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Tips for removing welded flash hider or gunsmith wanted

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by ThemGunsThough, Oct 1, 2011.

  1. ThemGunsThough

    ThemGunsThough RIP City! Well-Known Member

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    Hi, okay so coincidentally, I need help AGAIN with removing a flash hider, but this time its for one that is welded on. I have an Armalite AR180B and I am trying to install a quadrail, but in order to do so, I need to remove the flash hider so I can slip on a few parts required for the accessory rail.

    I took it to a shop and they told me they would have to completely saw off the flash hider and install a new one. Does anyone else have any experience with this and/or tips? Also, if any one out there can do this at a low or reasonable price please let me know as well. I'm located in the Gresham / Portland area. Thanks.
     
  2. Skang

    Skang WA Well-Known Member

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  3. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Is the flash hider bored to fit the barrel and then fillet welded around the base of the hider to the barrel? I am just a 'shade tree' gunsmith but if that is the case it will probably have to be cut off as suggested or turned off on a lathe. I would check with a machine shop and see if they could do it. If you lived near me I would offer to do it for a half-rack and the experience.
     
  4. ThemGunsThough

    ThemGunsThough RIP City! Well-Known Member

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    The flash hider is threaded on but the pin, which secures the FH to the barrel, is apparently welded over with. I've had just one shop take a look at it and I may just end up taking it there. RVTECH - I don't know where LaPine is at exactly, but i'm in the Portland / Gresham area. Thank you all for your help. If there's anyone else out there that's willing to do this within the Portland area, please let me know.
     
  5. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Based on what you are saying the weld on the pin can possibly be 'surgically' removed with some careful grinding using a small device (I use a dental drill for things like this) and hopefully the pin can be removed with little effort. Unfortunately Lapine is near Sunriver, South of Bend so I don't think that is going to work for you.
     
  6. halmbarte

    halmbarte PDX Active Member

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    One word. Mike.

    Ok, three words, Mike at Tornado Tech.

    The guy ought to wear a white robe with a pointy hat cuz the man is a grand wizard with guns.

    Why bugger it up with a Dremel when Mike has done dozens of these with the right tools. He will be cheaper than a new barrel.

    H
     
  7. ThemGunsThough

    ThemGunsThough RIP City! Well-Known Member

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    Do you have his number? Thanks.
     
  8. halmbarte

    halmbarte PDX Active Member

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  9. ThemGunsThough

    ThemGunsThough RIP City! Well-Known Member

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    Looks like hes pretty booked and probably pretty expensive
     
  10. halmbarte

    halmbarte PDX Active Member

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    I'd suspect you're right. OTOH, he isn't a hack and your job is goin to get done right.

    You could take it to Roger at Revalation Arms, but then you'll be out the cash for the work, the price of a barrel to replace the one he trashes, and the cost of the muzzle device.

    H
     
  11. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    This is not a trivial operation as a lot of people here have made apparent. I have had to do similar operations with different things over the years (usually nuts on machine tools) for which there are similar penalties for damaging the underlying part (in your case the barrel). chances are you will be unable to remove the pin regardless of whether you can locate it or not, the closest you may get to that is if you can find the pin, and then very carefully grind away all the metal around it, and then pull the pin out with vice grips. If you're dedicated, what you can do is take a die grinder with a cut off wheel, and very (I MEAN VERY) carefully cut a slot on each side, starting at the muzzle end, and working your way back towards the barrel, being careful not to grind the barrel. You can then using a chisel snap the muzzle brake in half. You may need a die to chase the threads after this process when fitting a new brake. Chances are if it's .223 it's a 1/2-28 thread.

    Alternatively, if you have access to a lathe, you can cut off the muzzle brake, and then turn a blank shoulder in the barrel out of what remains of the brake, leave it at say .625" then get a new brake, drill or bore (I prefer boring with a bar) to .625 and then silver solder the new brake onto the old one after you are done (if you are required to have the brake to make the barrel of legal length). Again, this will necessitate repeating this process to remove your new handguard.

    A different plan may be possible, if you machine out the opening on the handguard, and simply make a two-part spacer that way you can avoid all the really difficult headaches and use a few really simple machined parts to make the handguard come on and off easily.

    To really make a serious determination as to which of these would be best, I would have to see some pictures of what you're trying to do.