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Target Practicing With a .22 Rifle

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At what distance do you start out? Do you use paper targets? If not, what are the most effective targets? If you are sighting with rifle irons, at what distance do you know you are effective? Do you use a spotting scope? Do you just start out with a rifle scope? Your thoughts, please?
 
Always start w/ Bore site or barrel laser sight at 25ft or so, then move to paper at 50 yards.
Then use this method for sighting it in to dead center:

Hope that helps.
 
OP
G8rHunter
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Always start w/ Bore site or barrel laser sight at 25ft or so, then move to paper at 50 yards.
Then use this method for sighting it in to dead center:

Hope that helps.
Hmmm, I don't have a scope and especially that fancy. I like the foil idea, though. I have binoculars, and I thought I would learn to sight my target first with my rifle irons. Thanks!
 
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At what distance do you start out? Do you use paper targets? If not, what are the most effective targets? If you are sighting with rifle irons, at what distance do you know you are effective? Do you use a spotting scope? Do you just start out with a rifle scope? Your thoughts, please?
Your first question should be "What am I practicing for?" Answer that and everything falls into place.
 
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I enjoy 50 feet with my rimfire. That’s a standard rimfire competition distance, and there are appropriate targets with 9 circles on each page. I zero my iron sights on the center circle, check and adjust, then shoot for groups on the other circles. If I’m working basics, like sight alignment, breathing, trigger press, and follow through, then I shoot off a front only sandbag rest from a bench. I never check my targets between shots or I end of chasing a hole and my groups open up.
Once I’ve got comfortable with the basics, I move to a new target and shoot three groups from standing, seated, and prone. I will occasionally sling up in prone and seated.
I am not fancy enough to use a shooting jacket, glove, or usually even a spotting scope. But generally, it is my thought that if through my positional rimfire shooting I can keep all my shots in the black (or at least close) on the quarter size circles with iron sights, then my skills are sufficient to be minute of deer vital with my scoped rifles when it’s time to pull them out. The same skills translate.
 

AndyinEverson

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I like to bore sight my rifle...
Then zero at 25 yards...If my rifle has iron sights , I like to practice so I can do a good clean shot out to 50 yards on a target the size of the average grouse head...
If scoped...I extend that range to 75 yards.
Shooting at the stray leftover bits of clay birds , spent shot shell or odd colored small rock at the local shooting pit is a fun way to do this....

This is not to say that I have never shot farther than those ranges listed...I have and will continue to do so....just for fun however , not hunting.

I use my .22 rifles for hunting and just general "plinking" type of shooting...its pretty casual...if I was a more serious target shooter , my practice might be different.
Andy
 
OP
G8rHunter
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The .22 is for deer hunting. So, it makes sense to have a target and keep the bullets confined to it.
Your first question should be "What am I practicing for?" Answer that and everything falls into place.
I got the .22 primarily for target practice, and because the ammo is cheap. Many on this forum said the. 22 would help develop my shooting skills. I thought I would originally let my shotgun be my all-around hunting weapon, but hunting deer with slugs, while sometimes done, is not the preferred weapon of choice by most. So, ultimately, I want a deer rifle. I just love the taste of venison too much! My deer rifle will likely be somewhere in the neighborhood of a 30-30 to a .308. I realized the other day that seeing where the .22 lands from even 25 yards is not easy. After all, the bullet mark is tiny. Walking out and visibly inspecting each shot at a target range won't work with others around. My intention is to hit the target and stay within a 4" pattern. As you know, I am a beginner not a sharpshooter. Of course I want to hit the bullseye but I am attempting to set reasonable goals. So, how do others practice? Perhaps mastering 25 yards with my .22 rifle is the place to begin. Someone helped me sight-in my .22 on day one. For some reason, I couldn't get my binoculars to focus at 25 yards. I'm not sure if it was the cold weather or the binoculars didn't like the paper targets. I am just wondering how others practice and what I may be able to adopt?
 

Joe13

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Where are you shooting?

Range or woods?

If in the woods bring that target up to 10 yards and start there and move out.

Are you shooting from a bench or standing?

You may need a few years before your ready to hunt depending on how fast you pick this up.

