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Trap Shooting?

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by CrossHairs, Aug 15, 2010.

  1. CrossHairs

    CrossHairs Tigard Active Member

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    Folks,

    Been thinking about getting a trap gun. I tried trap a long time ago (back in the UK actually) and enjoyed it, so figured I might as well have some fun on another part of the TCGC property.

    I've started looking at some of the shotguns out there for trap, but wanted to see if anyone has any good recomendations/experiences!? Anything to avoid? Anything I should consider?
     
  2. Throckmorton

    Throckmorton Florence,Ore ah gone Well-Known Member

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    I guess it depnds some on wallet and wants..like always.
    dedicated trap shooters spend MEGA bucks on their guns because they shoot zillions of rounds and don't want them to wear prematurely,I'm thinking the hinge area is one area of concern.
    most shoot single shot guns as trap is primarily a one shot game..but not always.
    so then ya get to go buy another gun for doubles.
    great,eh? ;)
    trap targets are always a rising target,so trap guns are stocked to shoot high to allow for the rise.
    also, most shooters use lighter loads than you think,because of recoil and economy.most load their own for the same reason.
    as to choke,no 'standard',everyone has their own opinion on that one.

    ok,that's the extent of my knowledge..no way an expert.

    for the rest ot us it's a way to expend some shells with whatever shotgun we have at hand .My mossberg 500 will bust them,if I do my part.

    I hear that the staff and shooters' at the club on wren road? in hillsboro?? are real frindly and helpful,might drive over there and talk to a few and see their layout.I hear it's got at least a half dozen different kinds of trap types.
     
  3. rodell

    rodell Newcastle, WA Active Member

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    Pretty much anything can be used for clay busting. If you are going to shoot formal trap, you will need to consider a longer barrel (32"-34") due to the handicap distances if you want to be competitive.

    For the number of rounds shot, some become recoil sensitive. An autoloader solves that problem at the cost of maintenance and complexity. Also, if you are on a trap range, some kind of shell catcher is really appreciated by the guy next to you.

    Over/Unders are highly regarded for the ability to shoot doubles and to select barrels based on what is happening.

    Singles are my personal favorite for standard trap. You can spend from several hundred dollars to many thousands. There are getting to be quite a few "plain stocked" (non adjustable) Browning BT-99's around - a fine trap gun. I've seen some decent older specimens in the $600 range.

    As the previous poster pointed out, dedicated trap guns are designed to shoot high. It is generally done in the sight plane. It allows you to always see the rising target. If you regularly shoot trap and wildlife, you have to remember to adjust your sight picture accordingly when you change shotguns.

    Many people shoot trap (and sporting clays) with their field guns. I once took a national ranking with my trusty field-grade Remington 870. It was a windy, miserable day and the field gun was a better choice due to the dancing going on by the birds. If you use your field gun, be sure to watch for heating. Vented ribs are a must if you are going to shoot regularly.

    The real pros spend the mega bucks to get something that fits them and will consistently work and feel the same way. For example, you need to mount the gun the same way every single time if you want to remove variables. That can be for hundreds of rounds in a day if you are competing or have pride on the line! There are all kinds of stocks, recoil reducers, barrel configurations (single high, single low, dummy up, blah, blah), triggers (release or standard) and the like.

    Choke is a personal thing. Modified or Improved Modified are fine. People who are stepping back often go to full. If you're serious, you pattern your chokes on the grease board and choose accordingly. Full in one gun does not equal full in another.

    Target loads are generally lighter than field loads. My personal favorite is 1 1/8 oz of number 8 shot at about 1300 fps. (That's 18.2 gr of Hodgdon Clays). 7 1/2's or 8's are fine.

    Now, if they would only let me paint little faces on those birds I would never miss!

    Bob
     
  4. CrossHairs

    CrossHairs Tigard Active Member

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    Thanks, good information.

    Chances are, this will be for fun and pretty low volume. So i'm not prepared to spend mega bucks on something that will sit in the safe a good portion of the time. That said, if I like it and get on well....maybe later I would step up to something fancier.

    Sounds like an inexpensive field gun might do the trick for now just so I can have a little fun.
     
  5. nezz69

    nezz69 lebanon,oregon Member

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    ive been shooting trap for years and seen shooters use anything from a 50 shotgun to a $20,ooo . imho the original browning bt99 is a great gun you can find them used in good condition for $700 -$1000 if you go to any trap club somebody there will be shooting one.
     
  6. TANSTAAFL

    TANSTAAFL Downtown Seattle Member

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    If buying new, for the price you can get a much nicer autoloader than you can an over-under. The reason being the premium over-under shotguns are still all handmade where as premium autoloaders can done on a line. Remington, Browning, Benelli are all good guns. Find one that feels good to you and wont break the bank.

    I don't own a trap gun, I just threw a full choke on my FN SLP since I have no interest in going competitive. Now if I really wanted a trap gun I'd go with the Browning Silver or Winchester Super Xs since I'm already familiar with the action, feel and maintenance of my FN.

    If your price range is under $500--get a pump gun with two barrels (one you can switch to home defense) that have threaded chokes. If you end up not being able to get out as much as you'd like or not really your thing, you still have a decent 870 or 500 for home.
     
  7. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    I shoot a little trap informally with friends as one has nice portable double throw device you sit on to operate. Anyway he has one of those Remington stamped, Russian made O/U's and for in the range of $500.00 shoots well and he can break his share but I have a Remington 870 Special Field pump which for all intents and purposes is NOT a trap gun but due to it's short stroke pump I can break doubles fairly consistently - and I have the full choke sleeve in. I also had an opportunity to shoot a 20 Ga 1100 and man that was sweet! No recoil - you could shoot that all day. I find trap shooting addictive - and could very easily overdose on it!
     
  8. rodell

    rodell Newcastle, WA Active Member

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    Trap with a 20 gauge adds some fun. You don't see many on the line, though. If you are standing next to the trap as people do for fun they are a "blast".

    I stood on the trap house with my .44 mag and shot shells once. That was a hoot.