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gmerkt

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I've been shooting for nearly 60 years, and reloading my own ammo for 36 years. I've never before stuck a bullet in a barrel. Yesterday, I had my first.

Shooting cast bullet 9mm Luger loads in a Colt Government Model. I'd already fired 50 jacketed bullets, then another 43 cast bullet loads. Shot number 44 of the cast loads would not chamber. Nor would cartridge #45. This was when I noticed a smoked 9mm casing at my feet. I removed the magazine and looked down the barrel. It was dark. Uh-oh.

I was lucky on this one. With a short, narrow stick, I was able to ascertain that there was only one bullet stuck. The base of the bullet was barely past the lip in the chamber where the case head spaces off of. It was stuck in the leade of the rifling. Which was a very good thing, because it prevented another cartridge from going into battery and being fired. Which was probably what would've happened, as I had no sensation of a squib load when #43 fired.

P6151226.JPG

When I got home, I was able to easily drive the stuck bullet out with a length of aluminum rod. After cleaning the barrel, there was no evidence of damage done. Which is a very good thing, as this pistol is one I rather prize and it isn't a cheap object.

This was in a last batch of ammo I loaded on progressive equipment before I discontinued that method. My sense of what happened is that the cause was a light load. The bullets in these rounds had hefty seating friction and I don't think the mere detonation of a primer would've dislodged the bullet. Plus the fact that I had no sensation of an anomaly, and the fired case ejected.
 

tac

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I'm old and cranky, and I've been reloading since 1968, and since 1978, on the same press - a single-stage Rockchucker. I guess it's probably because I don't feel the need to blast off a few hundred rounds at a time, or even a couple of thousand, from what I read here on occasions, that I've yet to have the malfunction that you mention.

That's probably because I'm able to look inside each and every case I reload, as I do it and again before the bullet gets seated.

I'm glad you noticed the glitch, and saw it for what it was - a flag in the process of being raised.
 
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I would agree with your assessment, and evidence supports, that the case ejected means you had a light load, not just "primer only" squib.
About 14 years ago I had a primer only squib on crimped bullets. The report was not as loud and it caused a FTE, but did lodge the bullet in the rifling.
 
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Is/are powder charge fluctuations a common issue with progressive powder charging systems?
In short, no.
Flake powders like titegroup, can/will clump and flow terribly. I would use a rod to tap the hopper every few rounds, and stir it when I had to add another tube of primers or add more cases to the case feed. If I followed this practice assiduously, I did not have a problem.
The only other time I experienced a problem was when I had cleaned and oiled the powder drop for storage (Hornady LnL AP). Didn't use acetone to make sure it was completely oil free, and it caused "quirky" loads, i.e. most OK, some light.
 
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Flake powders like titegroup, will clump and flow terribly.
Oh heck this common with typical hand operated powder measures as well.

There is a 'fix' for it however and depending on the measure it may or may not improve its consistency.

I too can admit to one squib a few years ago. I was shooting .38 Special out of a Taurus 605 and one round sounded 'funny' and I saw no impact at the dirt bank. So I removed all the shells and looked down the barrel and saw no 'light and the end of the tunnel' !

The round made it past the forcing cone and into the rifling but didn't go far. I tapped it out and went on shooting. I suspect it was a light charge as well from a clumped up measure with Bullseye.
 
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Oh heck this common with typical hand operated powder measures as well.

There is a 'fix' for it however and depending on the measure it may or may not improve its consistency.

I too can admit to one squib a few years ago. I was shooting .38 Special out of a Taurus 605 and one round sounded 'funny' and I saw no impact at the dirt bank. So I removed all the shells and looked down the barrel and saw no 'light and the end of the tunnel' !

The round made it past the forcing cone and into the rifling but didn't go far. I tapped it out and went on shooting. I suspect it was a light charge as well from a clumped up measure with Bullseye.
What is this "fix" of which you write?
I'll shake the powder bottle before pouring into the hopper, and then the two tapping / stirring techniques as I mentioned.
Some powders are worse than others. H870, a ball powder, is pretty bad. My Universal clumps up too.
 