A 22 is a good trainer but you will need to put a good amount of ammo thru a hunting rifle if you've never shot one at distance, while standing - so don't just buy one box when you buy a rifle;)
 

beavernation

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Find and attend an "Appleseed shooting clinic" sponsored by the Revolutionary War Veterans Association. All of your questions can be answered and there is no greater value for basic marksmanship skills. I have been shooting for 45 yrs. I have learned a new skill each time I have attended (3)!!
 
OP
G8rHunter
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Where are you shooting?

Range or woods?

If in the woods bring that target up to 10 yards and start there and move out.

Are you shooting from a bench or standing?

You may need a few years before your ready to hunt depending on how fast you pick this up.

A 22 is a good trainer but you will need to put a good amount of ammo thru a hunting rifle if you've never shot one at distance, while standing - so don't just buy one box when you buy a rifle;)
I have 1400 rounds of 22 ammo. I will be probably starting out in the out-of-doors. BTW, good suggestions! You may be right, I might be nowhere close to being ready to go hunting. I have always excelled at sports, but I have found shooting to be much different from baseball, football, basketball.
 

Joe13

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I have 1400 rounds of 22 ammo. I will be probably starting out in the out-of-doors. BTW, good suggestions! You may be right, I might be nowhere close to being ready to go hunting. I have always excelled at sports, but I have found shooting to be much different from baseball, football, basketball.
Potatoes make good biodegradable targets.

I like to shoot spent shotgun shells you can find at most places as well.

Find someone who knows a lot more to go with you and you'll pick it up faster.

Classes are also great if you can afford them.
 
OP
G8rHunter
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Find and attend an "Appleseed shooting clinic" sponsored by the Revolutionary War Veterans Association. All of your questions can be answered and there is no greater value for basic marksmanship skills. I have been shooting for 45 yrs. I have learned a new skill each time I have attended (3)!!
Thanks for the suggestion. Others have also recommended this event, and I see, starting in the spring, there is one almost once a month around the Portland Oregon area.
 

Joe13

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Thanks for the suggestion. Others have also recommended this event, and I see, starting in the spring, there is one almost once a month around the Portland Oregon area.
Just make sure they offer loaner rifles or you will need something larger then a .22lr rifle I believe.
 
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The .22 is for deer hunting. So, it makes sense to have a target and keep the bullets confined to it.

I got the .22 primarily for target practice, and because the ammo is cheap. Many on this forum said the. 22 would help develop my shooting skills. I thought I would originally let my shotgun be my all-around hunting weapon, but hunting deer with slugs, while sometimes done, is not the preferred weapon of choice by most. So, ultimately, I want a deer rifle. I just love the taste of venison too much! My deer rifle will likely be somewhere in the neighborhood of a 30-30 to a .308. I realized the other day that seeing where the .22 lands from even 25 yards is not easy. After all, the bullet mark is tiny. Walking out and visibly inspecting each shot at a target range won't work with others around. My intention is to hit the target and stay within a 4" pattern. As you know, I am a beginner not a sharpshooter. Of course I want to hit the bullseye but I am attempting to set reasonable goals. So, how do others practice? Perhaps mastering 25 yards with my .22 rifle is the place to begin. Someone helped me sight-in my .22 on day one. For some reason, I couldn't get my binoculars to focus at 25 yards. I'm not sure if it was the cold weather or the binoculars didn't like the paper targets. I am just wondering how others practice and what I may be able to adopt?
Starting from scratch. Wants to learn Basic Marksmanship for deer hunting sometime in the future. Got it.

I'm an AOCS grad so my take on riflery is tainted a bit.

https://www.trngcmd.marines.mil/Portals/207/Docs/wtbn/MCRP 3-01A.pdf

Read chapter 6. Pretty much covers the basics in field shooting as well as use of a sling. You will have to filter thru some stuff to get what you need. You will also be required to shout OORAH when turning the page.;)

As for targets: Paper don't lie. It lets you see the results of each shot. If you can't see where an errant round goes you have no idea how to correct for it. You can also collect your targets in a ring binder as a record of improvement or just to check later to look for issues.

Starting distance will depend on where you're shooting. At a formal range you may be stuck with a set minimum distance. If not start at 50 ft until you are getting good groups from whatever shooting positions you are working on. Move back as skill level increases.

