so I can get the family trained up on short distance slug shooting.

    Plus I have some water jugs that need a good talking to.
     
  7. Wood Worker

    Wood Worker Linn County Oregon Active Member

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    I almost forgot.
    If you are closing the hull again by hand yourself, it is much easier to use brands with a 6 sided star flower look, not remington with all the little crimps.
    I have a bear of a time getting anything back into a remington hull by hand.
    Winchester and even federal target loads are much nicer.
     
  8. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    It's also possible that you too will be the proud owner of shotgun just like this guy's:

    barrel.jpg


    I find slug ammo to be cheap enough when I watch for sales or some "surplus" that the local dealer offers. Why "redneck" a round when the stuff is cheap. Far cheaper than a new shotgun.
     
    ogre and (deleted member) like this.
  9. oldbrass

    oldbrass WA Active Member

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    I`d only do this if it were a matter of last resort, say for instance I was grouce hunting and was attacked by Zombies..never a good idea to alter ammunition..
     
  10. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

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    Math;

    1)250 round box of #7 shot shells = 54.00(.21 per round)
    Mould = 26.00
    Lead dripper = 8.00
    Silicone sealant tube = 3.00

    2)5 rounds of 1oz slugs(5 pack Rem.) = 5.00($1 per round)
    250 rounds of 1oz slugs(best deal I found on the net, Federal) = 139.00(.55 per round)

    Using these numbers as a guide with mould materials INCLUDED you're looking at a final total of;

    Un-altered factory slug rounds = .55 per round, not including shipping

    Re-purposed birdshot rounds, materials included = .36 per round, not including shipping.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    From a purely monetary perspective the purchase of the molding items pays for itself immediately. Even factoring in consumables like propane and silicone your cost per round will not exceed .40 per shell.

    From a practicality stand point I'd say that it's a great way to plink on the cheap if you're using a shotgun that does not have any sort of choke in it. Or if you are not expecting any great deal of accuracy beyond 25m-35m.

    I'd never use a rednecked cut shell unless it was a matter of absolute necessity though. I can see a follow-up shot being the end of a barrel and my face.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2011
  11. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Accuracy seems to be overlooked by the "fans" of this approach. Purpose built slugs at least will have a tendency to spin some and be more stable at reasonable distances. Finding some ball bearings that would fit through the choke area of the tube would be more accurate. Just cut off the end of the shell, pour out the shot, add a ball bearing, secure with wax (or chewing gum in an emergency), and at least you'll have a lethal weapon with some accuracy. The ball bearings also work great in a slingshot;)