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What is this "fix" of which you write?
OK - if you remove the 'drum' from the powder measure/thrower and use some 280 ish wetordry sandpaper and slightly bevel the edge of the top opening of the drum it will help to give the powder a slight 'relief' as it passes under the hopper and picks up the charge.

It will NOT change any accuracy as the micrometer adjuster stem regulates that regardless.

If you have never taken your drum out do so and run your finger around the edge of the opening and you will find it to be very sharp and sometimes nicked and dented and this is where the powder will clump up.
 
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OK - if you remove the 'drum' from the powder measure/thrower and use some 280 ish wetordry sandpaper and slightly bevel the edge of the top opening of the drum it will help to give the powder a slight 'relief' as it passes under the hopper and picks up the charge.

It will NOT change any accuracy as the micrometer adjuster stem regulates that regardless.

If you have never taken your drum out do so and run your finger around the edge of the opening and you will find it to be very sharp and sometimes nicked and dented and this is where the powder will clump up.
Thanks. Will have to check that on the 650
 
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This was in a last batch of ammo I loaded on progressive equipment before I discontinued that method. My sense of what happened is that the cause was a light load.
Let me guess the progressive was a LEE 1000.

The bullets in these rounds had hefty seating friction and I don't think the mere detonation of a primer would've dislodged the bullet.
The primer with no powder will propel a bullet into the barrel 100% of the time.

Squibs are a fact of life in the shooting world, hand loads, factory, it happens.
 

gmerkt

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The primer with no powder will propel a bullet into the barrel 100% of the time.
I disagree, I've personally seen .223 Rem. with no powder charge fail to dislodge a bullet with only a primer for propellant.

Let me guess the progressive was a LEE 1000
No, Dillon 550.

Squibs are a fact of life in the shooting world, hand loads, factory, it happens.
Absolutely true. Man or machine, mistakes are gonna happen. And man designs and runs machines.
 
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4.0 gr. of Titegroup. Which I've fired successfully a few hundred rounds of in both my Glock 17 and Smith & Wesson Model 59 with no problems. And 42 times in the Colt.
Hmmm, not to be a dick (I know I often sound like it...sigh) but that info, while interesting, and generating more topics I'd like to engage with you over, is not specs/data.
Granted, since I don't use Titegroup, I'd have to look up load data, it would be helpful to know all the specific information about your particular load. Additionally, in the interest of this squib incident, which barrel you are using in the Glock. I guarantee nobody knows where I'm going with that question.
Further, that you are using that load in the 59 without incident leads to more discussion!

Joe
 
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Let me guess the progressive was a LEE 1000.


The primer with no powder will propel a bullet into the barrel 100% of the time.

Squibs are a fact of life in the shooting world, hand loads, factory, it happens.
Post #6 the OP tells...us...which progressive he stopped using.

Joe
 
I've created a few "mistakes" myself.
Don't try 38 Special loads in a 357 MAX case. At least with a lead bullet the squib can be pushed out fairly easily.
But the primer only load in my 30-06 wouldn't even budge the bullet. I never heard the primer pop, just the firing pin hit. A pistol case is much smaller and I could see the bullet moving out of the case, but it wouldn't have enough energy to cycle the action.
I believe it was a light load.
 

Spitpatch

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I'm old and cranky, and I've been reloading since 1968, and since 1978, on the same press - a single-stage Rockchucker. I guess it's probably because I don't feel the need to blast off a few hundred rounds at a time, or even a couple of thousand, from what I read here on occasions, that I've yet to have the malfunction that you mention.

That's probably because I'm able to look inside each and every case I reload, as I do it and again before the bullet gets seated.

I'm glad you noticed the glitch, and saw it for what it was - a flag in the process of being raised.
I wish I'd written that. The very distinction between a "reloader" and a "handloader" articulated perfectly.
 
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