Spotting scope. If possible have somebody else spot for you. If not get a scope/mount that you can use without having to disturb yourself too much from your shooting position. It's a pain in the bubblegum to get down into a prone position, take a shot, get up to look thru the scope, then get back down again.

1400 rounds is a good start. Buy more for next week.
 
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OP
G8rHunter
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Staring from scratch. Wants to learn Basic Marksmanship for deer hunting sometime in the future. Got it.

I'm an AOCS grad so my take on riflery is tainted a bit.

https://www.trngcmd.marines.mil/Portals/207/Docs/wtbn/MCRP 3-01A.pdf

Read chapter 6. Pretty much covers the basics in field shooting as well as use of a sling. You will have to filter thru some stuff to get what you need. You will also be required to shout OORAH when turning the page.;)

As for targets: Paper don't lie. It lets you see the results of each shot. If you can't see where an errant round goes you have no idea how to correct for it. You can also collect your targets in ring binder as a record of improvement or just to check later to look for issues.

Starting distance will depend on where you're shooting. At a formal range you may be stuck with a set minimum distance. If not start at 50 ft until you are getting good groups from whatever shooting positions you are working on. Move back as skill level increases.

Spotting scope. If possible have somebody else spot for you. If not get a scope/mount that you can use without having to disturb yourself too much from your shooting position. It's a pain in the bubblegum to get down into a prone position, take a shot, get up to look thru the scope, then get back down again.

1400 rounds is a good start. Buy more for next week.
Downloaded, thanks!
 

ezra45

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I remove the bolt and after sandbagging my rifle in solidly, I look through the bore at an orange 3" triangle I have set up at 25 yds. Once the triangle is centered in the bore, I then move the cross hairs to center up the triangle. If shooting a .22LR or mag, I then shoot it at 50 yds at the range.
I often move the 3" steel out to 100 yds for .22LR and 200yds for .22 Mag. great fun!
Back at home, I have two .22 rifles that I shoot CCI Quiets or CB Longs out of. I have a range that goes from 35 feet to 50 yards on my back uphill acre. I shoot off hand with a single shot and a bolt action at AR500 steel gongs that range from 2" to 5" in target area size. I prefer the steel because all the upkeep is a spray can of paint and when one shoots successfully, there is instant gratification, rain or shine. Works great with pellet rifles as well.
There is a paper plate holder on the left out there as well for groups.

Regards,

ezra
 
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OP
G8rHunter
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View attachment 556626 View attachment 556623 View attachment 556624 I remove the bolt and after sandbagging my rifle in solidly, I look through the bore at an orange 3" triangle I have set up at 25 yds. Once the triangle is centered in the bore, I then move the cross hairs to center up the triangle. If shooting a .22 or or mag, I then shoot it at 50 yds at the range.

Back at home, I have two .22 rifles that I shoot CCI Quiets or CB Longs out of. I have a range that goes from 35 feet to 50 yards on my back uphill acre. I shoot off hand with a single shot and a bolt action at AR500 steel gongs that range from 2" to 5" in target area size. I prefer the steel because all the upkeep is a spray can of paint and when one shoots successfully, there is instant gratification, rain or shine. Works great with pellet rifles as well.
There is a paper plate holder on the left out there as well for groups.

Regards,

ezra
I definitely like the sound of hitting steel. If I had acreage, I would have already bought some steel frying pans at Goodwill for $6 a piece and set them up. I figured a .22 wouldn't put much of a dent on those extra thick steel frying pans. I have been reading about using steel, and I understand they have to be setup to avoid ricochet's, is that correct?
 

ezra45

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You are correct. AR500 steel targets are my favorite because they are so hard that practically any bullet that hits will splatter and not ricochet. Any steel used should never be static or at least angled down. One does not need acreage to use steel. At both ranges I belong to in both states, one can use AR500 swinging steel targets if placed at the base of the berm and at least 50 yds away from the benches. The targets above in my post range from $7 to $16 and are hung from simple stands made from stuff I had laying around. Another benefit of AR500 over mild steel is that with .22s, they will never wear out if you get the 3/8" or 1/2" thick ones. 1/2" thick and thicker can also be used for pistols up to .44 Mag!

Regards,

ezra
 
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